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20

Clone the gitosis git repository again and then install it again using the --record option: sudo python setup.py install --record uninstall.txt Which will produce a text file containing all the installed files. Then just delete them. sudo cat uninstall.txt | xargs rm -rf You may want to remove the git user: userdel -f git as well as the git group: ...


12

Use the cruft package.


9

There is a file in the build directory called .installed.list. This appears to be a list of all the files that get installed.


9

You remove their admin rights. If they don't know what they're doing, they shouldn't have admin rights anyway, and there is no way to stop an administrative (or root) account from doing whatever they want on the machine. That is the nature (and indeed, the point) of root/admin.


8

There is not. Because a puppet module can execute arbitrary commands, there's no way to determine exactly what "unapply" means. Some modules ship with a corresponding anti-module that will perform the uninstall (e.g, foo vs foo::disable), but that requires explicit coding.


8

Short answer - you can't. Long answer - you can monkey with permissions on specific registry keys, folders, etc such that it is more difficult for a local admin to remove the product. If you want to go this way I recommend the uninstall registry keys under HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Uninstall. Unless someone has the ...


5

Have you tried yum remove jdk?


5

Yes, it's not installed via the package manager, so it's going to need you to do two things to uninstall uberSVN completely (it would be good to know why you want to uninstall too?). Stop uberSVN and apache, either via the UI or by using the control script - "/etc/init.d/ubersvncontrol stop" and "/etc/init.d/svnservercontrol stop" (or if you must, by ...


5

I think WMIC commands can be run from a single line which should make it easier to add to a batch file. And by adding /nointeractive then it should disable prompting as well. Try something like this: wmic product where name="software" call uninstall /nointeractive


5

Background Information: Much of the slowness of a Windows Installer session is due to its rollback capabilities. Firstly it creates a restore point prior to install or uninstall (provided system restore hasn't been disabled). Then it will back up all affected files and registry keys during both uninstall and install to ensure that the system can be restored ...


4

although it would be nice, but there is no unapply available. you would have to write an undo recipe yourself, depending on what you did exactly (installed package? then purge it, added user? then disable it, etc.) the replaced files should be stored in the clientbucket (/var/lib/puppet/clientbucket usually but it depends on your version and your setting)


4

You shouldn't install software this way. Removing software which was installed like this may be dangerous: unpack the same ruby to /tmp run: ./configure --prefix=/tmp/somedir # by default prefix points to /usr/local make make install # this will install ruby in /tmp/somedir instead of where you've installed it cd /tmp/somedir ...


4

One solution, would be to update Java to remove the vulnerability. Next, write a small application that wraps the java executable (ie: rename java.exe to java-real.exe and make an app called java.exe that just passes all the arguments to java.exe and logs the calls to a file. After a month (or however long until you feel comfortable), if the log's empty, ...


4

Put it into a startup script and link that GPO so that all computers will process it.


4

Sounds like the zones in question are Active-Directory integrated and hosted on at least one other server, judging by the fact that they're still resolving. If you have other AD controllers running DNS, this is almost guaranteed to be the case; meaning that you've lost nothing and can reinstall with no issue (just reconfigure your forwarders and such).


3

Just to add another tool, PDQ deploy (free) can also be used for things like this if you prefer a GUI interface. It'll also give you a status on which machines it has applied to as well, which can be handy. PDQ Deploy


3

Installers of this sort do not typically have a standard way of uninstalling themselves. You'll want to refer to any documentation that came with the installer, or perhaps take a look for any README's it installed. Some installers of that sort have an uninstall option, others install a binary/script that does the trick. Speaking particularly of Mono, ...


3

Question has been inactive for quite a while with no responses. Quoting Jscotts' comment from above as the answer since he did not respond to do so: Your standard clone should only contain the OS and apps common for all machines (MS Office, Java, Flash, etc.) department specific apps can be deployed via Group Policy, scripting or the like. "Cleaning" ...


3

I would personally take an image of the server to have a bootable copy just in case you need something at a later point then wipe it. Alternatively, take the drive out and store it somewhere, toss in another drive and enjoy a guiltless fresh installation.


3

In 2 years time when you've moved on to better things maybe, and no one either knows or can remember the details of what you've done now and where you left it at, someone's going to be really glad you finished the job properly and tidied up your AD and stopped them getting totally bizarre errors. It's the professional thing to do, so its the smart thing to ...


3

One tool I have had good luck with is the Windows Installer Cleanup Tool.


3

If you want to change the ./configure options if a package, you need to rebuild the package. The easiest way to do this is run: # apt-get install build-essential devscripts # apt-get source php5 # cd php5-* # vim debian/rules # debuild -us -uc -b You should now find the rebuild packages in the directory above the source. You can install these using "dpkg ...


3

Not all installers remove all the folders they originally created. There is a good reason for this - you may value any configuration files you changed that were stored in that folder. I'm just speculating that this is the reason whoever wrote the installer/uninstaller did it this way. It could also be a mistake, or any other reason. If it worries you, ...


3

The "easiest" way would be to use the same mechanism used to roll out the update. Most central software deployment utilities and patch management servers allow you to roll back updates (this, of course, depends on how much you trust the IE7 uninstaller, but for argument's sake, let's assume that it always works flawlessly). So, for example, if you updated ...


3

The answer to this is to pay attention to what you're doing. See also my answer to the question What are the recommended ways of defending a remote *nix install from a hamfisted admin? As I said there nothing can protect you from your own stupidity. You, being the systems administrator, are the only thing standing between your stupidity and utter disaster. ...


3

I found the solution here. UPDATED 2.11.2012 If you were smart enough and used some non-standard prefix when configured Git so that it has been installed under a specific hierarchy, like under /opt/git, then just delete that hierarchy, recursively. If not, then you could go like this: 1) Fetch the source tarball of exactly the version you built and ...


2

Sounds like you don't want to salvage anything Exchange related on the box. If so, why not forcibly remove the services using sc delete, remove any orphaned keys under HKLM\System\CurrentContolSet\Services, then blow away the HKLM\Software\Exchange and HKLM\Software\Exchange Server keys. Finally, delete the binaries from the disk. Normally, the biggest ...


2

I'd go this way: Try removing it without further options: sudo apt-get remove rabbitmq-server See if that works, if not, probably a new error message arises. If the deinstallation script expects the server to be running, it might help to start it before running the command. If it can't be started any more, I'd try to hack the script to return an exit code ...


2

try the following, # yum provides ruby or # rpm -qa | grep -i ruby This will display the RPMs that is currently installed that provides the ruby binary. Once you have the name of the rpm you can then run the follow to remove the RPM from your system # yum erase <package_name> It might be possible that the ruby rpm was installed with a ...



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