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1

You should be rate-limiting your restarts in the ./finish file for that service, which is run upon abnormal termination. The ./finish script will receive the return code from ./run and from there you can determine what to do, etc. For that matter, you should have your ./finish script screaming loudly about the failures and sending notifications and jumping ...


2

In the case where you don't have the right to run tune2fs on a device (e.g. in a corporate environment) you can try writing a single byte to a file on the partition in question and check the disk usage: echo 1 > test du -h test


0

The iowait include the network calls, i say this, because nfs is handled as many linux local filesystems from kernel point of view: vim linux-2.6.38.2/fs/nfs/file.c const struct file_operations nfs_file_operations = { .llseek = nfs_file_llseek, .read = do_sync_read, .write = do_sync_write, ...


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It does. Incidentally, one of the servers that I manage is showing experiencing high iowait which is caused by a bad NFS mount. top - 06:19:03 up 14 days, 10:15, 3 users, load average: 9.67, 11.83, 12.31 Tasks: 135 total, 1 running, 134 sleeping, 0 stopped, 0 zombie Cpu(s): 0.2%us, 0.2%sy, 0.0%ni, 0.0%id, 99.7%wa, 0.0%hi, 0.0%si, 0.0%st ...


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We encountered a similar use-case: automatically creating demo users with awful passswords, bypassing all password policies. Without further ado, here's a nasty-but-works hack based on the mailing list suggestion: Bourn shell function # example: set_password_insecure sybil magic # $1: username # $2: password set_password_insecure() { if [ -z "$1" ]; ...


1

You can try the following: create a file before the job starts and remove it, when it finished. 20 minutes after the job starts check if the file exists. If so then send a notification 00 07 * * * touch /tmp/run_trans_push.started; /u01/home/oracle/sysadm/run_trans_push.sh > /u01/home/oracle/trc/run_trans_push.sh_`date +\%b_\%d`.trc 2>&1; rm -f ...


0

I figured most of it out. I edited smb.conf file by adding shared folder and define an group with 0755 permission. And make that group owner of the sahred folder by following command: chown -R root:< the name of the group > < the directory > and as well as added an user from that group to samba: smbpasswd –a < user > Most ...


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You will first need to mount the shared folder on the server running apache, similar to the following; mount.cifs //serverwithshare/sharename /path/to/mount/on Then, assuming you are running SElinux (as is the default in CentOS 7 which you tagged your post with), you will need to allow apache to read from samba shares, like so: setsebool -P ...


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find /proc/*/fd -ls 2> /dev/null | grep '(deleted)' Find all opened file descriptors. Grep deleted. StdError to /dev/null Output: 160448715 0 lrwx------ 1 user user 64 Nov 29 15:34 /proc/28680/fd/113 -> /tmp/vteT3FWPX\ (deleted) Or you can use awk find /proc/*/fd -ls 2> /dev/null | awk '/deleted/ {print $11}'; awk ...


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In the end, I ran the controlling process in Windows and used PLINK to execute commands in Unix. Using PLINK I was able to capture console output and exit codes generated by the Unix process and process them in Windows. I set up public key based, 'password-less' authentication. Guidance on setting this up is in the PLINK documentation.


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Using date and expr can get you there i.e. X=$(expr \`date +%H\` \\* 3600 + \`date +%M\` \\* 60 + \`date +%S\`) echo $X Just expand on it to do whatever you want I realise this does not give milliseconds since epoch, but it might still be useful as an answer for some of the cases, it all depends on what you need it for really, multiply by 1000 if you ...


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You can also use sshfs to mount the resource so that your local vim is used to edit these files. Vim, in fact, can also edit remote files. The beauty of this is that you can then edit in the comfort of your own customized and familiar vim configuration. vi scp://username@example.com/path/to/file


2

Based on the documentation you quoted I find it quite clear that one is covering the entire duration from one system call to the next, while the other covers only the time within a system call. The percentage of time spent inside system calls versus the percentage of time spent outside system calls will roughly tell you if a process is CPU bound. A CPU ...


2

The time outside the system call is the time spent running your program's code before it gets to the next system call.


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The command to check the installed Operations Manager version opcsv -v


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If your server is dedicated to this single application and its requirements, then reducing the swappiness value makes sense. If, on the other hand, your server would be a shared server running lots of different applications, some of which would be only rarely used, then more swappiness would mean that the idle processes could be swapped sooner to release ...



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