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-1

Go to the archive location cd /abc/def find . -xyz 1 -type d -mtime +27 To find the 27 days older directory find . -mtime +27 -exec /bin/rm –rf {} \;


0

use Dreamweaver to find and replace using the folder settings instead of file. (search and replace in all files in a folder) you can use regex to match the lines you need to replace if the middle of each is different, if the lines are identical its not needed. but thats just going to get your site back to where it was before being hacked. once cleaned you ...


1

Well, if you want to disable the default ubuntu user (a reasonable thing to do), you will need to add another user to the system that you will use to connect via SSH. Needless to say, this second user should have sudo privileges.


-1

/usr actually means Unix System Resources source:: https://wiki.debian.org/FilesystemHierarchyStandard


1

It still exists, although these days it's called doinkd https://sourceforge.net/projects/idled/


3

There are a few things going on here. Let's break it down. Unless you've configured a reverse zone for 10.168.192.in-addr.arpa, your recursive server has to get this information from somewhere else. You have not mentioned setting up such a zone, so I will assume that it does not exist. RFC 1918 private networks are not routed on the internet. If a DNS ...


1

nslookup on an IP will look for a corresponding PTR record, which is apparently missing from your configuration. That said, I've worked for huge companies with hundreds of servers and none of them configured reverse lookups on local IPs.


0

While not the very elegant, something like this will work: $dir = "/usr/dir1" exec { "chk_${dir}_exist": command => "true", path => ["/usr/bin","/usr/sbin", "/bin"], onlyif => "test -d ${dir}" } file {"${dir}/test.txt": ensure => file, owner => 'root', group => 'root', mode => '0750', ...


0

A much simpler approach: for j in $(atq | cut -f 1); do at -c "$j"; done You could also look at each one in less in turn, which might be clearer: for j in $(atq | cut -f 1); do at -c "$j" | less; done


0

Puppet is about end state. You can ensure a file exists with the state you specify or is absent. If you need to do some branching (if) logic, Puppet supports that as well. See conditionals in the documentation - https://docs.puppet.com/puppet/latest/reference/lang_conditional.html $directory_exists = <insert logic here> if $directory_exists { file ...


0

You could use a Makefile in ~/.ssh: config: config.in config.app.in > $@ (for f in $+; do cat $$f; echo; done) | sed '$$ d' >> $@ config.app.in: (echo "# Generated with foobar.sh."; \ foobar.sh) > $@ .PHONY: config.app.in Then move your existing config to config.in and run make to generate ...



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