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3

The Time Wait state is used prevent old packets from a previous connection from being accepted into a new connection. It effectively allows enough time for old packets to "die" in the network. However, a socket in Timeout state can accept a new connection as long as the Initial Sequence Number on the SYN is higher than the last sequence number seen on the ...


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This is a bit of a hack-y answer and won't likely work for most people. It's also a huge security risk methinks, so don't do it unless you're sure you'll be safe and the inputs are sanitized and...well, you get the idea. Compile the little C program here into a binary called start (or whatever you want), then run your program as ./start your-program-here ...


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Turns out you're in luck; there is a GNU style unix program that does exactly this: bsort. bsort is a hyper efficient implementation of an inplace radix sort with careful attention paid to memory access patterns when working with files larger than ram. By efficent I mean was able to best the http://sortbenchmark.org's 2014 energy efficient 10^8 record ...


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I had the same problem using authorized_keys with permitopen. On server side, /var/log/auth.log contained: Received request to connect to host 127.0.0.1 port 10001, but the request was denied. As I use autossh to create a tunnel, I needed two ports: one for connection (10000) and one for monitoring (10001). The problem came with monitoring port. In my ...


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Perl is probably installed, so you can do timestamp=$( some process ) # timestamp=201607130319 perl -se ' use Time::Local; if ($ts =~ /^(\d{4})(\d\d)(\d\d)(\d\d)(\d\d)$/) { $time = timelocal(0,$5,$4,$3,$2-1,$1-1900); $now = time; if (abs( $time - $now ) > 600) { print "more than 10 minutes\n"; } }...


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I needed to convert line endings, as well as zip the file. The zip tool can do both at the same time: zip --to-crlf CRLF.zip LF.txt zip --from-crlf LF.zip CRLF.txt


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With POSIX awk: awk '{sub(/\r/,"")}1' CRLF.txt > LF.txt awk '{sub(/$/,"\r")}1' LF.txt > CRLF.txt


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Finally got it working. Here's the solution FNDLOAD is an OS command line executable. In order to run it we must ensure our enviroment is set up correctly in the shell, before invoking FNDLOAD. ((ChannelExec) channel).setCommand("cd path/to/env/file; . ./envFileName.env;"+ command);


2

Starting with ssh 7.3 (which is the next upcoming release as I'm writing this), an Include directive is available. Include: Include the specified configuration file(s). Multiple path names may be specified and each pathname may contain glob wildcards and shell-like "~" references to user home directories. Files without absolute paths are assumed to ...


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I saw this on another thread and liked the results. Under AIX, I used ls -l [filename] | awk '{$5=sprintf("%.3f GB", $5/1024^3)} 1' Produces the GB count with 3 decimal places Example output of ls -l /tmp/myfile: -rw-rw-rw- 1 owner group 0.530 GB Jul 8 10:33 /tmp/myfile You may opt to increase the decimal count if the file is smaller than 1 MB. ...


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No answers after 2 weeks so I expect, there is no "simple" way of achieving the goal. I want to share my ideas of how my "workaround" looks like. Maybe it'll help those facing a similar problem. Subnet A: 192.168.1.0/24 Subnet B: 192.168.2.0/24 Subnet C: 192.168.3.0/24 I added a new, separate subnet (C) which is kinda like a dmz (Because of the content ...


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You could try using awk. If the lines are all prepended by 4 fields then ...| awk '{$1=$2=$3=$4=""; print $0}' but you may need to explicitly flush the output ...| awk '{$1=$2=$3=$4=""; print $0; fflush() }' This basically nulls the first 4 fields. Note that if you then wanted to print just certain fields the first field is still $5, but then I ...


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You can try using cut to cut out the columns you are interested in. tail -f whatever | cut -d ' ' -f 3- [PROD] - INFO: GET 200 - 5ms [PROD] - INFO: POST 200 - 7ms This -d sets a space as the field delimiter, and -f specifies to display only the third and subsequent fields. Specifying fields can get more complex, too. Suppose you only really want to get ...


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Your 64-bit executable has 32 too many bits for your 32-bit operating system. You will need to run it on a 64-bit OS. Bonus information: if things were reversed and this was a 32-bit binary that you were trying to run on a 64-bit OS, it could be done trivially after ensuring that ia32-libs or equivalent was installed. Speaking frankly, though, this is 2016....


3

Assuming you are using the bash shell, take a look at pushd and popd. These are two very unsung commands that are helpful in cases like this. pushd pushes the current working directory onto a stack and then does a cd to the directory you specify. popd will then pop the top directory from that stack and cd to it. Using these your alias would be: alias ...


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Time have changed. There was a time when every system's administrator could be reached at the hostmaster address for that server. Connectivity once depended on knowing an administrator who would allow you access, and a routing map between systems was regularly published. Those days are long gone and security threats are wide-spread. The userid > 1000 ...



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