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65

Update: Microsoft has created the Windows 7 USB/DVD Download tool to make this very easy. I used this guide as a set of directions http://kurtsh.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!DA410C7F7E038D!1665.entry The steps are really longer than necessary. You need to: 1. Get a fast 4GB or larger USB Thumbdrive. 2. run cmd.exe and enter the following commands followed ...


15

I have done this only recently - works really well. I have an 8GB usb key with several ISO images on it. When I boot from the key, I get to choose which ISO to boot from. Pretty damn cool. This is all courtesy of GRUB. Instructions here: http://themudcrab.com/acronis_grub4dos.php In the example it is showing how to boot a single Acronis recovery ISO, but ...


15

Portability: the drive will be unreadable by computers running Windows 95, 98 or Me, (some)Linux, or any other non-Windows device. Longevity: NTFS will shorten the life of the drive. It is a journalling file system, which means that it logs changes, not just the end result, causing more writes to the drive. It also logs last access times for files, so even ...


13

Microsoft has a knowledge base article on this very issue (KB555324). You have to create a custom Group Policy ADM. O'Reilly has an easier to grok writeup at: http://windowsdevcenter.com/pub/a/windows/2005/11/15/disabling-usb-storage-with-group-policy.html. Hope this helps.


10

Personally I have never had a problem with data loss in XP or Vista when simply pulling a USB stick out. The key factor is to make sure data is not being written to the disk when removing it. I do reformat my USB devices to use NTFS tho, (which they typically are formated as FAT32 from the factory). Alternately you will see an icon near your PC clock to ...


10

Are you even sure if the ISO image will work on a USB device? Some ISOs which will boot if they are on a CD/DVD will not actually boot from a USB device. Assuming the ISO you want has has a bootloader that will work, then it should be as simple as dd if=filename.iso of=/dev/usbdevice but this will replace anything that is currently on the USB disk. If ...


9

We have some ESXi boxes that boot of SD/USB, it's ok, it works - nothing to write home about. But if you use SSDs with v5.0U1 it'll use the SSD as swap space for very significantly improved system performance in memory contended situations. That said you need to make sure you use HCL-compliant SSD (same as every other component) and their cost would ...


8

Well, the main advantages of NTFS over FAT32 (the usual choice for flash drives are): better for very large partitions (bigger clusters, files >2GB possible) filesystem permissions journaled, thus better crash recovery 1 & 2 only matter for very big flash drives (several GB), so not usually an issue. 3 is relevant if you frequently "forget" to do a ...


8

I found two problems with the accepted answer: It assumes the usb drive is disk 1 for DISKPART. This can be resolved by using the LIST DISK command prior to SELECT DISK # to determine the correct disk number. The usb drive did not appear as a bootable device to the target machine. This can be fixed by running the bootsect utility off the Windows ...


8

Assuming you mean pros and cons of formatting NTFS vs formatting FAT/FAT32 Pros files larger than 4Gb can be stored NTFS is a journaling file system, so it should be more robust than FAT/FAT32 more efficient use of storage (less wasted slack space when storing lots of small files) better performance in general support for ACLs and filesystem permissions ...


8

Execute sudo blkid : it will show block device names: /dev/sdc1: UUID="004A31DB4A31CDE2" LABEL="WinGamer" TYPE="ntfs" /dev/sdd1: LABEL="0DAY" UUID="9b14c03b-7251-434f-bbb9-eac42b2db927" TYPE="ext2" /dev/sdg5: LABEL="QFAT" UUID="4257-E346" TYPE="vfat" /dev/sdg6: LABEL="BACKUP-HDD" UUID="fee45c66-11bd-49fa-a62a-4a541716e8e1" TYPE="ext2"


7

There is a tool (YUMI) to achieve this. I think, it is fastest and painless way of preparing a (multi)bootable usb. You can put many systems (Windows, Linux, HBCD etc.) into one flash drive. And you can also use an external drive.


6

I know you can do this in UNetbootin gui. I haven't tried it myself, but it looks like you can do it by command-line, as well: http://sourceforge.net/apps/trac/unetbootin/wiki/commands unetbootin method=diskimage isofile="my.iso" installtype=USB targetdrive=/dev/sdc1


6

You have several questions, so here goes from top to bottom: Yes, you can reinstall ESXi on another USB and load up your VM's from the datastore. Network settings etc. will however be lost. (Maybe not if in a vCenter cluster - but I am not sure about that) I am running ESXi on 4GB USB sticks without any trouble, so I dont really know about that scratch ...


5

Can't be done sorry, as you say ESXi is happy to boot from a USB disk but won't allow a datastore to be created on one - nor should it, using one as such is an appalling idea. In fact your question history has interested me since you joined, you seem to ask lots of unusual questions that give the impression you've not received any training or read any ...


5

Do ironkey USB drives require special drivers? https://www.ironkey.com/ Edit: nope. From the FAQ, it doesn't require special software or drivers, apparently. Nor admin rights.


5

There are a bunch of reasons against this: Flash tabs are unreliable; it's not just write cycles, the damn things just like to go on holidays regularly for any reason. When people said "we need a replacement for floppy disks", they obviously included "dies regularly" in the replacement criteria. It's real easy to confuse which tab goes with which server; ...


5

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/823732 if you cant get that to work, try disabling the usb controller in the bios! make sure you use a ps2 type connector for mouse and keyboard. also physical prevention http://www.lindy.co.uk/usb-port-blocker-pack-of-4-colour-code-blue/40452.html


4

I have no concrete benchmarks, but from trying it, the answer is only when initially loading the hypervisor. I used a 8GB Very Fast USB stick, but then I needed to use it for something else so I replaced it with a cheap 2GB one that I got for free at a trade show. It boots slightly slower when actually starting ESXi, but once it is loaded and at the half ...


4

See this post for instructions for how to take stuff that's on a bootable DVD and placing it on a USB drive that's bootable. A USB Thumbdrive is just a hard drive, and if it's got the right boot files and the BIOS supports booting from an external USB hard drive it will work fine. To understand what makes a CD or DVD drive bootable see this post on the El ...


4

The classic answer is: It depends For compatibility, FAT32 is the winner only because it’s the most compatible with almost everything or every other OS out there. NTFS (obviously) isn’t compatible with everything. ExFat is supposidly only compatible with Vista but I know of some folks who have made it work with XP. As far as copying files to the USB ...


4

Try USBDeview from NirSoft. From the website: "USBDeview is a small utility that lists all USB devices that currently connected to your computer, as well as all USB devices that you previously used. For each USB device, exteneded information is displayed: Device name/description, device type, serial number (for mass storage devices), the ...


4

I think you are running afoul of the maximum power draw for a single USB device. You can chain more hubs to get more ports but you must supply more power than the computer can via the USB port to run them all. "A maximum of 5 unit loads (500mA) can be drawn from a port in USB 2.0," - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_Serial_Bus#Power Unless you ...


4

First of all when you get a new device I can recommend writing data to it and verify the data afterwards using md5sum/sha1sum/... Especially cheap USB devices tend to be broken. :( It's not that unusual that USB pens work fine on the first few (hundred) MBs but tend to dataloss on the last MBs. Sadly many users aren't aware of that and notice problems too ...


4

From Linux there's a very easy way to create a bootable memory stick from an ISO image -- and this should work for any OS. Assuming the memory stick is /dev/sdb and the image is /home/username/Downloads/system.iso. Just do this (as root): dd if=/home/username/Downloads/system.iso of=/dev/sdb Much easer than unetbootin or any other method I've heard of. ...


4

From what I remember the government sends classified information through the US Postal Service. The item must be first wrapped in plain brown wrapping probably with some tamper detect and then put in to the mailing envelope. Then the mail is sent REGISTERED with RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED and with a signature required (it might have to be sent and signed by ...


4

The lsusb command may be helpful (assuming the device is still connected). Update: The original question asked for the make/model which is not /dev/sdc that confused me (lsusb should have shown the make/model). You could use the sg_scan and sg_map commands: # sg_map /dev/sg0 /dev/sda /dev/sg1 /dev/scd0 /dev/sg3 /dev/sdc Now we know that /dev/sdc ...


3

In some circumstances having those SSD drives as local scratch drives - for particular latency-intensive tasks, caching or even swap - can be a win. The SSD solution is quite a bit more expensive than the USB. If all you're going to do with the SSD is boot, then go with the USB. Frankly, though, there are several ways to netboot VMW that work well and ...


3

hostname $(blkid | perl -lne '/LABEL="(.*?)".*vfat/ and print $1') or hostname $(blkid | perl -lne '/sda1.*LABEL="(.*?)"/ and print $1') Since you don't have Perl, your grep may not have -P. if it does, try hostname $(blkid | grep -Po 'LABEL="\K.*?(?=".*vfat)') or hostname $(blkid | grep -Po 'sda1: LABEL="\K.*?(?=".*)') For a pure Bash version: ...



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