Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

2

I can't think of any pros. The cons are: you're trying to make a RAID with disks on buses of two vastly different speeds you're trying to make a RAID with a bus that has notoriously poor low-level drive discipline options (USB) given the bandwidth limits of the USB bus, you would risk swamping the controller (particularly given that you want your spare on ...


1

This should operate correctly, but keep in mind that in most RAID configurations your performance is going to be limited by the slowest drive in your array. If you mix USB drives with your existing SATA drives, you may see your performance drop. Also, note that there is no "mdadm daemon" necessary for things to function. The mdadm tool is typically run at ...


1

It should work; mdadm works at the block device level (it is drive-type agnostic). Test it on a virtual machine setup first. Set up some lv's to model the raid array, copy the configuration, and then add the usb drive. You'll solve any problems before doing it on the real server. If mdadm starts before USB drives are configured, you can change the startup ...


1

Instead of using /dev/sd[a-z], why you don't use the Linux UUID (Universally Unique Identifier) of the disk. If you plug/unplug a disk it always keep the same UUID. Look at /dev/disk/by-uuid/ It contains symlinks to the real /dev/sd[a-z] devices. ls -l /dev/disk/by-uuid total 0 lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 10 2010-07-16 09:01 0bef51ef-8a76-4ae5-9e52-7306e57a8c9e ...


1

Presumably you have a need for these to be external disks? if so then I'd suggest taking these disks out of their USB enclosures and putting them into an eSATA enclosure or two - USB just isn't designed for this kind of thing. If you don't need them to be external then put them on an internal SATA/SAS bus. Either route should make them a lot more stable and ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible