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74

OK, after unsuccessfully trying all methods mentioned here, I finally got it working. Basically, the missing step was to write a proper boot sector to the USB stick, which can be done from Linux with ms-sys or lilo -M. This works with the Windows 7 retail version. Here is the complete rundown again: Install ms-sys - if it is not in your repositories, get ...


22

Why should the theoretical port number be limited to only seven ports? There are hubs with more ports on the market. Look at this monster example: 49-port USB hub is just plain practical


21

You can plug in that many drives via USB . . . but I wouldn't recommend it. The single biggest issue you're going to run into is the use of USB 2.0 (480Mb/sec shared across all devices on the controller). Unless you're using USB 3.0, you are going to seriously limit your disk throughput. USB was intended for temporary (hot plug) or situations where very ...


13

Plug your device in, then see syslog: $ tail -n 2 /var/log/syslog Dec 22 17:25:14 localhost kernel: [73348.931267] usb 2-3: new high speed USB device using ehci_hcd and address 13 Dec 22 17:25:14 localhost kernel: [73349.084555] usb 2-3: configuration #1 chosen from 3 choices Note the device bus id there: usb 2-3. Now get the version: $ cat ...


13

The option for the most coverage is the FAT32 file system. But you won't be able to create files larger than 4GB. If you use NTFS (Windows format) then Mac systems will be able to read it but cannot write to it unless third party software is installed. MacFuse and NTFS-3G will let you have full access to NTFS volumes on a Mac system. Update: NTFS-3G ...


13

You mean if the disk is damaged such that corrupted data is read off it that appears legitimate? That's not a "normal failure". RAID 1 protects against normal failures of a single disk. It also won't protect you if one disk catches on fire and blows up the other one. These are "abnormal failures". For example, if one disk's write hardware breaks and it ...


11

You can add a udev rule for your specific device -- to do this, create a file called /etc/udev/010custom.rules (or something similar; just make sure numerically it is the smallest in the directory). The files contents will be: BUS="usb", SYSFS{idVendor}="**IDVENDOR**", SYSFS{product}="**PRODUCT**", NAME="usb/%k", SYMLINK="DEVICE" RUN+="/path/to/your/script" ...


10

You may want to use /dev/disk/by-id or /dev/disk/by-uuid/ instead. These never change for a given device, whatever /dev/sdXX your pluggable drives have.


10

I did this a while back. The machine runs Gentoo on a RAID-5 array of 9x2GB USB drives. As the above posters noted, it's best to spread the I/O across various interfaces. That's why I have 3 drives connected to the on-board ports, 3 drives connected to a PCI USB card, and 3 drives connected to a PCI-E USB card. No hubs. Performance is really quite good! ...


9

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_Serial_Bus#Maximum_useful_distance - 5 meters for USB2. If you need to go further you can put a hub in the middle, but many devices have trouble if the distance gets too long.


9

You can accomplish this with dd. Open up a terminal, your going to need to find what device is your pendrive. If you have the drive mounted you can find the name of the device by typing "mount" and looking at it's entry. Something like the following: /dev/sdb1 on /media/USBDISK type vfat (rw,nosuid,nodev,uhelper=hal,uid=1000,utf8,shortname=mixed) In this ...


9

We use a device from AnywhereUSB to attache USB devices (including dongles) inside an ESXi virtual machine. http://www.digi.com/products/usb/anywhereusb.jsp The limitations are that when you install Windows in an ESX guest it doesn't install the USB drivers so you have to do it manually. It is a Windows only device. Also, you can't share one AnywhereUSB ...


9

THis is the answer buddy - YES: USB can be used by Guest OS by editing the settings of a Virtual Machine and then choosing the "Hardware" TAB Once you are at the HARDWARE Tab you can click "ADD" and select a USB Controller. Once you have added a USB Controller you then repeat the same process, except this tieme add a USB Device iunistead of a controller. ...


9

A "dongle" in this context is a USB or serial-based software-enabler/licensing key. The HP ProLiant ML370 G5 has an internal USB port on the motherboard Look for a small device attached to that port. See page 70 of the ML370 G5 service guide or look for something in the location noted in the following diagram: The location of the internal USB connector is ...


9

A backup to a USB connected drive is certainly better then no backup. A backup to hardware specifically designed for backups (like tapes) might be an even better choice. Can you afford to lose a weeks worth of data? If you are only swapping drives once a week, then you are risking a weeks worth of data. If the drive is connected for a week, there is a ...


8

A PowerShell script like this should do the trick. This can be called via Nagios and will return an exit code of 0 and "OK: All printers are normal" or an exit code of 2 and information about the printer(s) that have a problem. #Initialize variables $nagiosStatus = "0" $nagiosDescription = "" $detectedErrorStateDescriptions = New-Object string[] 12 ...


8

Execute sudo blkid : it will show block device names: /dev/sdc1: UUID="004A31DB4A31CDE2" LABEL="WinGamer" TYPE="ntfs" /dev/sdd1: LABEL="0DAY" UUID="9b14c03b-7251-434f-bbb9-eac42b2db927" TYPE="ext2" /dev/sdg5: LABEL="QFAT" UUID="4257-E346" TYPE="vfat" /dev/sdg6: LABEL="BACKUP-HDD" UUID="fee45c66-11bd-49fa-a62a-4a541716e8e1" TYPE="ext2"


8

Here is an article where extensive testing on usb drives comparing performance of FAT32, NTFS, and exFAT. Conclusion from the testing: "For Copying to the USB drive FAT32 took the least amount of time, with NTFS coming in second and ExFat taking on average the longest time to Copy to the drive. Copying From and Reading From the drives were very ...


7

If they're Windows desktops, you can use the local policy (or group policy, if it's Active Directory). There isnt's a default setting for it, but the MS-provided template can be found under MSKB 555324.


7

I think the main issue is power. I'm not going to look up the technical numbers and figures, but if you put too many devices on a hub, The USB port won't be able to supply enough power to all the devices. Here is a USB hub with 16 ports (8 on each side) and it uses an external power source. edit: the 13 port hub posted earlier also has an external power ...


7

If you want to do this, try to get your USB drives on separate buses - putting them all on the same bus, or on a hub, will slow down the performance of the array drastically. Good luck with this!


7

Many. Practically unlimited if the devices have their own power, though it will depend on your controllers and hubs. IIRC the USB standard allows 127 devices (with hubs counting as devices too) on each controller, directly or indirectly, but many motherboard chipsets effectively have more than one controller and you can add more via add-on cards. Some ...


7

Security tokens are tamper-resistant processors. USB flash disks are storage media. These things are, fundamentally, two different things. You're comparing apples and oranges. A security token contains a secret (private key, random number generator seed, etc) that can't (easily) be removed from the device. This tamper-resistance is the reason that the ...


7

Mounting them is not the problem: It's going to be as slow as hell. USB performance for external harddrives sucks at the best of times anyway. Everything on the same USB controller/hub shares the bandwidth. You will have to spread them out over as many separate USB controllers as possible. Most motherboards only have 1 or 2 controllers so you will have to ...


7

It's just an idea, but you can provide an external (or third-party even) backup service trough a mirror server/db. The information will be replicated at everytime you do an insert/update/transaction log/alter/create/etc., any modification. So the transactions are very little and can be on an queue if you doesn't have access or you have a limited connection ...


7

As has been mentioned in the comments, grab the disk's UUID and stick this in your fstab; UUID=66a7ba58-b1e2-4d91-9b5e-085064a954ab /stor ext4 defaults 0 0 (replace the UUID value with that of your own). As simple ls -la /dev/disk/by-uuid (which is just a collection of symlinks named the UUID of the disk which point to the real device's identifer ...


6

You can mount 10 drives on Ubuntu without any problem. BUT I think you might be better off into building a NAS system. For the price of 10 external hard drives you can get a cheap mobo/cpu with a lot of SATA ports (and if necessary just add a cheap RAID or SATA controller on the PCI(e) slots) . You will hit the limits of the USB hub. With a NAS you can ...


6

"Dongles" are usually USB thingies, which enable certain bits of very expensive software to work. It's kind of like a physical license key to ensure you can only use the software as per your license terms. If it's not plugged in to a USB port on the server, check the box or contact the delivery company - they may have found it. It will probably look like a ...


6

The main consideration is making sure the OS doesn't swap, and/or doesn't write much to the flash memory. The USB stick, like a compact flash or SD card (and to a far lesser extent, SSD) has a limited number of write cycles so if you've got something thrashing it constantly for swap you may find it wears out prematurely. The Sun X4540 systems we've got ...



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