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I've been researching the internet and since is hard to know if a device is vulnerable is better to be prepared at the other end of the USB socket and I found that actually there are some solutions: For Windows: There is a free program called G DATA USB Keyboard Guard which basically ask you to grant access when a new device is found: G DATA has ...


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You have to point to /sda1 because when you boot from USB sda is the USB, sdb is the first hard disk and so on


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Most likely in one of the cases (either sata or usb) it is using its native 4K sectors, and in the other mode it is emulating 512B sectors. There may be bios/sata controller options that help fix that. Or you can format it attached by USB if that is the intended use. There might even be a jumper on the drive to force it to always emulate 512B sectors.


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As implied by @Zoredache your premise is flawed. All USB 2.0 ports are 480mb/sec and according to this link all the USB ports are USB 2.0 - including the internal, 2 front and 2 rear ports. USB 1.x is limited to 12 megs, not USB 2.0 - see here.


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Install usbmount sudo apt-get install usbmount Allow users to access usb drives sudo sed 's/MOUNTOPTIONS="/MOUNTOPTIONS="user,umask=000,/' /etc/usbmount/usbmount.conf Plug in and use cd /media/usb touch beeblebrox You can get some More Details.


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Maybe the best thing to prevent hd sleep and firmware caching is the reading of a random sector of your disk: * * * * * bash -c 'dd if=/dev/sda of=/dev/null count=1 skip=$RANDOM' It worked just fine for me.


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The first problem that you write in UNIX style. But the UEFI uses DOS style. So your sequence of commands: map mount blk0 aaa aaa: // !!! change disk in dos stile cd EFI\debian // use backslashes grubx64.efi // run bootloader without "./" The second problem - you have nothing written about the disk partitioning system. You can`t use ...



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