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Poweshell is a great option to use and there are many scripts you can find on the internet etc... if you are not solid in powershell here is a utility you can use that is GUI based and works well to allow you to do CSV, XLS or direct modification of user accounts. Bulk AD Users by Wisesoft http://www.wisesoft.co.uk/software/bulkadusers/default.aspx


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You're best suited using powershell. There are a few good posts out there already about how to use powershell to update AD user fields. http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/windowsserver/en-US/ca04cdce-472a-4d29-a3c5-91285dc2dcd8/importcsv-to-update-active-directory-users


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The answer to this is that the debian-sys-maint account is a red-herring. The phenomena I was looking at was a MySQL "anonymous" user. This is answered by these 2 questions, as well as my own that I posted yesterday: MySQL allows entry without Password MySQL 5.5.16 allows anonymous connections Default user for MySQL


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Nope! The problem you cite here is a problem in the IPMI spec that is still not fixed as of this writing, though the spec is as clear as mud and couldn't be more oblique about admitting it. You can read all about it at http://fish2.com/ipmi/remote-pw-cracking.html but I think you already know. I can't tell what you are doing exactly, but if you want to ...


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Try something like this: sudo lsof -i -n -P | egrep sshd.*ESTABLISHED | egrep `who -a|grep pts|awk '{print $7}'|sed ':a;N;$!ba;s/\n/\\|/g'` To clarify, the objective of this command is to match the lsof hits (which show the port used) with the sessions from who with pts (extracting the PIDs from the output) in order to filter out the false positives. In ...


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Using lsof -n -i TCP:22 -a -c sshd -a -u ^root,^sshd you can get a list of sshd processes and user names with their sockets on port 22. It is skipping those owned by root or sshd because they do not correspond to logged in users. A completely different approach would be to add some commands to /etc/ssh/sshrc, which will parse $SSH_CONNECTION and log it: ...


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Connecting to the machine is the only way to manage local groups on the machine, irrespective of the method of management (powershell, MMC, vbscript...etc) If the machine is in a domain then you should have a local group that contains a domain global group that contains the AD accounts that you want.


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Quest ActiveRoles Server should cover what you're looking for. Quest ARS has a feature where you can set the expiry date for a certain user and once this date is reached, the user is automatically removed from the group. Quest ARS also has other automated features along with an enhanced audit tool. URL: Quest ActiveRoles Server Website


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There is a function in the latest version of stdlib - (https://forge.puppetlabs.com/puppetlabs/stdlib) - called 'file_line', which may help you achieve what you are aiming to do: I've not tested this, but the resource would likely look something like this: file_line { 'nis_admin_users': path => '/etc/passwd', line => '+::::::/sbin/nologin', } ...


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This is what I used: psql dbname -tc "select 'grant select on '||relname||' to readonly;' from pg_stat_user_tables" | psql dbname I feel it's more natural to do formatting and where-clauses in sql..


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Puppet will edit /etc/passwd on its own accord, when you add user resources to your manifest, such as user { 'admin1': ensure => present, uid => 1003, password => '$6$...', } Ordering of existing lines will be tricky at best. Puppet natively does not support anything like that. My advice would be to use an exec ...


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Yes, there are good reasons why Debian does not use uid 8 and gid 8 for Postfix. You could install other binaries, which use those groups and this could theoretically result in security problems, especially if they run suid mail. Postfix should use its own gid and uid for security reasons, period.


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The /etc/skel directory is what you're looking for. This directory is used as a template for new home directories.



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