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it seems the answer to your question is in the comments of the link you posted: qouting: composer config --global process-timeout 2000


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mbarthelemy answer got me halfway there, but in the end, I had to tweak a little more: In my VagrantFile, I added this to the mapping to get it to work: :linux__nfs_options => ["no_root_squash"], :map_uid => 0, :map_gid => 0


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I faced this problem too and this was my final configuration that allowed me to ssh into my vagrant machine from anywhere in my host machine. Vagrantfile: ... # Setting up private_network to have virtual host config.vm.network :private_network, ip: "192.168.33.10" # Enable ssh forward agent config.ssh.forward_agent = true ... ssh into machine: ssh ...


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You can also add this into your Vagrantfile: ansible.verbose = "vvv" this would need to go where you're kikcing off the provisioning, like this: config.vm.provision "ansible" do |ansible| ansible.verbose = "vvv" end This sets the verbose option of ansible: -v, --verbose verbose mode (-vvv for more, -vvvv to enable ...


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It only seems to edit the file to insert placemarkers. I'd submit a ticket on Github and say that you'd like the behaviour changed, see what response you get. EDIT: Was feeling generous - https://github.com/mitchellh/vagrant/issues/4148 :)


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Adding to what's been said by @nonsenz, If you use puphpet.com's provisioning scripts then you can add a bash file to the /puphpet/files/startup-always folder and place all your commands in there. Anytime vagrant starts or reloads it will call the script: mysql.sh #!/bin/bash echo "Updating mysql configs in /etc/mysql/my.cnf." if [ sudo sed -i ...


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I had this issue. For me it turned out that the version of the box was set to "Ubuntu (32 bit)". Changing this to "Ubuntu (64 bit)" under Settings/General via the VirtualBox GUI fixed it. This appears to be a miss-configuration of the box image. If this is not case for you, starting the box with GUI enabled or through the VirtualBox interface is the best ...


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I had the same problem and filed this issue against vagrant: https://github.com/mitchellh/vagrant/issues/4100 It looks like the problem is due to some goofy behavior of Ruby's Pathname.join on Windows. You should be able to solve the problem and get your box running by setting config.vm.box_url to what you have as config.vm.box, and setting config.vm.box ...


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SOLVED! For some reason, the vm was not booting at all, I mean the OS. I added the "vb.gui = true" and just enter the boot option... the default one, from the grub boot menu :) See here on how to use this config option: https://docs.vagrantup.com/v2/virtualbox/configuration.html


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Okay so it appears I ran into two different problems. The largest problem was that although I had a module that I created called "hieraconfig" which would copy my precreated hiera.yaml and common.json files to /etc/puppet, the jboss module which calls hiera was being executed first (although I included it after hieraconfig in manifest - see below). I tried ...


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Vagrant's built-in provisioning features should be a perfect fit for this. There are a whole bunch of ways you could do it, but the simplest is probably to take the guts of your Upstart script and make them a plain shell script. Then, put one of these blocks in your Vagrantfile: Using an "inline" script. Vagrant will copy the contents from the ...


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Vagrant is, at its core, a way to quickly and reproducibly fire up virtual machines. There's no requirement to tie it to a single software project. Setting up a development environment for more than one project will work just fine.


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The default private key ships with Vagrant, so there are no additional steps either. Just use the corresponding public key in the VM. Adding and shipping a custom key might only make sense when you control the distribution of the box, and don't want anyone else to be able to log in to running instances. Even in that case I would probable install and ...


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Firstly, do I understand the "new" (non-import) way of calling multiple manifests correctly, in that a directory is to be pointed to in which all the *.pp files inside it will be executed? Yes, you do. See here: If you’re using the main manifest heavily instead of relying on an ENC, consider changing the manifest setting to $confdir/manifests. ...


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Vagrant is a Virtual Machine Manager - I would use that for creating and managing your VM's. Ansible is intended for Configuration Management of machines - virtual or otherwise. You could use Ansible to create VM's, then provision them, I suppose - Ansible has a shell module that you can use for anything - or use something like this. But Vagrant is a ...


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As @sciurus suggested I asked that on GitHub and this I the answer I got: The issue is a permissions thing on your temp folder on your system. We're going to add detection for this in an upcoming version of Vagrant. https://github.com/mitchellh/vagrant/issues/4020#issuecomment-45929445


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You shouldn't be using meteor run to host your application in any environment where you'd be using Upstart to manage the process. meteor run is a development-only server, and is very inefficient. Take a look at https://github.com/onmodulus/demeteorizer - you can use it to convert your Meteor.js app into a 'vanilla' Node.js app with a package.json, which ...



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