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30

Dropbox uses a binary diff algorithm to break down all files into blocks, and only upload blocks that it doesn't already have in the cloud. All of this is done locally on your computer. Dropbox doesn't just use your files that you have already uploaded, it aggregates everyone's files into one database of blocks, and checks each local block hash against ...


8

For what it's worth, Dropbox claims to create hashes on every 4MB of each file. That way, if you change a contiguous 2MB of a 100MB file, it will likely only need to upload 4MB (or 8MB if you cross into a second 4MB block) to re-sync the file. The hashes we use are only for the 4MB file chunks Source: http://forums.dropbox.com/topic.php?id=5502


6

It depends on your business and your level of paranoia. It's much safer, albeit more expensive, to issue laptops with a VPN connection. Real quick... Some Risks: Former employees potentially have access to business data after employment has been terminated. You as the business MUST be in control of the accounts if you don't want some disgruntled ...


5

I would tread very carefully here. Dropbox enables an extension to another computer's hard drive. That extension is worse than a USB key in the sense that infections on one PC can get onto all the other PCs using that share much more easily than with a USB key. Virus/trojan/bot writers don't target dropbox (yet) but if they decide to, then you've got a ...


5

If you wrap your file systems using LVM, then you can create a snapshot volume using the underlying logical volume layer. It's a pretty simple process and surprisingly effective for standard "snapshotty" things, such as backup and undoing rm -fr oopsies.


5

ZFS does this, but it is not a file-level deduplication. It's two better: block level deduplication (the intermediary between block and file deduplication being byte deduplication). On Linux, there is SDFS; however ZFS has some better features like the ability to use a solid state drive as a hash table store so you're not eating up enormous amounts of RAM ...


4

If you can live with timed backups rather than per save version control, Windows Server 2003 and later have a feature called volume shadowcopy. You allocate space (or a separate disk) and a schedule which will snapshot the filesystem and retain as much as it can based on the space you have allocated. Plenty of tutorials out there on how to do this. Here you ...


4

MVCC isn't what you're looking for. It sounds like you want to be able to query data based on a "point in time" to results based on the state of the data at that specified point in time. That's a temporal database schema. You can design a relational database schema for temporal queries, but SQL itself makes some types of temporal queries very cumbersome. ...


4

Paranoia???? Dude.. Step away from the network.. SLOWLY.. With your hands away from the Keyboard.. DO IT NOW!!! File share cloud based "consumer" solutions like Dropbox, are not meant for Business or Corporations. Microsoft said it best with Skydrive when they came out and said, that these types of products are not, and should not be used for Business ...


4

Puppet has no concept of VCS versions for its modules and manifests. It will simply use the files that are stored in the correct place and there is no way to require a specific version for a client. Instead of this, you can work with Puppet environments and only deploy the new version of a module to e.g. the testing environment and test it with clients ...


4

Yes, you can browse the CentOS software repositories which contain only the software distributed by CentOS. CentOS 5: http://mirror.centos.org/centos-5/5/os/x86_64/CentOS/ http://mirror.centos.org/centos-5/5/updates/x86_64/RPMS/ CentOS 6: http://mirror.centos.org/centos-6/6/os/x86_64/Packages/ ...


3

There are various options, starting with Shane Madden's suggestion: rdiff-backup rsnapshot Unison Or if you prefer graphical utilities: Back in Time Areca Backup luckyBackup All are designed to implement rsync incremental/snapshot results. If you want to roll your own script (which isn't hard), read up on the --link-dest option to rsync.


3

Dropbox recently admitted that they don't use SSL for transferring file metadata between mobile clients and their servers. They do this on purpose, for performance reasons. They don't state anywhere on their website that they do this. You can read about it here: https://grepular.com/Dropbox_Mobile_Less_Secure_Than_Dropbox_Desktop


3

They are XML-based but still compressed to ZIP files making them binary as far as SharePoint is concerned. Considering that SharePoint doesn't recognise the Office 2007 formats unless you configure them yourself or install the Microsoft Filter Pack, it looks like this feature wasn't ready for SharePoint 2007 RTM.


3

You could implement SharePoint - Foundation is the free edition for Server 2008 x64, Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 would work on Server 2003. You could also buy SP Server; you asked for possibilities but don't mention your budget. You can require check-in/check-out and implement version tracking on given documents or sites. Edit - it looks like you're ...


3

I don't think there is a specific limit. The only limit I see is that the revisions are kept for 30 days unless you have the pack-rat subscription.


2

Block level backup is your only real hope. Put your filesystems on top of LVM or a hardware array and then create a snapshot under the filesystem to backup from. Or use dump/dd on the live block device and hope you get something consistent. FWIW, typical enterprise storage (i.e. NetApp) doesn't normally backup the snapshots of the filesystem - if you're ...


2

You can use WMI queries to get a list of installed software if it used MSI to install itself. Something like this: strComputer = "." Set objWMIService = GetObject("winmgmts:" _ & "{impersonationLevel=impersonate}!\\" _ & strComputer & "\root\cimv2") Set colSoftware = objWMIService.ExecQuery _ ("Select * from Win32_Product") For ...


2

It's also important to highlight that it doesn't upload your whole file at once when you change it. For example, if you have an unique file weighting 2GB, let's say for an encrypted disk drive you hold (like when you use truecrypt or pgpdisk), and you change just a couple of files inside the encrypted disk, dropbox will only upload the blocks that ...


2

The Apache Software Foundation, as far as I know, does not use any binary patching system. Each time a new release is done, the relevant files are packaged, the obtained package is signed, uploaded to release mirrors, and is ready to be downloaded by users. Apache httpd (the web Apache server) does not usually provide a binary distribution at all, but only ...


2

There're 2 problems: manage cookbook versions in different environment objects manage recipe version in node run_list. The article Essentials of cookbook versions is the best reference for cookbook versions. According to #1, you're right because it's a tough job to manage different version of cookbooks to serve different configuration set especially it's ...


2

It wasn't long after I started using Chef in earnest that I was coming up against these same issues. I only came to some sense of sanity when I started doing four things operationally. Note that these may not be considered "best practices" by some in the Chef community. Nonetheless, this is how I brought sanity, repeatability, and order to my world. Create ...


2

/Edit : Tony is correct. Netware's filesystem had this, and so does VMS, but Windows doesn't have versioning, which is what you're asking for. You could use SharePoint with checkin/checkout and versioning to get this, however. My original answer for your question about access to the UI for "previous versions" : The answer is right in the article you ...


2

How about something like rdiff-backup?


2

I think they're working on a version for companies to use internally, with more security, but meanwhile, the files aren't encrypted on their servers, so you do have to trust them. Other than that, I can't see other security risks specific to Dropbox (like information leakage).


2

If the uploaded content is all in one directory, I can see two ways. Make the uploaded directory a symlink is version control. Have that symlink point to the destination directory for actual uploads. Setup an Alias in your website config to point to the actual directory that is outside the normal webroot. The first method requires no real code changes, ...


2

After 8 years of searching I found the SVNFS by Marco R. Gazzetta (which is different from older project with the same name by John Madden [which one does different things]). This SVNFS uses svn transparently in r/w operations: Instead of creating a file system that does its own versioning, I used an existing versioning tool, subversion, and made its ...


1

You can check gitfs. It's a FUSE filesystem based on git, pretty stable and super easy to use. Basically, it's an overlay over git. Whenever you update a file or directory it create a commit with that change (knows to batche the commits so you don't end up with 100 commits when you unzip an archive). Also knows to sync your remote and merge the conflicts ...


1

Go to an rpm search site like this one, click Search / Advanced Search and then you can tick the distributions you wish to query against.



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