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26

I currently develop online streaming from 3 miniDV cameras connected via FireWire, which is quite similar to your needs. Quick hint: vlc + flowplayer/jw player First of all, there are two video formats, that you can use in online streaming: FLV and h264. FLV is easier to transcode, h264 has better size/quality ratio but transcoding is much more cpu ...


19

Wow, well, what you want is called Emergency Management Services (EMS) redirection. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff542282(v=vs.85).aspx And it works on modern versions of Windows. In XP/2003, enabling it would look like bootcfg /ems on /port com1 /baud 9600 /id 1 On Windows Vista/2008+ it is enabled by typing the following command where ...


11

I was able to verify that it's working using rtmpdump found here: http://all-streaming-media.com/record-video-stream/rtmpdump-freeware-console-RTMP-downloading-application.htm Usage: rtmpdump -r "rtmp://example.fcod.llnwd.net/a1111/e11/test/example/file.flv" -o test.flv


7

I build IPTV systems and you're not going to like it but you've got a very tough task ahead of you, especially considering your budget. Let's go through it step by step (I'm aiming this answer to a broader audience than just you if you don't mind); The first thing anyone building such a system has to do is define its customers in terms of locations, OSs, ...


6

Axis does some pretty good products. Camera is controlled by an internal webserver, on which you also follow the feed live. You can have some examples of this webserver by googling "Live view - / - AXIS" (with quotes) or "indexFrame.html axis" (without quotes).


5

No - I'd recommend against hosting the videos yourself directly, as plenty of much more specialized companies will happily do that for you. Host the videos on YouTube or Vimeo, and embed them in your pages.


4

This is going to cost you a shedload, but basically, you either need a huge SSD array, or a huge tiered storage array. There's a bunch of SAN vendors who'll be able to provide you something to meet your requirements, but basically you need: Many SATA disks, for storage capacity, fronted by SAS 15k disks, or SAS SSDs, for quick access storage. All provided ...


4

Yes, UDP over a VPN is possible, but no, that wouldn't change a thing. Although the underlying transport may be reliable, the UDP has been designed not to retransmit lost packets. If you really have a problem with packetloss, either switch to TCP for transport, fix it by making the application send UDP packets slower, or increase the bandwidth on the path ...


4

You can set the start and end parameters as part of the url http://www.example.com/video.mp4?start=15&end=600 Which should start the video at 0 and let it run for 10 minutes. It may be better to use a preview link and some server side rewriting though as the above could easily be adjusted manually. Enable url rewriting by having "mod_rewrite" as ...


4

Let me get this straight. Inputs: Live video (cameras), display messages (advertising), and recorded video, adding titles Outputs: 4-8 video screens. Controlled across the LAN. Right. All of this is possible. There's hardware and software to do it. It's not cheap. There's no open-source / free software alternatives that do all of the things you ...


3

Take a look at VLC. It is capable of streaming in different formats and of course also of playing - either streamed or locally present video data. We've set up something with similar requirements a while ago - VLC was fetching MPEG2 stream data from several network web cams connected over a rather narrow WAN link and re-streamed it to the internet (i.e. ...


3

If the issue is packet loss, then no, VPN will only make the issue worse. One instance where I have noticed VPN helping things, though, is an instance where the site router is under-provisioned or misconfigured and is bumping up against the max size for its NAT state tracking table. Since VPNs encapsulate everything into a single TCP stream (or they just ...


3

Yes, remove it from the web server and store it on another device. Store it on a ZFS volume and utilize its deduplication features so that you're not using up expensive storage and you also have a robust, error resistant filesystem. Yes, you can use Amazon / cloud storage. Nothing "wrong" with that, but there is an expense to that solution that will become ...


3

You might be able to open up a "network location" via VLC player.


3

Red5 and Adobe FMS (they're very similar products) are exactly what this is designed for. You can also stream from those products directly into a Flash player via RMTP, so you don't need to have your clients have VLC installed. Basically, Red5 would accept the stream from the webcam (appropriate streaming software would need to be on the webcam machine, as ...


3

We recently set up a webcam solution to look around our lobby. It's a Sony SNC-RZ25N. We mounted it on a pole (you can also mount it upside down on the ceiling) and we let people control the camera from our website. We chose it because: 18X optical zoom Limit camera usage to configured business hours Limit how long individuals can control the camera (we ...


3

Are you looking to set up your own system? If you aren't set on that, there are already some great services out there to stream your own live video from a webcam. Two of the best are: Ustream.tv Qik These both work by streaming video from a client via a flash applet, and allow you to embed the video to your website. You could write this all from ...


3

Red5 is an open source flash media streaming server that supports several codecs and live stream publishing written in Java. VideoLAN (better known for their specific project VLC - VideoLAN Client) also does live streaming, though I'm not sure to what degree it's considered a good public-facing internet streamer. I know people use it for that, I just don't ...


3

Multicast, by it's nature, is broadcast based in the sense that the multicast stream is flooded to all switch ports in the same VLAN or broadcast domain. The hosts that have subscribed to and are interested in that stream will then listen to that stream, all other hosts ignoring it. The way to "solve" this "broadcast problem" is to configure IGMP snooping.


3

CDNs are generally pretty shady about what exact features they support. You'll need to contact them directly and ask whether they'll do what you want, and then figure out which one fits your use-case and budget best. It turns out that byte-range is a HTTP header for flash pseudo-streaming. I've done some googling about, and found a few articles that ...


3

This is expected behaviour. Multicast is a function of routing, so that a client can add itself to a multicast group and traffic will be routed its way. The server isn't likely acting as a router with regards to IGMP and of course it has no idea if anyone is subscribed or not. However, it would be perfectly legitimate (and advisable) for the first hop ...


3

I would first seek a legal agreement with your landlord (if this is a rental property) or your college (if this is a dorm situation) and get an easement. I am skeptical of the legality of you just stringing Ethernet cable across someone else's property. No one on this site can actually help you with legal advice, however. Yes, SSH, when used properly, will ...


3

This fully depends why and where the packet loss is. Some examples: Your ISP "optimizes" the traffic and downgrades your UDP traffic. In this case a VPN would help unless the ISP downgrades also the VPN traffic. You don't have enough bandwidth to handle the traffic. In this case a VPN would not help.


2

OBVIOUSLY Not - because the data will come from where the video is hosted (in this case youtube) and not your server, with the exception of the tiny piece of additional HTML code that you have to embedd the video.


2

Best guess is the browser will download it twice, and any optimization avoiding the second download would be very browser specific. However, this should be an easy enough thing to test, and I've just now done that :) With Firefox browser and JW Player, the video is loaded twice concurrently. Neither the browser nor flash is smart enough to optimize this ...


2

The packets never reach eth3 as 192.168.10.2 is the machine itself. Also the duplicated packets still have the destincation ip-address 192.168.1.2. You need to TEE them to a machine in 192.168.10.0/24 for example 192.168.10.254 so that the duplicates actually get routed over eth3. iptables -t mangle -A PREROUTING -p udp --dport 6000 -j TEE --gateway ...


2

You told the server to bind to port 100. On UNIX systems such as Mac OS X and Linux, ports below 1024 can only be listened to by the root user. To resolve the issue, use one of the following two solutions: Select a different port for the server, which is 1024 or higher. Run the server as the root user, e.g. with sudo. (Not recommended)


2

There's no such thing as HTTP Steaming. There are a couple of hacks to simulate it however. First and oldest is using the Range: header to specify what chunk of the file the client wants. There's nothing stopping a PHP script from sending the correct chunk based on that header, it just has to read in the header and return the proper response header with ...


2

A few thoughts; What's your client software, this is very important, specific versions on specific OSs - this will define your streaming software. What are your stream profiles, do you intend to pre-encode or do you have/expect-to cross-encode on the fly? Have you done your maths on average and burst bandwidth requirements for this, is your top end figure ...



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