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24

I currently develop online streaming from 3 miniDV cameras connected via FireWire, which is quite similar to your needs. Quick hint: vlc + flowplayer/jw player First of all, there are two video formats, that you can use in online streaming: FLV and h264. FLV is easier to transcode, h264 has better size/quality ratio but transcoding is much more cpu ...


7

I build IPTV systems and you're not going to like it but you've got a very tough task ahead of you, especially considering your budget. Let's go through it step by step (I'm aiming this answer to a broader audience than just you if you don't mind); The first thing anyone building such a system has to do is define its customers in terms of locations, OSs, ...


6

Axis does some pretty good products. Camera is controlled by an internal webserver, on which you also follow the feed live. You can have some examples of this webserver by googling "Live view - / - AXIS" (with quotes) or "indexFrame.html axis" (without quotes).


4

Let me get this straight. Inputs: Live video (cameras), display messages (advertising), and recorded video, adding titles Outputs: 4-8 video screens. Controlled across the LAN. Right. All of this is possible. There's hardware and software to do it. It's not cheap. There's no open-source / free software alternatives that do all of the things you ...


4

You can set the start and end parameters as part of the url http://www.example.com/video.mp4?start=15&end=600 Which should start the video at 0 and let it run for 10 minutes. It may be better to use a preview link and some server side rewriting though as the above could easily be adjusted manually. Enable url rewriting by having "mod_rewrite" as ...


4

This is going to cost you a shedload, but basically, you either need a huge SSD array, or a huge tiered storage array. There's a bunch of SAN vendors who'll be able to provide you something to meet your requirements, but basically you need: Many SATA disks, for storage capacity, fronted by SAS 15k disks, or SAS SSDs, for quick access storage. All provided ...


3

Red5 and Adobe FMS (they're very similar products) are exactly what this is designed for. You can also stream from those products directly into a Flash player via RMTP, so you don't need to have your clients have VLC installed. Basically, Red5 would accept the stream from the webcam (appropriate streaming software would need to be on the webcam machine, as ...


3

We recently set up a webcam solution to look around our lobby. It's a Sony SNC-RZ25N. We mounted it on a pole (you can also mount it upside down on the ceiling) and we let people control the camera from our website. We chose it because: 18X optical zoom Limit camera usage to configured business hours Limit how long individuals can control the camera (we ...


3

Red5 is an open source flash media streaming server that supports several codecs and live stream publishing written in Java. VideoLAN (better known for their specific project VLC - VideoLAN Client) also does live streaming, though I'm not sure to what degree it's considered a good public-facing internet streamer. I know people use it for that, I just don't ...


3

Are you looking to set up your own system? If you aren't set on that, there are already some great services out there to stream your own live video from a webcam. Two of the best are: Ustream.tv Qik These both work by streaming video from a client via a flash applet, and allow you to embed the video to your website. You could write this all from ...


3

Take a look at VLC. It is capable of streaming in different formats and of course also of playing - either streamed or locally present video data. We've set up something with similar requirements a while ago - VLC was fetching MPEG2 stream data from several network web cams connected over a rather narrow WAN link and re-streamed it to the internet (i.e. ...


3

If the issue is packet loss, then no, VPN will only make the issue worse. One instance where I have noticed VPN helping things, though, is an instance where the site router is under-provisioned or misconfigured and is bumping up against the max size for its NAT state tracking table. Since VPNs encapsulate everything into a single TCP stream (or they just ...


3

Yes, remove it from the web server and store it on another device. Store it on a ZFS volume and utilize its deduplication features so that you're not using up expensive storage and you also have a robust, error resistant filesystem. Yes, you can use Amazon / cloud storage. Nothing "wrong" with that, but there is an expense to that solution that will become ...


3

Multicast, by it's nature, is broadcast based in the sense that the multicast stream is flooded to all switch ports in the same VLAN or broadcast domain. The hosts that have subscribed to and are interested in that stream will then listen to that stream, all other hosts ignoring it. The way to "solve" this "broadcast problem" is to configure IGMP snooping.


3

CDNs are generally pretty shady about what exact features they support. You'll need to contact them directly and ask whether they'll do what you want, and then figure out which one fits your use-case and budget best. It turns out that byte-range is a HTTP header for flash pseudo-streaming. I've done some googling about, and found a few articles that ...


3

This is expected behaviour. Multicast is a function of routing, so that a client can add itself to a multicast group and traffic will be routed its way. The server isn't likely acting as a router with regards to IGMP and of course it has no idea if anyone is subscribed or not. However, it would be perfectly legitimate (and advisable) for the first hop ...


3

I would first seek a legal agreement with your landlord (if this is a rental property) or your college (if this is a dorm situation) and get an easement. I am skeptical of the legality of you just stringing Ethernet cable across someone else's property. No one on this site can actually help you with legal advice, however. Yes, SSH, when used properly, will ...


2

If you are referring to the Microsoft Media Server (MMS) protocols, I do not believe there are Open Source streaming servers available. In Windows Media Services 2008, support was dropped for MMS in favor of RTSP. Fortunately, this is supported outside of Windows. There is a list of Server Implementations that include Darwin Streaming Server and VideoLAN. ...


2

I do video to >500k people per day and what you're planning with bankrupt you or have your hosting company shut your site down within days - most likely both. As Antoine states you will have to use a dedicated server for this and you also need to discuss this level of bandwidth with your hosting company - they may be able to offer you a much better deal if ...


2

A few thoughts; What's your client software, this is very important, specific versions on specific OSs - this will define your streaming software. What are your stream profiles, do you intend to pre-encode or do you have/expect-to cross-encode on the fly? Have you done your maths on average and burst bandwidth requirements for this, is your top end figure ...


2

Based on section 6.3.6 of the draft submitted to the IETF, all you'd need to do is pass each file through AES-128-CBC, which can be easily done via a small web-facing script (PHP's passthru(), for example) and the "openssl" command-line interface to OpenSSL. Actual level of sanity involved in attempting this, on the other hand, is still open for debate. ...


2

If you need a streaming server, you can use Darwin Streaming Server


2

Firstly, ffmpeg is the tool of choice for this. It's CPU-intensive because that's the nature of encoding video or audio. You can simply rip the stream (assuming original mp3 audio is in the stream) from the track and save it. I've used this bash snippet before for directories of *.flv files: #!/bin/bash for i in *.flv; do ffmpeg -i "$i" -acodec copy ...


2

You use above H/W for streaming you use CentOS visit following link for the setup http://studyhat.blogspot.com/2010/02/darwin-streaming-server-on-rhelfedora.html http://studyhat.blogspot.com/2010/02/straming-server-linux.html


2

What they're asking for is Windows Media Services, an add-on for Windows Server that allows it to handle streaming media. WMS is available for both Server 2003 and 2008/2008R2. Both allow streaming live events, streaming pre-recorded files, and download-and-play. Live streaming is handled by a recording device somewhere in the field pushing to the server, ...


2

Without knowing the streaming protocol it is hard to recommend a specific solution. If it is a Flash-based service, there are some solutions here. If not, and depending on if it is supported, you could use VLC from the commandline to spawn a bunch of clients. If you disable actually displaying the stream, you should be able to launch many clients per host ...


2

My tool of choice here would be vlc. It is not just a multi-purpose multi-format video player, it is also capable of streaming in a magnitude of file formats and streaming protocols. As a bonus, it works cross-platform among Windows and Linux hosts. We've set up something similar a couple of years ago where a customer using a narrow-bandwidth DSL line (128 ...


2

A hosted streaming service, maybe even using a CDN, seems like a good idea here: http://www.streamzillacdn.com/. A Google search for "hosted streaming plan" would bring up more providers, if necessary.


2

No, Redirect means "make anotehr request". It is up to the client to implement (and the server to support) TCP keepalive between http requests, but it is totally out of the control of the server telling the client to get lost (i.e. redirecting him to some other server).



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