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The command dommemstat can give you memory stats for a specific domain and with domstats you can get plenty of stats for all domains or just the specified. You can pass the parameter --cpu-total to see the total in the moment. virsh # domstats --cpu-total That command will give you the CPU stats for the domain. If you have virt-manager you can see live ...


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Your proftpd.conf for this would, I think, look something like this: <IfModule mod_sftp.c> # Virtual host configuration for server A <VirtualHost a.a.a.a> Port 22 SFTPEngine on SFTPHostKey /path/to/key/A # Restrict members of group A to this directory DefaultRoot /path/to/directoryA groupA </VirtualHost> # ...


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Here is my hacky version. Ideas how to improve it, are welcome: List the amount of RAM in kiB every VM needs: hypervisor5:~ # for dom in $(virsh list --all --name); do echo $(virsh dumpxml $dom | sed -nre 's/^.*>([0-9]*)<.currentMemory.*$/\1/p') $dom ; done| sort -n 524288 testfoo 2146304 x131 3121152 y114 3121152 foo 4096000 y123 4194304 mac-test ...


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Option 4: Run multiple intsances/nodes on the same machine. This is like options 2 and 3 except it's simpler because there's no virtualization or containerization. It's all running natively on the host. Here's a list of caveats and recommendations when doing so (from here). Max heap size for each node instance should be < 32Gb. This is because a ...


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2 and 3 are the best options because docs suggest a 32GB of maximum assigned memory for each node.


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Mind that if you fully virtualize the file server without VT-d-like technologies and proper hardware, this will have no access to HDD SMART info, so consider what kind of reliability do you need.


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You can install oVirt on CentOS to have a web GUI you can use to manager your virtual machines. You will need an oVirt Engine to manager the nodes, so this would be the first thing you setup. Next you'd configure the oVirt software on the CentOS node and add it to the Engine. You can follow the instructions at the oVirt website: ...


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If you want to be really safe and not overcommit memory, an alternative is to enable huge pages on your host and make your virtual machines use them. The downside is that you really need to have all the memory you need - host memory and VM memory will be basically separated. You can have better control over how huge pages are used if you disable anonymous ...


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VMDKs are performing very good and I haven’t seen almost any difference between VMDK and RDM. Of course, you have to pay attention to the type of provisioning since Eager Zero vs Lazy Zero VMDKs performance differs a lot https://communities.vmware.com/thread/436685?start=0 If you need some virtualized storage shared or mirrored between hosts you can use an ...


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RDM lets the storage array do things like do array level snapshots of volumes. Maybe only useful for large databases, but it is still in use. Its a question of functionality, whether you use more storage features at the virtualization level or the array level.


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The documentation is your friend. The virsh sub-command domuuid will return the uuid of the provided domain-name or domian-id. The sub-command domid returns the id when provided the domain-name or domain-uuid of a running machine. The sub-command domname gives domain-name when provided with a domain-uuid or domain-id. Note that the domid sub-command is ...


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There's no much point in using RDM these days unless your VM is sort of a "controller" VM and it uses ZFS or similar to aggregate multiple individual physical disks into single unified namespace. Think about Nutanix for example. For all other cases VMDK is just as well I/O performing as RDM but RDM-x doesn't support at least some nice features and has issues ...


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As the Redhat documentation you linked about overcommitting memory says, "Guest virtual machines running on a KVM hypervisor do not have dedicated blocks of physical RAM assigned to them. Instead, each guest virtual machine functions as a Linux process where the host physical machine's Linux kernel allocates memory only when requested." This makes the ...


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An additional method is the standalone Network Emulator Toolkit (NEWT), which despite it's age is quite capable and works for x86 and x64 Windows operating systems. https://blog.mrpol.nl/2010/01/14/network-emulator-toolkit/ Using the included XML templates with the installer, you can quickly get up and running on simulating latency, bandwidth, jitter, and ...


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Public bridging If you have only one NIC on the KVM host and you want to have access for the VMs to main network attached to eth0 interface you have to setup a public network bridge on top of your physical network interface (eth0 in the example): Without bridging you have something similar in /etc/network/interfaces: # The loopback network interface auto ...


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Your easiest solution would be to set up a third server (another virtual machine will do fine as long as it has enough storage available) to act as an iSCSI server, offering one or more of its disks as iSCSI targets; this can be easily done both on Windows (since Server 2012) and Linux. Once you have created your iSCSI target(s), you can connect both your ...


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You may use one of the following solution: VMware should give you this functionality out the box: http://blogs.vmware.com/apps/2015/02/say-hello-vmotion-compatible-shared-disks-windows-clustering-vsphere.html Starwinds will create a virtual shared storage for your own use with some limitations: https://www.starwindsoftware.com/starwind-virtual-san-free And ...


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This is not quite as impossible as it appears. Homomorphic encryption systems allow computational operations to be performed on encrypted data without decrypting it first. However, it doesn't seem to be particularly practical (at least so far) for general usage. For one thing, even the "fully" homomorphic cryptosystems that've been developed so far only ...


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In short, no. By definition, the host has access to all of the data that the guest has access to. That includes memory, disk, network buffers, CPU cache, etc. The guest needs to keep the decryption key available so it can read encrypted blocks (typically in RAM), where it could be easily read by the host. To echo the comment above, if you don't trust ...


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Having problems with the VirtualBox built-in converter (Hyper-V would not open the disks), I had better success with Disk2vhd from Microsoft SysInternals - just run the EXE inside the VM you want to migrate. Detailed instructions at https://hyperv.veeam.com/blog/how-to-convert-physical-machine-hyper-v-virtual-machine-disk2vhd/ Cons You do need to run ...


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Yes, it would appear quite the same as a non-virtualized, native Word. There are ways to spot it as virtualized. First you could look at the image path. Where the winword.exe is loaded from. If it is virtualized it would run from under C:\ProgramData\App-V\ (default location at least). You can also identify it as virtualized by App-V is to look at loaded ...


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To revert to the original, you simply pick "revert to current snapshot" from the right click menu, assuming you only have the one snapshot. In VMware, you can do two things with a snapshot (I'm simplifying somewhat); 1) go back to "prior state" (the way it was BEFORE the snapshot), which is the "revert to current snapshot". In this approach the term ...


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I just re-read the "tips on writing great answers" so I will try to add some information here. I know this is a really old thread, but many of us many of us have old systems we are required to support. To answer the very specific question; YES, you can run Hyper-V with Server 2003 as the HOST. I know it's not a Role or a Feature, but here's how you can do ...



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