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0

Sharing socket file through network file system won't work, as Windows socket and Linux socket are entirely different beasts — Linux inside VM would not know how to use Windows sockets. To make sure VM can utilize authentication agent on host, one needs to enable agent forwarding on both ssh client and server, then ssh into VM via host (not directly ...


1

In most cases this is Firewall who is causing troubles. Try to turn it off on the host and virtual machine and ping it again, than if it helps, turn it back on and configure Firewall rules accordingly.


2

KVM is just the hypervisor itself. It allows overcommitment without any artificial limit. The limits are provided by any management tools installed on top of KVM, such as OpenStack.


1

To view the XML config file: virsh xmldump [domain-id, domain-name or domain-uuid] To edit the XML config file: virsh edit [domain-id, domain-name or domain-uuid] Source


2

Every system has a hostname, it is given by the administrator when the system is installed/set up. It is used by all installed network-related software to identify the machine . To get the current set hostname, you can just call hostname or look in /etc/hosts, as the hostname always points to localhost. The hostname is essential as all network related ...


1

AFAIK you cannot make ESXi to wait for a VM to start before mounting the datastores. I may be wrong though. The datastores are mounted way before any VM can boot up. In general iSCSI connects right away if you do a rescan on the iSCSI sw adapter after your storage VM boots up (and rescan it works way better than NFS, where if it gets disconnected/inactive ...


0

You could theoretically boot to VMWare Player (sorry, Workstation if it's for commercial use because licenses), make a Windows VM with an ISO, do your configuration, and create a system image backup within the VM. Remove the system backup from the VM, use it over on the server. I don't know about driver issues but a few people have reported issues with the ...


3

There are a few ways. In disk manager in Windows you should be able to select the disk and choose "Create VHD" then you can import that to VirtualBox. Or my preference would be to allocate a new VMDK that's slightly larger than the physical drive on your CentOS VM then use dd to clone the drive in there over to the new VMDK device. Then you can remove ...


0

From what you write it seems that you have an MX record for books.com but you are trying to send emails to info@mail.books.com. That should be info@books.com or you should have an MX for mail.books.com.


1

The problem seems to be that the VM network is not reachable from outside the Windows 8.1 machine. You can see that it works when you ssh to localhost:2222 and that may be caused because of the network configuration (probably is configured as NAT, the default) When using VirtualBox you should configure the network of the VM to be bridged and that should do ...


3

You may be overthinking this. The manual assignment of cores here could actually result in lower performance. In the VMware world, we don't do this unless there are very specific requirements, but for the workload and applications you've described, it's not necessary. Let KVM schedule things and be done. If in doubt, get more cores and sockets. But CPU ...


0

Option 1 should't slow down in most cases but the OS and the programs could go trigger-happy with their workloads. It might get piled up. I think option 2 is better if your neighbor doesn't mind the ~tiny~ slowdown.


0

to see the full set of what the host can offer, run virsh capabilities. The <cpus num...> field will hold the number, followed by the listing of cores/sockets/threads etc.


2

Use virsh nodeinfo. The output will be something like: CPU model x86_64 CPU (s) 8 CPU frequency 2895 Mhz CPU socket(s) 2 Core(s) per socket 2 Threads per core: 2 Numa cell(s) 1 Memory size: 1046528 kb Source: ...


2

Besides the basic math & concept that you still need the same IOs as non-virtualised, there is also QOS/prioritisation. Most virtualisation platforms offer at least a basic support for this, will help out a lot to prevent the misbehaving dev VM stalling your prod DB.


19

Is it ever sane to use a Virtualized solution when performing I/O heavy workloads? Yep, very sane indeed, in fact for most organisations now virtual is the default and doing things on physical boxes is the very much the exception. We have over 100k VMs of all forms and many of them are >40k IOPS with no issue at all. What are the best practices ...


10

Is it ever sane to use a Virtualized solution when performing I/O heavy workloads? Does a database server regularly pulling 1gb/second random IO count? Have one here. Or a virtual file server delivering up to 600mb/second to a HPC cluster. That one is running off 8 Velicoraptors in a Raid 10, dedicated. What are the best practices around this ...


0

OK, I found the solution. Long story short a small 100MB partition needs to be generated before the installation if you are defining partitions rather than allowing Windows to do it. This is probably a unique case as the idea behind this program is to minimize the amount of time a user must touch the system during setup, so we create a partition and copy ...


1

Ever considered using technology applicable for the job? I can not imagine a backup that requires the VM to be turned off and then is done via a hodge podge script, instead of having a backup software that integrated with the hypervisor. Plus, this is not nevessarily "either or". I use Hyper-V and we do machine backups from the host twice per day - BUT: ...


-2

It is better to backup the virtual machines themselves. The host should be disposable. If you ever have to rebuild the hardware, a machine backup can be problematic. Also, if you need to restore an individual VM then your only option is to restore the whole thing. There are many products out there that support backing up running virtual machines.


0

I am not familiar with Windows qemu, on linux , the command line should be qemu-img convert -O raw ${the_virtual_disk_image} /dev/${the_ssd} SO, you may have a try like qemu-img convert -p -O raw "D:\Virtual Machines\LinuxMint\LinuxMint-System.vdi" \\.\PHYSICALDRIVE5



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