New answers tagged

0

You need, at least, 104 ips available on your subnet. What is most close to it is 128, from where you already have to remove 2 as they are going to be used for network address and broadcast address. Having this in mind, and knowing that having a 24 bits prefix network address means having (255-2) available ips, you could only get one bit more for subnets. ...


0

I'm thinking that you probably don't need to define an explicit route for the 10.36.8.0/24 network because it's a directly connected network. Try removing that routing statement and then look at the routing table and see if there's a route for 10.36.8.0 that shows as directly connected or similar. I'm not familiar with HP switches, so I'm basing this on my ...


2

The answer is Yes and No. You can make the changes, BUT hosts and devices won't be able to communicate with each other until and unless the ports they're connected to are members of the same VLAN. So if hosts 1 and 2 are connected to ports 1 and 2 in VLAN 1 and you make port 1 a member of VLAN 2 then hosts 1 and 2 won't be able to communicate until you make ...


0

Problem was caused by custom kernel from server provider (OVH) without vxlan support. Switched to generic kernel and vxlan support is working.


2

Yes, DHCP requests are broadcast requests. If the host wanting a DHCP address is on a different subnet then you need to configure an IP Helper address. The IP helper address will forward the DHCP request using unicast to the DHCP server.


2

when a client requests an IP address it does not know anything about the DHCP server so it broadcasts a DHCP DISCOVER packet to all hosts on its segment, if it does not get a response - and it won't in your case - DHCP won't work, in order to avoid setting up an DHCP server in every VLAN we use 'IP HELPER' address, this is a switch configuration that detects ...


0

Use two VLANS - One for your normal network, and one for your protected one. VLAN1 = BRIDGE0 = 10.0.1.1/24 VLAN2 = BRIDGE1 = 10.0.2.1/24


0

it sounds like you have an IP address conflict, the next time it's not working before you ping it look at your arp cache arp-a and note down the MAC address, now ping the RMS server and look in the arp cache again


0

Before we start you need to ensure you can ping your Ubiquity router's LAN interface, I am assuming it is 192.168.1.1. You will need to ensure the interface from your switch to your router is in VLAN 1 and then add an IP address to your Vlan 1 interface by entering the following command. The IP address must be in the same subnet (192.168.1.X/24) en conf t ...


0

You need to add interfaces to the gateway/router for the 10.0.100.x, 10.0.200.x. and 10.0.300.x networks. Otherwise you can't route from those networks to a different (in this case a 192.168.x.x) network.


0

Your IP address on your router and the ISPs router are the same. They shouldn't be. The addressing on the Ubiquity should match addressing for your Vlans IE 10.0.100.1, 10.0.200.1, 10.0.300.1 and should match the VLAN ID for each one of the corresponding VLANs. Your DHCP for each VLAN should be as follows VLAN100 10.0.100.0/24 Gateway 10.0.100.1 DNS ...


0

It depends on where your imaging server is located. Is it located in the local network (same VLAN as clients) or behind the router? I suppose it's located in the same network/VLAN as the clients, so by setting its mask to /24, the only thing that will change is that it will no longer be able to reach anything outside of the initial /28 because it would have ...


-1

It seems the vlan filter shifts the packet contents.... http://www.christian-rossow.de/articles/tcpdump_filter_mixed_tagged_and_untagged_VLAN_traffic.php


3

For this to work you will need to set the VLAN tag in the NIC's BIOS, if there is any. Another solution would be to run the imaging network untagged into the systems, making PXE boot possible if the card can't boot from a tagged network. Then configure the operating system driver to use a tag for the production network.



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