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1

Snapshotting a VM means that the original VMDKs are fixed, all changes will go to a diff file. So you would have to copy the VMDK files themselves. (As far as I know there are two: A vmdk file describing the virtual disk and a "flat" file containing the data.) However, I would consider this a pretty crude and unprofessional way to do backups of VMs. It ...


3

It will be pretty useless and you won't be able to transport a snapshot to another system for use. They depend entirely on the original VMDK's. Again, this isn't the purpose of VMware snapshots. They're really meant to be temporary and have major implications for storage performance and disk space.


4

This particular alert can be controlled in the Advanced Settings under the Configuration tab for the host in question. Once there, go to the UserVars category and scroll down to UserVars.SuppressShellWarning. Change the value from 0 to 1, and you will no longer be warned that the host in question is allowing SSH access.


1

Rsyncing a single file is not a backup solution, what do you do when something happened to the vm and files were deleted, but you only noticed this after your rsync has run again? You will have overwritten the good 'backup' of your files with the bad image now. If you want backup you need to keep the old versions somewhere, or the diff's. Rsync will only ...


3

I used to do just this a few years back. (edit: with VMWare running on CentOS hosts, not ESXi admittedly) Every night I had a script that would suspend a VM, rsync the files from disk to the backup server and then start the VMs again. It worked quite well except... Rsync doesn't work very well with a 2GB file. Its not because rsync isn't brilliant, it ...


22

Because the transfer speeds out of the ESXi console are purposefully limited. Because this isn't scalable in any way. Because you'd have to drop a statically-compiled rsync binary onto the ESXi host. Because the VMs, the VMDKs, their ramdisk files and other components can change enough to make rsync a losing proposition... do you really want to re-sync a ...


3

Speaking as someone who was once forced to put a server (not a DC, fortunately) in an unairconditioned closet with the door tied open, a hole in the ceiling through which one could see sky, and foot traffic walking by, I'm curious as to how insecure the location is. If they can hoist your server onto a shoulder and walk out in the middle of the day, there's ...


2

I would tend to agree with Shane, this is exactly why RODC exists. What is managements reasoning to prohibit the usage of a RODC? It's just such a bad idea to put the brains of your organization in an insecure location. As for BitLocker, its a good idea, but it doesn't look like its supported. I would suggest using TrueCrypt FDE (Full Disk Encryption) ...


7

This is pretty much exactly what the RODC was designed for - situations where the server might be physically compromised. Gaining physical access to an RODC will give an attacker a good bit of insight into your domain and its structure, as well as password hashes of users that have explicitly been set to have their password replicated to the RODC. However, ...


3

There's no granular way to separate out these permissions - if a user has the rights to open the console of a running VM, they also have the rights to send keystrokes and mouse movements to it. View-only to the console's screen might not be that useful anyway, as most OSes will go to a black screen after a while, requiring a keystroke to put anything on the ...


1

You might get host information within your VM if you set tools.guestlib.enableHostInfo=TRUE in the advanced settings of your VMs. You might also have to set Misc.GuestLibAllowHostInfo=TRUE in the advanced settings of your hosts but I'm not sure about that. I don't know if this works for Linux guests, too, as VMware talks explicitly about Windows: ...



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