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65

I suggest that you make the adjustments they have requested. Then benchmark the performance to show them that it made no difference. You could even go so far to benchmark it with LESS memory and vCPU to make your point. Also, "We're paying you to support the software with actual solutions, not guesswork."


45

Providing you are confident you are within the given system specs they document. Then any claim they are making in regards to requiring more RAM or CPU they should be able to back up. As the experts in their system I hold people to account on this. Ask them specifics. What information provided on the system indicates more RAM is needed and how did you ...


22

Because the transfer speeds out of the ESXi console are purposefully limited. Because this isn't scalable in any way. Because you'd have to drop a statically-compiled rsync binary onto the ESXi host. Because the VMs, the VMDKs, their ramdisk files and other components can change enough to make rsync a losing proposition... do you really want to re-sync a ...


16

The big thing is to be able to prove that you are using best practices for your system allocation, notably RAM and CPU reservations for your SQL server. All this being said the easiest thing is to make the adjustments requested, at least temporarily. If nothing else it tends to get vendors over feet dragging. I can't count the number of times I've needed ...


14

That hundred gig file is a sparse file - there's nothing in it, the filesystem simply knows that's the intended size. You can see the real size in the vSphere client: ..despite the apparent size when you're looking at the raw files.. The problem you're having is that you're removing that file from the VMFS filesystem. Wherever it's going and however ...


10

For this specific situation (where you have VMware and application developers or a third party who does not understand resource allocation), I use a week's worth of metrics obtained from vCenter Operations Manager (vCops - download a demo if needed) to pinpoint the real constraints, bottlenecks and sizing requirements of the application's VM(s). Sometimes, ...


8

I used to work in support - and part of what you're asking sounds highly rational (and probably is): but there are a few questions to ask yourself prior to just doing the "performance enhancement" they're requesting are you running at least at the vendor's stated minimum system requirements already? if you're at least at minimum sysreqs, are you already at ...


8

Either ask to escalate the ticket or ask for a different rep. Depending on which vendor it is escalation may help if you say that you feel that the current level of support doesn't adequately address the issue. If they will not escalate then asking for a different rep may help because that requires much less "justification" since all it needs is to not be ...


7

This is because thin-provisioned files in ESXi are sparse files. The method you're using to move them around won't preserve that thin attribute. There are ways around this. Please see: Move VMware ESXi VM to new datastore - preserve thin-provisioning


7

You can do this by logging into the host that vCenter is running on directly. Log into the host directly with the standalone console Shut down the vCenter VM Make changes (including deleting the floppy drive) Boot VM Log into VM and expand the disk Profit


7

Delete any outstanding snapshots of the vCenter VM, then you should be able to resize the disk while the VM is running.


6

You can limit the IP addresses permitted through the ESXi firewall. http://pubs.vmware.com/vsphere-50/index.jsp?topic=%2Fcom.vmware.vcli.examples.doc_50%2Fcli_manage_networks.11.11.html That is really all you need to harden it. Locking your management down to specific IP addresses is very secure. Naturally follow the other best practices re passwords etc ...


5

The VSAN design guide recommends the following: Use SD, USB, or hard disk devices as the installation media whenever ESXi hosts are configured with as much as 512GB memory. Use a separate magnetic disk or solid-state disk as the installation device whenever ESXi hosts are configured with more than 512GB memory. My recommendation for your specific ...


4

I think, it was just an I/O timeout. I had such issues with Linux VMs on remote NFS datastore. NFS was just too slow, and some of our Linux VMs switched their disks into read-only mode (and therefore stopped responding). Probably, during resize your NFS datastore was overloaded and this caused issues. Do Linux VMs work fine after reboot? To avoid such ...


4

If you're receiving an error message similar to the following in your EL6 kickstart, you'll need to add zerombr to the kickstart command set. You should also have this instead: zerombr clearpart --all --initlabel From the documentation: zerombr: If zerombr is specified any invalid partition tables found on disks are initialized. This destroys ...


4

Two ways I learned were: You can look at the MAC address on the network settings on vmware for each NIC and do a ifconfig to check them against at the console. If you have six lines disconnect 5 of them this way. First edit the profile and highlight the Network Adapter 1 thru 5. Under the settings and uncheck the "connect" button. Then: cd /sys/class/net ...


4

We had this problem, too. We assumed that it had to do with the virtual PCI slots the vNICs were in. Iirc, the first three vNICs were fine but with more the order of the eth's was weird. We never really fixed this because we were able to get rid of VMs with so many vNICs soon. I don't know Ubuntu but look if there's a file named something with "persistent" ...


4

This particular alert can be controlled in the Advanced Settings under the Configuration tab for the host in question. Once there, go to the UserVars category and scroll down to UserVars.SuppressShellWarning. Change the value from 0 to 1, and you will no longer be warned that the host in question is allowing SSH access.


4

You can, but you don't really want to, because then you have one disk smaller than the rest, and you can't use passthrough if you wanted to. Most servers have an internal SD-card slot (or sometimes mirrored slots), or an internal USB port directly on the motherboard. You can install it on one of these. I have a bunch running off the SD card, and two that ...


4

I'll throw in my two cents. We've been pretty successful with this approach -- much better outcomes and less frustration on everyone's part. It requires a lot more effort than the blame-game and blindly adding resources, but it also has better chances of finding the underlying problem. When we have serious issues with our on-premise apps that are backed ...


3

Will ESXi 5.5 in standalone mode (free) support fibre channel SAN? Yes


3

It will be pretty useless and you won't be able to transport a snapshot to another system for use. They depend entirely on the original VMDK's. Again, this isn't the purpose of VMware snapshots. They're really meant to be temporary and have major implications for storage performance and disk space.


3

The real question is, who is in charge here? If you can't realistically switch to an alternative vendor, then they have the power, and all you can really do is go along with whatever they say and hope it will work out. Not a happy situation! Otherwise, I suggest you ask for another rep (as others have said), but make it clear you are not happy with the ...


3

I found a potential problem: "iso_url": "http://127.0.0.1:8000/CentOS-6.5-x86_64-minimal.iso", The CentOS "minimal" disk is customized and may do unexpected things, as it was intended and customized only to install a single set of packages. It should not be used with a kickstart installation; use the netinstall or DVD images instead.


3

I used to do just this a few years back. (edit: with VMWare running on CentOS hosts, not ESXi admittedly) Every night I had a script that would suspend a VM, rsync the files from disk to the backup server and then start the VMs again. It worked quite well except... Rsync doesn't work very well with a 2GB file. Its not because rsync isn't brilliant, it ...


2

The vSphere client you use doesn't matter. If you install the VMwareTools from the client, afaik the version will depend on the package the ESXi the VM runs on provides. Anyway, to the best of my knowledge VMwareTools don't install/upgrade/downgrade themselves. As Zoredache points out, check that there isn't any configuration management solution like puppet ...


2

But as I said the ISO is spin using CentOS 6.4 base and it should not impact the kickstart installation. You need to verify this. Try with a standard ISO. If it still gives the error, you told it to only clear sda: # Partition clearing information clearpart --all --initlabel --drives=sda Change to: clearpart --all --initlabel and try again.


2

Use the ESXi builtin firewall to close down unneeded ports and limit access to the open ones to a range of known IP addresses. This might be challenging if you do not use a fixed external IP address at home (like most people), so you may end up restricting access to the addresses of some other servers that you have on the Internet.


2

Do we need VCenter to do upgrades or manage the host? No, you don't need vCenter to do those things. If you have multiple ESXi Hosts you want to manage centrally, you can use vCenter to do this (licensing involved). If you just have one ESXi host running VMs and you need to upgrade to 5.5, you can do so by downloaded the appropriate version and copy to ...


2

The vSwitch should have no special configuration. Your port groups should contain all of the actual VLAN tags. On the switch side, is VLAN 1 actually defined anywhere? See my example from: vSwitch configuration with 12 uplinks There's nothing untagged at the vSwitch level because it makes more sense to associate port groups with a VLAN once you start ...



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