Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

Do ESXi (5.5) vSwitches themselves have their own mac address Yes. What circumstances require a vSwitch to send frames from this mac address? Beacon probing, RARP, a few things. Does this apply equally to Standard and Distributed switches Yes.


6

You can debug from the console and generate a crash dump. Ideally, you have some sort of out-of-band management of your physical ESXi host like IPMI, DRAC or ILO. If not, you should :) Otherwise, you would need to physically be in front of the system to get out of your PSOD state. In general, VMware should not PSOD. There have been some specific and ...


5

First and foremost, before to mangle with storage, you should be 100% sure that your bottleneck is really related to disk/IO configuration. It this is the case, an iSCSI share can be faster than a NFS one, but in specific scenario only (small random read/write packets). SQL servers can be one of these scenarios, so if you are sure that your problem is ...


4

I've not heard that iSCSI is better than NFS for SQL VMs, however if you do elect to create them, I would create the datastore on the ESX level, not install an iSCSI initiator on the VM. One thing you need to be careful about is thin provisioning on the Netapp. The way they do block devices is different. You can find yourself with an offline LUN if you ...


4

First things first: If you want to improve the performance of a VM you have to know where the bottleneck is. Improving storage performance doesn't help you if your environment lacks e.g. CPU performance. I don't think changing your storage protocol from NFS to iSCSI will help you much. There are dozens of other parameters that influence your storage ...


4

You'll need to use the server's out of band management interface (IPMI, iDRAC, ILO, etc.) to reboot the server.


4

is there some kind of network debug function? No - you need to iLO/DRAC/send-someone to restart the machine.


3

According to the vSphere documentation esxcli does indeed have a mount subcommand. List all volumes that have been detected as snapshots. esxcli <conn_options> storage filesystem list Run esxcli storage filesystem mount with the volume label or volume UUID. By default, the volume is mounted persistently, use --no-persist to mount ...


3

You're NATting to the wrong IP. Don't NAT to your host's management IP, NAT to your guest's IP.


2

What's the question here? You don't seem to be comparing apples-to-apples. So I'm not sure if you just want this system to run like your other systems, or if you really care about the cause of the performance difference. You could obtain another of the server model and SKU that you're familiar with. You could use the same type of disks you used in ...


2

VMware Server 2.0 is kind of old, and had little or no remote management capabilities as we see in ESXi today. It was one of VMware's evolutionary dead ends. Nevertheless this ought to be possible. What I would do is the following. Note that the VM must be powered off. Locate VMware Server's datastore. The datastore details will tell you where the files ...


2

Trying to clarify : vMotion : will move your VM to another ESXi server, leaving VM storage on its original Datastore. Storage vMotion : will move VM storage to another Datastore, leaving the VM on its original ESXi server. Edit : Using Storage vMotion advanced settings, you can specify which storage you want to move and where, and also choose to leave ...


1

Heard about Disk2Vhd? This little tool here will convert your machine (physical or virtual) to a vhd disk on the fly. https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee656415.aspx


1

I can really only see a couple of options here. They both assume that the only thing on this datastore is the VMDK that's housing the SQL Server's MDFs. No VMX files, no log files, no datastore heartbeating. The first would be to unmount the volume on the host in question. You can do it via the vSphere clients, esxcli or it's PowerCLI equivalent. I don't ...


1

Using Storage vMotion, you can relocate a VM with disk-level granularity. However, moving a VM from one host to another with a dependency on a local VMDK (on one host) won't work.


1

Verify that the ESX host's domain account isn't disabled. If that's OK, try dropping the ESXi host from the domain, deleting it's computer object in the domain and add it back. Failing that, try updating your host to 5.1 or later. Version 5.1 is working perfectly for us, I don't have a 5.0 host to check.


1

The accepted answer works for vSphere 6 as well, and it works for both local and remote SSD drives either with JBOD or RAID configuration. The additional commands not mentioned in the answer are: # esxcli storage core claimrule load # esxcli storage core claimrule run # esxcli storage core claiming reclaim -d <naa.ID> Then you can test if you were ...


1

Create a SATP rule for storage vendor named EMC, set the path policy as Round Robine and IOPS from default 1000 to 1. This will be persistence across reboots and anytime a new EMC iSCSI LUNs is presented, this rule will be picked up. For this to apply to existing EMC iSCSI LUNs, reboot the host. esxcli storage nmp satp rule add --satp="VMW_SATP_DEFAULT_AA" ...


1

Our configuration is simple, crude even, but its effective for our purposes: all vSwitches (one for each VLAN) get all NICs. Each Host has four (4) NICs. The NICs are connected in pairs to two switches (Juniper EX4300s in our case). NICs 1 and 2 go to Switch A. NICs 3 and 4 go to Switch B. All switch ports have all the VLANs for that host (or rather all ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible