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1

The accepted answer works for vSphere 6 as well, and it works for both local and remote SSD drives either with JBOD or RAID configuration. The additional commands not mentioned in the answer are: # esxcli storage core claimrule load # esxcli storage core claimrule run # esxcli storage core claiming reclaim -d <naa.ID> Then you can test if you were ...


0

Heard about Disk2Vhd? This little tool here will convert your machine (physical or virtual) to a vhd disk on the fly. https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee656415.aspx


2

VMware Server 2.0 is kind of old, and had little or no remote management capabilities as we see in ESXi today. It was one of VMware's evolutionary dead ends. Nevertheless this ought to be possible. What I would do is the following. Note that the VM must be powered off. Locate VMware Server's datastore. The datastore details will tell you where the files ...


6

You can debug from the console and generate a crash dump. Ideally, you have some sort of out-of-band management of your physical ESXi host like IPMI, DRAC or ILO. If not, you should :) Otherwise, you would need to physically be in front of the system to get out of your PSOD state. In general, VMware should not PSOD. There have been some specific and ...


4

is there some kind of network debug function? No - you need to iLO/DRAC/send-someone to restart the machine.


4

You'll need to use the server's out of band management interface (IPMI, iDRAC, ILO, etc.) to reboot the server.


0

Unfortunately, I think that nothing is wrong with your setup. You simply can not use more than 1 Gb/s for a single VM. The point here is that you don't want simply to use two (or more) NICs, you want to use them concurrently, in a RAID-0 like configuration. 802.3ad, the standard about link-level aggregation and that I think you configured on your switchs, ...


1

Create a SATP rule for storage vendor named EMC, set the path policy as Round Robine and IOPS from default 1000 to 1. This will be persistence across reboots and anytime a new EMC iSCSI LUNs is presented, this rule will be picked up. For this to apply to existing EMC iSCSI LUNs, reboot the host. esxcli storage nmp satp rule add --satp="VMW_SATP_DEFAULT_AA" ...


0

ESXi and HyperV would both allow you to utilize the spindle drives for a "D" data drive with ease - just store a 2nd virtual disk on those drives, presented to each VM. Server 2012 R2 also offers Storage Spaces, with which you could configure both SSDs and 7.2K drives with "tiering", which would allow for "hot" data to be auto-tiered to the SSDs regardless ...


0

This wouldn't be a terrible idea, assuming you get SSDs that are rated for the type of use you need them for. I'd assume that not requiring much "horsepower" means both CPU and disk I/O, so there'd be no need to splurge on SLC drives. Are you planning to buy a server from a vendor, or build one yourself? If you don't buy vendor-certified SSDs (or you build ...


0

This sound rather like an HA question. In VMware you would have to set up a cluster between two VMs and switch the service with a fail over cluster.


0

To see what optical devices are available, you can run this as root: % wodim --devices As for "reading the values and apply it on to the application" you need to be more specific. What exactly are you trying to accomplish?


0

Idea 1 A VM is meant to be quite isolated from its host, and thus the design is to make this sort of superspection difficult. But, you could do this using the guest-info functionality. You would need to script the host-side, to populate the mappings of guest-hardware topology information (PowerShell etc). and them use the vmtools to get that information ...


2

Trying to clarify : vMotion : will move your VM to another ESXi server, leaving VM storage on its original Datastore. Storage vMotion : will move VM storage to another Datastore, leaving the VM on its original ESXi server. Edit : Using Storage vMotion advanced settings, you can specify which storage you want to move and where, and also choose to leave ...


1

Using Storage vMotion, you can relocate a VM with disk-level granularity. However, moving a VM from one host to another with a dependency on a local VMDK (on one host) won't work.


0

It turns out it was the xinetd part of our configuration that was doing this. I'm going to close this question and ask another one specifically asking about that.


1

Verify that the ESX host's domain account isn't disabled. If that's OK, try dropping the ESXi host from the domain, deleting it's computer object in the domain and add it back. Failing that, try updating your host to 5.1 or later. Version 5.1 is working perfectly for us, I don't have a 5.0 host to check.


0

To have an idea of what you can reasonably expect at the top end, I would try a straight file copy (scp or whatever) from your source to destination. That will rule out any nginx configuration. If you still get 256kbps, then you can check into potential kernel variables, or the possibility that the network is throttled administratively. Nginx is not ...


1

Our configuration is simple, crude even, but its effective for our purposes: all vSwitches (one for each VLAN) get all NICs. Each Host has four (4) NICs. The NICs are connected in pairs to two switches (Juniper EX4300s in our case). NICs 1 and 2 go to Switch A. NICs 3 and 4 go to Switch B. All switch ports have all the VLANs for that host (or rather all ...


1

I can really only see a couple of options here. They both assume that the only thing on this datastore is the VMDK that's housing the SQL Server's MDFs. No VMX files, no log files, no datastore heartbeating. The first would be to unmount the volume on the host in question. You can do it via the vSphere clients, esxcli or it's PowerCLI equivalent. I don't ...


3

According to the vSphere documentation esxcli does indeed have a mount subcommand. List all volumes that have been detected as snapshots. esxcli <conn_options> storage filesystem list Run esxcli storage filesystem mount with the volume label or volume UUID. By default, the volume is mounted persistently, use --no-persist to mount ...


0

Each disk should have a unique identifier that you can see by selecting the Host and then going to Configuration > Storage. Click on the Devices View for easiest sorting. Compare that to what you have created. It should show you somewhere in the RAID interface that info. In the odd chance you can't determine it that way. Try taking one or more of the LUNs ...


0

I have had to do this exact same task with single NIC computers such as Intel NUCs and Apple Mac Minis that I have had running ESXi in a vSphere cluster. The underlying problem is that as the vmKernel ports are moved, connectivity with the vCenter server is lost, and as a result, the configuration is rolled back to a last-known good. This rollback is what ...


0

I don't believe this question has been answered, I recently found another article that discusses this issue and a work around for 5.5 users. http://blog.igics.com/2014/07/heads-up-vmware-sioc-virtual-disk-iops.html


-2

i dont know if you have already solved that but thats a bug in some part of the cisco ucs firmware. should be fixed with the newest version if u want i can send u the link


8

Do ESXi (5.5) vSwitches themselves have their own mac address Yes. What circumstances require a vSwitch to send frames from this mac address? Beacon probing, RARP, a few things. Does this apply equally to Standard and Distributed switches Yes.


0

Probably the network configuration files are not correctly set. More details about them can be found here: http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E37670_01/E41138/html/ch11s02.html


0

You should be able to determine which logical/virtual drives are which. The VMware client will display your block devices and how they're enumerated. You should know the capacities of your virtual drives. This should be enough to go on. In addition, if you have your Dell OMSA agents or PERC/MegaRAID .vibs installed (or a custom Dell ISO), the virtual ...


5

First and foremost, before to mangle with storage, you should be 100% sure that your bottleneck is really related to disk/IO configuration. It this is the case, an iSCSI share can be faster than a NFS one, but in specific scenario only (small random read/write packets). SQL servers can be one of these scenarios, so if you are sure that your problem is ...


4

First things first: If you want to improve the performance of a VM you have to know where the bottleneck is. Improving storage performance doesn't help you if your environment lacks e.g. CPU performance. I don't think changing your storage protocol from NFS to iSCSI will help you much. There are dozens of other parameters that influence your storage ...


4

I've not heard that iSCSI is better than NFS for SQL VMs, however if you do elect to create them, I would create the datastore on the ESX level, not install an iSCSI initiator on the VM. One thing you need to be careful about is thin provisioning on the Netapp. The way they do block devices is different. You can find yourself with an offline LUN if you ...


0

You're users do not need to have access to ESXi. Just enable RDP in the firewall and let them do it that way. Letting them see a hypervisor just introduces complexity.


0

You'll need a VM, with connections to both vSwitches, configured to route traffic between the two networks. It can be any OS you want, so long as it can perform IP forwarding/routing duties between the two networks. Depending on your particular setup, you may want it to do other things as well (firewall or NAT for example) but without knowing more about ...


0

I believe that vDS is only a requirement if you want to use LACP link aggregation or NIC load based routing. You should still have a few other teaming methods available, including an explicit failover-only order setup, in the properties of the "normal" vSwitch (settings for failover order will be specific to each vmkernel port or VM port group on the ...


0

My 2ยข: I've encontered issues with Windows Server 2008 and Intel NICs with Allow the computer to turn off this device to save power enabled. For some reason, the card would drop link speed from 1Gb/s to 10Mbit/s and wouldn't get back to 1Gb/s until a manual reset. Disabling this option fixed this. I doubt that it would affect VM, but I'd disable it on a host ...


0

After some troubleshooting we eventually found out that the problem has occurred because of inconsistent versions of ESXi Hypervisors at the hosts. The datastore was shared between three ESXi hosts. While we made ESXi Upgrades on the two of the hosts, the third was still left with an older ESXi version, (for reasons not worth mentioning). The two hosts ...


2

This setting only take effect when the computer goes into sleep mode. When you have a physical machine that has multiple NICs, and only 1 uses WOL, then you can save power by enabling this on the non WOL nics. If you never need WOL, this can save power. On a VM this wouldn't have any real effect.



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