New answers tagged

1

I found the problem and a solution. The packet loss was caused by identical MAC-addresses on different switch ports. The virtual interface VMK0 Blade 7 had the same MAC as the hardware interface of Blade 11. So what I've done is this: I gave the VMK0 interface a new MAC address. For that I go over the iDRAC interface of the Blade Enclosure and loging ...


0

I think the flag is not related to the disk image itself, rather it is a VM property. After all, for the filesystem both files (lazy & eager zeroed) are absolutely the same; on the other hand, for the VM (and the disk management console) the two files should be treated differently.


0

So it turned out that the problem was being caused by the Windows Network Load Balancer, still not 100% sure why, but we disabling NLB everything started working.


0

The request for the website gets resolved to an IP address. The traffic is then routed to your network. Your firewall/router translates the public IP address to a private IP address (based on your ip address translation configuration). Your firewall/router then performs an ARP for the MAC address of the IP address in question. The relevant virtual ...


3

Create a new VM within your ESXi environment that runs nginx and use the proxy module to direct your traffic: server { listen 80; server_name hostname1 hostname2 hostname3 ... hostnameN; if ($http_host = hostname1) { proxy_pass http://192.168.0.1; } if ($http_host = hostname2) { proxy_pass http://192.168.0.2; } ...


0

I don't think 2GB of RAM for a Windows VM is enough, whether they're running under Windows or ESXi. With 2GB of RAM I think your users will probably complain about performance. 8GB of RAM for an RDS server will easily support 30 RDS sessions. IMO, you'll get more bang for your buck going with an RDS solution. The RDS Role will come with a self-signed ...


2

At 100% CPU on the VM, the hypervisor is going to have a devil of a time writing those snapshots in. You can see all the snapshots by going to the datastore and looking for all snapshots: cd /vmfs/volumes/ then run ls -alR | grep -I *.*delta | less This will display all snapshots in each VM. You could go into the specific VM's directory to see just ...


0

I just opened the vmdk image in Virtual Box and cloned it specifying my new name and it worked just fine for my scenario. Ofcourse it created a folder in ~/VirtualBox VMs folder which is just fine.


1

I had this same issue and could not figure out how to change the password for monitoring through the web-interface. However, I tracked down the user/password file on the nagiosxi server and changed it there and all is good. To find where the password file is located to change, go to one of the Service reporting the error, go to the configuration tab and ...


1

Despite the network config that led to the situation, this remains a legit question: what's the best way to get an ESXi host to see its iSCSI storage again without a reboot? Note: I wasn't able to actually get this to work because my entire network stack was FUBAR and I needed to reboot ESXi to get it back anyhow. I'm posting this as an answer because what ...


7

WARNING about your setup I would advise you caution using this system in this setup, if you have only one physical adapter and then only one uplink to the universe from the system. I would suggest going and purchasing an extra adapter for the system, and add that to your system - this way you can still have a backup physical connection. The ...


0

I ended up just installing from the .iso file and abandoning the OVF package. There are a few tutorials on how to do this. Some are posted here: https://www.virtuallyboring.com/vcenter-server-appliance-6-0-a-fresh-install/ http://www.virtxpert.com/installing-vmware-vcenter-server-appliance-6-0-vcsa/ http://www.vladan.fr/install-vmware-vcsa-6-0/


0

As was said in the comment ; you can edit the VMX file of your VM and point it to the base disk. BUT from what you said regarding your snapshots, they were old. So the data in the VM, once this is done, will probably be far too old to be of any use. You can however restore whatever you backed up on top of it. At least you will avoid rebuilding your ...


0

I think you are right, most likely it's the ESX firewall on the host itself, probably it's explicitly blocking the protocol since you are able to successfully connect to the port with telnet. i would start by listing the firewall rules esxcfg-firewall -s if it's only listing the DNS server configured in the client, then you should be able to allow all DNS ...


-1

You can copy vm with all settings exporting it as ovf file and then when needed restore it via vSphere or ovftool.


2

I have a Cisco UCS-C240 server that runs ESXi 5.5 U2 to run 2 VMs, an standalone host, no vcenter (so almost the same problem). I opened a ticket in VMware and after a webex the solution was: 1-Log via SSH to the host. 2-Run the following commands: ~ # localcli hardware ipmi sel clear ~ # /etc/init.d/sfcbd-watchdog restart 3-Click the Reset Sensors ...


0

I tried to edit .vmx file without success, so I ended up powering on the old server, moving the VM on it, than reverting to the snapshot and finally moving the VM back to the new server. Now the VM runs normally on the new server, and I deleted the snapshot.


3

Were the snapshots taken while the machine was powered on? If so the VM snapshot state requires the CPU features match the original state. Otherwise the feature set of the CPU would wildly change in the middle of powered-on operation, that's a huge no-no. If it's powered off, yeah that makes no sense, it shouldn't matter. NOT SUPPORTED BY VMWARE, TRY AT ...


1

Your snapshots won't be useful here. The original snapshots came from a system with a completely different architecture, so the error you're receiving is very clear in its message. AMD and Intel are not compatible in vmotion or EVC terms.


2

CPU Core power management is a function that can be owned by the system/BIOS on its own but usually it's a collaborative effort with the OS, in an Intel world this is done via Speedstep extensions, AMD have similar mechanisms. VMs each have a 'CPU mask' that the hypervisor exposes to each VM to tell it what CPU capabilities it can call on, some of these are ...


0

Resuming the problem is Solved by installing the drivers into the original VMWAre ISO Eddyraz Blog


1

There are a few things to improve here: cron will not notice changes made directly to the files in /var/spool/cron. Use crontab -e instead. There's also /etc/crontab, which might be preferred for system-wide maintenance tasks like this. (The crontabs in /etc (also /etc/cron.*) are the only ones you can edit directly. They also have a different format than ...


3

The vSphere Web Client provides several options. Maybe you don't have permissions? Or perhaps this is a browser compatibility issue?


-1

5.5 Update 3b disables SSLv3. Is it possible that your vCenter is older but you downloaded the newer ISO to install your new host? Make sure your vCenter server is updated to 3b before updating hosts or adding new 3b hosts. This is the explanation from the VMware download site: "Support for SSLv3 protocol is disabled by default Note: In your vSphere ...



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