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3

You should not need to rename your vSwitches. It is not a common practice (hence the omission from the GUI and the difficulty you're having). This is mainly because the actual Portgroup names are what matter from a VM and clarity perspective. See below.


2

This is not possible using the UI. On the CLI: Create a new Switch with a name: esxcli network vswitch standard add --vswitch-name=vSwitch Rename an existing switch: According to: http://www.cyberfella.co.uk/2012/04/11/rename-vswitch/ /etc/vmware/esc.conf /net/vswitch/child[0001]/name = “vSwitch4“


0

I'd look into doing a combination of sysprep and .OVF. You could then leverage PowerShell/PowerCLI with ovftool.exe to provide some level of deployment automation that could step the end-user/customer through provisioning a new volume and/or using a current one, deploying the .OVF, etc.


3

Your network card uses the Intel igb driver. Under VMware and Linux, that device/driver can be troublesome. I'd try the following: Your ESXi build number is 1331820 and includes version 4.2.16.8 of the igb NIC driver. The current ESXi build has version 5.0.5.1.1 of the igb driver. An update of ESXi may be appropriate. The defaults on the igb driver don't ...


2

you need to edit the .vmx file to add the following line: keyboard.typematicMinDelay = "2000000" it takes out the "bounce". With my version of vmware, I have to make this change when the VM is down. I understand that it can be made from an edit window, but I have not been able to find that place.


0

If you install the HP Offline Bundle or used the HP Custom build of vSphere, it will include the the CLI version tools of the HPACUCLI. Not sure which version of vSphere you have, but here is the user guide for vSphere 5.1. If you need to download the Offline Bundle (or the HP Build Version of vSphere) you can pull that down directly from HP.


3

The VMware article you referenced recommends using the Windows Time (w32time) service configured to sync with NTP rather than the domain hierarchy. (Admittedly, VMware has vacillated a bit on this over the years, but this is the current recommended best practice.) This isn't a "hack"-- it's just a non-default configuration of the w32time service. Your ...


1

This is tied to your backup solution. VMware details the process here. It's harmless. All you need to do is select the "Consolidate" option from the VM's snapshot menu.


0

What I did is the following: Use with caution and do not copy commands blindly. Your actual file names, numbers, locations, etc. might vary. You should have backups of your data! While the virtual machine is still running: /vmfs/volumes/XXXXXXXXX/myvm # mkdir consolidate /vmfs/volumes/XXXXXXXXX/myvm # vmkfstools -e myvm-000254.vmdk Disk chain is ...


0

This behavior is determined by your settings for the destination disk. If the destination disk is a thin-provisioned disk, no. If the destination disk is a thick-provisioned disk, yes. General If you try to convert a source physical or virtual machine to a managed destination by using thick provisioned disks with large empty spaces on them, the ...


0

The issue you are having is due to a RAID controller that isn't on VMware's Hardware Compatibility List. I've had the same issues before. VMware is very picky. http://www.vmware.com/resources/compatibility/search.php Good luck. ~ M


1

You can create an OVF template from within the vSphere client. Sounds to me like this would be the way to go for you.


1

I don't think you can. This would be a rather serious security risk if you could just copy files from the VM into the host. What's possible is mounting the VMDK on the ESX host, and then copy the files out from there. You might want to have a look at the VDDK (Virtual Disk Development Kit), as I think this is able to "mount" VMDK's. There are also ...


3

No, you don't need to do that. CBT is based on incrementing a generation counter. If you do the first backup with the new software then it will have nothing to compare to, that means it will create a full backup and increment the counter. And the second and subsequent backups with the new software will create a correct delta backup of changed blocks.


1

This depends on your specifications (which you didn't provide in your question for some reason) You'll need an Intel 5100, 5300 or 5400-series CPU to be able to run ESXi 5.1 or greater. The key is enabling Intel VT extensions. You'll also want 4GB or more of RAM. The storage controller is likely supported, but again, details matter. Try it for yourself.


2

There's an entire compatibility guide on VMware's site: http://www.vmware.com/resources/compatibility/search.php If your x3400 is the m2 or m3 it's compatible up to 5.1 u2 as shown on that site.


0

If you can't do what you need with vlan tags on the bridges then maybe http://openvswitch.org/ although it seems a little overkill


4

The quick fix for this if you can't update your ESXi host is to change the NIC adapter from e1000 (or e1000e) to the vmxnet3 driver. The default for Windows guests is the latter, but causes problems under load.


8

Yes, you should update. That is a bug which is fixed in VMware ESXi 5.5 Update 1. PR 1073615: ESXi host experiences a purple diagnostic screen with errors for E1000PollRxRing and E1000DevRx when the rxRing buffer fills up and the max Rx ring is set to more than 2. The next Rx packet received that is handled by the second ring is NULL, causing a ...


1

The top line of the stack trace indicates tat the fault occurs in E1000 driver. AFAIK that is the driver for Intel network cards. I would start troubleshooting by changing the network adapter.


3

You are receiving latency errors because the array is degraded due to a failed disk. All you need to do at this point is obtain a replacement disk and insert it into drive slot #1. That is all. This can be done with the server on. No initialization, no formatting. You don't need to back up your VMs. Just replace the disk as soon as possible.


0

You might want to consider running a firmware upgrade dvd on the server as well. That controller firmware is ancient! I would urge you to download the firmware dvd, once you get the raid-5 array back in shape. There's considerable fixes and improvements in the later versions of the controller firmware. Download it from here: ...


1

Create the VM to your liking, then export it as an .ovf or .ova package. This is under the File -> Export -> Export OVF template option in the vSphere client. In this case, an .ova file would be a compressed image of the VM that you could copy/send to your client.


6

This could be a VMware issue or a locking problem on the virtual disk. Can you capture the full error message? Do other virtual machines power on without problems? Despite that, it appears you have a physical storage issue, too. Here's what the HP Smart Array P410 configuration output on a DL180 G6 looks like: physicaldrive 1I:1:1 (port 1I:box 1:bay ...


2

Would I be right in assuming that all I would have to do is download the .vmsn file and send it, or is there more to it? No, you would not. A snapshot is a delta file - it contains only the changes made to the disk, relative to the previous snapshot or the base disk. So to send a snapshotted VM, at a minimum, you need to transfer all the vmsn files, ...


0

http://techhead.co/running-vmware-vsphere-client-on-windows-7/ The above instructions worked for me [I will copy them here in case the article gets deleted]. Step 1. Get this DLL called system.dll *Note: This DLL is usually found in the %SystemRoot%Microsoft.NETFrameworkv2.0.50727 directory of a non Windows 7 PC with .NET v3.5 SP1 installed. ...


1

If you're lucky, your predecessor might have installed a proper HP image of the esxi server on the box, in which case you should be able to access the HP System Management Homepage remotely: https:// ipofyourserver :2381 This should be able to tell you a little bit more about the general health of the server (which also includes the arrays). If not, you ...


1

I may be wrong but I think you have two problems here. Yes you appear to have a physical disk issue, if you can avoid the downtime then boot up off the HP SPP/ACU image and go into ACU, run the diagnostics and replace parts as needed. The first error however suggests the datastore is IP-based, i.e. NFS or iSCSI, rather than a local SAS/SATA disk such as ...


4

You may want to look at purpose-built VMware backup tools. You will be very disappointed if you treat an ESXi host like a Linux/Unix server. Use the VMware backup commands from a separate station, and you'll be left with a nice configuration tarball. I would find another approach for the actual VM backups. Edit: Host-based example vim-cmd ...


0

Instead of using the automatic install, I've reinstalled every modules of Horizon separately (it offers more options) and it works ! Problem solved.


2

This is good as-is. You won't need a special VLAN for vSphere replication. For small installations I often go with 4-pNIC solutions. Below is a 2 x vSwitch setup with VM traffic on vSwitch0 and storage on vSwitch1. Public, management, private and vMotion networks are on their respective VLANs, trunked from the vSwitch uplinks. The vSwitch teaming is set to ...


1

You should use the name of the storage pool, not the path to it. You can get your storage pool names with virsh pool-list. You should have one named default.


1

That's what MBR logical partitions are for. Also, you should probably be using LVM if you need this level of flexibility.


0

I had a "freeze" once and it was because I had run out of space due to a forgotten snapshot.


-1

Try using visualesxtop, you might be able to use it as a batch source. https://labs.vmware.com/flings/visualesxtop


2

This is the LACP process for VMware vSphere Distributed Switches. It is not the cause of your network woes.



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