Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

All of those, and probably more. You don't mention storage IO performance, for example, and that's usually important. You need to measure performance of your workload(s) if you can, and you absolutely need to be measuring system performance metrics, so that when the former takes a hit, you can figure out the cause, which might be a bottleneck, which you ...


4

This is correct... kinda. Use lsscsi. The SCSI device nodes correspond to the controller/target/device naming you see in VMware. Extreme example: root@vdp1:~/#: lsscsi [0:0:0:0] disk VMware Virtual disk 1.0 /dev/sda [0:0:1:0] disk VMware Virtual disk 1.0 /dev/sdb [0:0:4:0] disk VMware Virtual disk 1.0 /dev/sdj ...


4

This particular alert can be controlled in the Advanced Settings under the Configuration tab for the host in question. Once there, go to the UserVars category and scroll down to UserVars.SuppressShellWarning. Change the value from 0 to 1, and you will no longer be warned that the host in question is allowing SSH access.


2

Do we need VCenter to do upgrades or manage the host? No, you don't need vCenter to do those things. If you have multiple ESXi Hosts you want to manage centrally, you can use vCenter to do this (licensing involved). If you just have one ESXi host running VMs and you need to upgrade to 5.5, you can do so by downloaded the appropriate version and copy to ...


1

It looks like VMware wants to make vCops your main monitoring solution. In other words, they make it easy to push data into vCops but hard to get data out of it because they don't want you to feed vCops data into another monitoring solution. At least that's how it feels like. However, I've found a this thread where someone says to have a look at ...


1

Thank you for all your posts.... The problem was the USB Devices.... as soon as I removed them it worked flawlessly... again.. as a side not I like to add that it will not harm if you put your VSS on manual if its on automatic.... that should do the trick!.....


1

I think you are trying to solve your problem with the wrong tools. VMware templates are very similar to traditional operating system images. They exist to really do two things: 1) Provide a consistent known-good base that all of your servers start with and 2) reduce the repetition of administrative tasks required to go from installation media to that ...


0

One option might be to create a second disk and junction C:\Program Files\VMware to D:\VMware\x64 and C:\Program Files (x86)\VMware to D:\VMware\x86, using mklink (Vista/2008+). You'll need to shut down all the apps/services that are using those folders first, then copy the contents of the VMware folders to the new D:, then make the junctions, then start ...


7

Delete any outstanding snapshots of the vCenter VM, then you should be able to resize the disk while the VM is running.


7

You can do this by logging into the host that vCenter is running on directly. Log into the host directly with the standalone console Shut down the vCenter VM Make changes (including deleting the floppy drive) Boot VM Log into VM and expand the disk Profit


0

sigh go to C:\ProgramData\VMware\VMware VirtualCenter, then open the file vcdb.properties, edit it, save it, restart the services.



Top 50 recent answers are included