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14

Method 1: Using VMWare Converter: Turn off the virtual machine; Start the VMWare Converter application; Open the wizard; Select 'standalone virtual machine' as the source and destination system; Choose 'Select volumes and resize to save or add space'; Enter a new size and voilá, you're done! Some say that the expand process is slow and that VMWare ...


7

If you have qemu-img, you should be able to do all of this from a command line dealing just with image files. qemu-img convert source.vmdk -O raw /target/drive/ That will write out whatever raw format the vmdk was out to a physical drive. I have not been able to test this on my own, but I think that will work :)


7

See this article and this one, seems like what you're looking for. here's the process: Taking a snapshot of the source VM using vmware-cmd. Create a new VM and delete all vmdks in it Copy the vmdk files from your snapshot into your new using vmkfstools. Fix your configurations files accordinately. Hope this helps.


7

That's pretty much it in 4.x. vSphere 5.0 allows for pass-thru RDMs to be larger (about 60 TB), but still has the 2 TB limit in place for VMDKs and non-pass-thru RDMs. (reference). Pass-thru (physical) RDMs and non-pass-thru (virtual) RDMs are distinguished by what degree the SCSI commands are virtualized by vSphere. Pass-thru RDMs are sent all SCSI ...


6

I'm hoping there's a better answer than this, but I've read repeated accounts of better success in converting large vmdks by breaking them down into 2gb drives (with VMWare Converter) prior to conversion.


5

VMDK's can be easily grown but not shrunk. Its best to start off smaller and grow as needed for storage management reasons. With VSphere 4 they have thin provisioning now so you can tell the server its 100 GB but on the backend it only provisions how much its really using. http://www.vmware.com/products/vsphere/mid-size-and-enterprise-business/features.html ...


5

Okay, there are several posters here saying that you need to know more before you attempt this... I totally disagree. It's actually really straightforward to stick a VM on a drive and boot it up at a client. I've done this with Windows Hyper V VMs. Lots of companies do this. I personally don't even bother going through the 'export/import' procedure - I ...


4

It's certainly possible to ship or send a virtual disk or a whole machine folder. I've done it with VDMK disks, merely copy it to a USB and move it, then import to a datastore. As for would SysAdmins/CTO's allow it? Well, it would depend on the company, not asking us, and I imagine Licensing would get a bit interesting. Would you be happy if someoneone gave ...


4

I'd take a look at VMware Converter. It can import a Hyper-V machine the same way it imports physical servers. I'm not sure there's a way to import directly from the vhd. I've used Converter quite a bit, and it's pretty simple/quick process.


4

While having two different .vmdk's on different disks acting as two LVM extents isn't perhaps the perfect way of doing this I wouldn't worry about it one bit. Certainly it'll work just fine, I don't believe fragmentation will be significantly more than if it were one disk.


4

The VMDK file is the actual virtual disk, an ovf file is just a settings file (plain text), that VMWare products (like ESXi Server) and other virtualization software (like Virtualbox) can use when importing the VM. You may have an existing settings file (like a .vmx) which you can convert into ovf format using VMware's tool 'ovftool': ...


4

A bit late, but for reference I have successfully: Attach clonezilla to the virtual machine Boot the virtual machine with clonezilla disk Save an image of the disk to an external USB drive (also attached to the virtual machine) Restore the image to a physical disk using clonezilla


4

The downside is the danger of actually running out of physical disk space and crashing all your VM's. Setting up really big "growable" virtual disks is a good way to optimize the use of your diskspace if you keep on top of the physical space available, and always make sure there is enough. However, if you don't it becomes a single point of failure that ...


4

There are now several tools available to achieve this task. Some of theme have some more functions like converting a running PC to a image and converting to other formats. One neat little tool is StarWind V2V Converter: Another one is Vmdk2Vhd from vmToolkit but I have no experience with this one. If you want to go for the big solution with more functions ...


3

You can always create a new virtual disk, mount both on your guest, copy the files over, mount the new smaller disk in place of the old larger disk. Once you are happy everything is right, delete the old larger disk.


3

The lowest tier out there for vmware hosting is vCloud Express. A big jump in features but not price would be vCloud Datacenter. Links go to list of providers. Regarding "highly overpriced:" You get what you pay for. Higher price generally means higher SLA, redundancy, performance, features, etc.


3

Seems like it is possible to import VMDK images into VirtualBox, which can run without VT albeit a little slower.


3

The feature you are asking for is called "snapshots in a process tree" in VMWare terms and "snapshot branching" everywhere else and is a feature of the VMWare Workstation product line: Note that vSphere / ESX(i) products do not have this feature. Technically, there is support for linked clones in vCenter for use with the VMWare View VDI solution. ...


3

A bug related to this was fixed in qemu version 1.2.0. Ubuntu 12.04 has an older qemu version, but if you install qemu-img from source code user@ubuntu:/tmp$ sudo apt-get install libglib2.0-dev user@ubuntu:/tmp$ wget http://wiki.qemu.org/download/qemu-1.2.0.tar.bz2 user@ubuntu:/tmp$ tar xfj qemu-1.2.0.tar.bz2 user@ubuntu:/tmp$ cd qemu-1.2.0 ...


3

Best practices are to separate the pagefile, databases, and logs onto separate spindles. This means putting three separate VMDKs on three separate LUNs. For 100 users, you might not need to do this. That's not a ton, but you should still be using perfmon (or similar) to profile your server's storage/RAM requirements. If you are, you'll know how many IOPS you ...


3

If you used the Microsoft spreadsheet to calculate your luns, I would match that. If the spreadsheet calls for 4 luns or something like that, I would create a vmdk for each lun and would probably put each vmdk in their own lun. This would largely depend upon what kind of disk system / san you are running and a host of other factors.


3

Looks like physically copying thin-provisioned disks is a bad idea. VMFS does strange things with thin-provisioned disks, things that cp or mv can't cope with. Corruption ensues. Don't do it. vmkfstools handles them much better (and safer).


2

Mount the VMDK using VMware's Disk Mount utility, then copy the file you want, then unmount it. See this page: http://www.vladan.fr/mounting-your-vmdk-disks-directly-to-your-windows-box-how-to/


2

Don't forget network attached storage type protocols (eg. NFS, CIFS). That is, if your SAN/NAS supports serves them up. Obviously a VM providing either of those would kinda defeat the purpose. Linux guests can use multiple VMDKs for an LVM, which is not exactly spanning and not exactly RAID.


2

For 100 users, my VMWare-based Exchange systems look like this... [VMDK] - 72GB thin-provisioned for operating system [VMDK] - 40GB thin-provisioned for Exchange Logs [VMDK] - 200GB+ thin or thick-provisioned for Exchange Database Don't get carried away with trying to outsmart your hypervisor's scheduler. I highly doubt that your setup would be much of a ...


2

You can't import a vmdk directly. You have to make a new virtual machine and attach the vmdk as a hard drive.


2

If you add another NIC to the VM and create another VMkernel port and put them on a new IP range and making sure they VM and host are on the same vSwitch. Then from the VM connect to the EXSi on the new IP then the transfer will say within the ESXi host and not leave the out via your NIC. You could also create a new vSwitch which is not connected to a ...


2

http://www.vmdkhosting.com offers uploading of VMDK/VMware images, or shipment of USB drive(s), and exclusively support VMware. It appears they do not allow storage appliances though (Nexenta, FreeNAS). So if you are just uploading a normal VM they are probably your best bet.


2

If you're running any recent version of esx(i) you can do a storage vmotion and convert it from thick to thin as it goes. If you're on 4.x this is built in to the gui, if it's a previous version it either involves getting a plug-in or using powershell. You will need two datastores with the second at least large enough to store the entire vmdk plus ...


2

How is your filesystem currently laid-out on the VMDK files? Is your largest partition (/storage) the last partition on the drive? Or is it on a separate VMDK file? The right process in either of those cases would be to shut down the virtual machine. Edit the machine's configuration from your VMWare client and expand the VMDK file to the desired total size. ...



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