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6

You can debug from the console and generate a crash dump. Ideally, you have some sort of out-of-band management of your physical ESXi host like IPMI, DRAC or ILO. If not, you should :) Otherwise, you would need to physically be in front of the system to get out of your PSOD state. In general, VMware should not PSOD. There have been some specific and ...


5

SQL Server will hold on to the RAM it allocates, so since it doesn't seem to go above 6-7 GB, I would allocate 8GB for SQL and keep 2-4 GB extra for the OS in this case (SQL always does some tasks outside the memory it allocates for sqlserver.exe. It would be a good idea to put this value (8 GB) in the min memory settings for your sql server instance. This ...


5

First and foremost, before to mangle with storage, you should be 100% sure that your bottleneck is really related to disk/IO configuration. It this is the case, an iSCSI share can be faster than a NFS one, but in specific scenario only (small random read/write packets). SQL servers can be one of these scenarios, so if you are sure that your problem is ...


5

VMware tools, as installed via the vSphere client, will build against the currently-running kernel, not the latest kernel on the server. If using a support OS (like RHEL6), you should avoid this entirely and use the VMware Operating System Specific Packages (OSPs), as they're managed via your package manager and can be updated independently of your ESXi ...


4

I've not heard that iSCSI is better than NFS for SQL VMs, however if you do elect to create them, I would create the datastore on the ESX level, not install an iSCSI initiator on the VM. One thing you need to be careful about is thin provisioning on the Netapp. The way they do block devices is different. You can find yourself with an offline LUN if you ...


4

First things first: If you want to improve the performance of a VM you have to know where the bottleneck is. Improving storage performance doesn't help you if your environment lacks e.g. CPU performance. I don't think changing your storage protocol from NFS to iSCSI will help you much. There are dozens of other parameters that influence your storage ...


4

You'll need to use the server's out of band management interface (IPMI, iDRAC, ILO, etc.) to reboot the server.


4

is there some kind of network debug function? No - you need to iLO/DRAC/send-someone to restart the machine.


3

Log in as administrator@vsphere.local That will produce the desired output.


2

Trying to clarify : vMotion : will move your VM to another ESXi server, leaving VM storage on its original Datastore. Storage vMotion : will move VM storage to another Datastore, leaving the VM on its original ESXi server. Edit : Using Storage vMotion advanced settings, you can specify which storage you want to move and where, and also choose to leave ...


1

Create a SATP rule for storage vendor named EMC, set the path policy as Round Robine and IOPS from default 1000 to 1. This will be persistence across reboots and anytime a new EMC iSCSI LUNs is presented, this rule will be picked up. For this to apply to existing EMC iSCSI LUNs, reboot the host. esxcli storage nmp satp rule add --satp="VMW_SATP_DEFAULT_AA" ...


1

Using Storage vMotion, you can relocate a VM with disk-level granularity. However, moving a VM from one host to another with a dependency on a local VMDK (on one host) won't work.


1

Decided to just use Veeam ONE. Their free version offers enough data and monitoring. Seems that network monitoring is a shortfall of VMware.



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