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9

If you really need a quick way to transfer files, and both systems are Linux-based, you can try UDR. This is really a form of rsync-over-UDP (using the open-source UDT framework) and is particularly handy for moving large numbers of files or transferring over high-bandwidth or high-latency links. In addition, encryption is disabled by default, so the ...


6

You can debug from the console and generate a crash dump. Ideally, you have some sort of out-of-band management of your physical ESXi host like IPMI, DRAC or ILO. If not, you should :) Otherwise, you would need to physically be in front of the system to get out of your PSOD state. In general, VMware should not PSOD. There have been some specific and ...


5

ESXi doesn't support hot-removing memory or CPUs from a VM. Someone I met in the pub a couple of months ago told me that the sister of a friend of his cousin *cough* got the answer that virtually no customer demands this feature. In other words: It doesn't pay to bother implementing hot-remove. If you want ESXi to support this, go to VMware and tell them. ...


4

You'll need to use the server's out of band management interface (IPMI, iDRAC, ILO, etc.) to reboot the server.


4

is there some kind of network debug function? No - you need to iLO/DRAC/send-someone to restart the machine.


4

In my experience, no there's no extra risk in automatcially updating VMware tools. It doesn't affect anything locally and will provide the best experience for the VMs, as well as keeping them in sync with the host. vCenter Update Manager can do it as well. You can set it up to only update the tools (and hardware) for certain VMs and, if memory serves, you ...


3

If used in daemon mode without encryption, rsync can efficiently transfer large amount of small files. Give it another try using it in daemon mode.


3

You're NATting to the wrong IP. Don't NAT to your host's management IP, NAT to your guest's IP.


2

I can not say for sure in vmware, but when using kvm decreasing memory of a running virtual machine works fine. Of course up to a limit, but the software will tell you. When you decrease it the memory in the virtual machine will gradually be lowered, until it can't be lowered any further. If you set the memory to be lower than where it stopped you will need ...


1

Have you not thought of exposing the SAN LUNs directly to the new VMs - this generally works just fine and can be faster than copying the files into a VMDK - though it can 'lock' the VMs onto their initial host. But you could use this to get things going then migrate the files into a VMDK at your own pace - with rsync - and later cut the link to the original ...


1

I agree with GregL. But I would like to add a possible alternative: If you already package software and deploy and update it (like a third-party AV or something) automatically with a generic solution, you can get the latest VMwareTools version from here and do the same.


1

Ha! I had exactly this problem a few years ago so asked the very wonderful William Lam (well known VMWare consultant/employee/blogger) who kindly wrote me THIS script in Perl for the VMa - then someone below in the comments wrote the same thing in PowerCLI script - so there you go! As for your concerns, VMWare don't have to test a million drivers on ...


1

If the destination VMs aren't yet built, you might try using the free VMware Converter to copy the data over. In fact, even if they are built, you could clone the disks to a dummy VM then attach them to existing VM once the clone is done. In any event, the converter uses two methods to clone files from source to destination, the full details of which can ...



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