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3

ESXi should automatically pick up any existing datastores if you do a rescan on the controllers - the rescan all... button: A more detailed instruction can be found in the vmware knowledgebase


3

vCenter is still required no matter how you slice it. From their 6.0 guide, "If you are using vSphere, you must use a supported version of vSphere ESX/ESXi hosts and vCenter Server". It's a bit more work but well worth the effort in terms of management.


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As Ben has stated (and Chopper3 in the comments), you do in fact need vCenter when using View. However, when you say: It is just a management tool based on this answer. so can I still set up VDI using VMware Horizon view 6 without a vCenter server? You're only partly right. While vCenter does provide an advanced management interface to ESXi, in the ...


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You don't say which version you're running - if you're running version 5.x then you can't 'hot-migrate' but you can 'cold-migrated' (kind of, by either exporting/importing the VMs or sharing the datastores between vCenters and removing/adding the VMs), if you're running version 6.x and your vCenter's share a PSC then you can just go ahead and do it!


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In case the software inside your VMs relies on a CPU feature that the chosen EVC mode hides it will crash. A lot of software doesn't take some CPU features for granted and falls back to doing things themselves ("in software") instead of offloading tasks to specialized CPU instructions. So even if your software can run without certain CPU features you might ...


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Add a domain controller (or take a clone of one of the existing ones) Move it to your test network, fire it up. Seize all of the FSMO roles. Use ntdsutil to clean up the old DCs that it can no longer contact.


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Dang, if you had been using vSphere 6, you could have done inter-vCenter clones and be done with it. In any event, this task isn't super-hard with 5.5 either if you use the PowerCLI. The steps are as such: Take a snapshot of the VM (use PowerCLI, or either of the GUIs, doesn't matter) Clone the snapshot to a new VM using this handy little bit of ...


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If you would like to keep existing partition/disk layout, I would start by creating three partitions on the new disk. One for /, one for /boot (of atleast same size as the ones today. You can see start/end blocks with fdisk -l). I would pvcreate the third partition (sdc3) and vgextend vg0 volume group with it. Then I would pvmove the allocated extents from ...


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According to the documentation, the -Location parameter for New-VM expects an object of type Folder. If you're passing in a path string, then it's not going to work. You'd need to use Get-Folder, with either the folder ID (Get-Folder -ID Folder-group-v30070), or the name of the folder itself (Get-Folder destfolder) to store the Folder object and then pass ...


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You can use vSphere replication to replicate from one host to another. It is not only for cross-vSphere migrations. Veeam's Backup suite can do the same thing with a lot less complexity. So while the built-in vSphere replication product works, recovering from it is a bit of a pain. Veeam is very inexpensive for two hosts, so it's probably worth the ...


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Then setup a terminal server for your users to work with. What you want to do is like multiple PCs using only one hard disk, which just can't work, at least in write mode.


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What you are looking for is called the vSphere API. You can find the documentation for Version 5 of the API here.


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I talked to a friend of mine who has dealt with this type of thing before and here is what we did to get the environment to the end-state. First, I never had to use dnsmasq -y, this worked as soon as I restarted the dnsmasq service and the test VM The first thing we did was fix the dnsmasq server. In /etc/network/interfaces, you specifie the ip addr you ...



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