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-1

I have had success using http://www.veeam.com/virtual-machine-backup-solution-free.html It's a lot faster than a datastore copy and paste in the infrastructure client.


3

While there shouldn't be a difference here, my benchmarks have shown a slight (but clean nonetheless) performance increase in Windows guests when using single core multi-socket emulation (e.g. 4 vCPUs are mapped as 4 sockets, single core, single thread). No visible difference in Linux guests though. Tests were done on KVM, using Windows 2003R2 and 2008R2 ...


4

The best generic approaches are: Export the VM as an OVF file, move to a local system, then reimport the OVF to your ESXi destination. Use vSphere and perform a host/storage migration. Leverage one of Veeam's free products to handle the ad hoc move. Solutions like rsync or scp will be rate-limited and have no knowledge of the content (e.g. sparse VMDK ...


2

There's no major difference here. The main purpose of the cores/socket designation is to provide options for software that may have runtime or licensing requirements based on the number of "physical" sockets or CPU cores (cough, databases...) There's no significant performance difference between multiple cores on one socket versus a combination of multiple ...


4

Short answer: Probably none that you would notice. Long answer: Maybe. The issue that comes to my mind first and foremost is that modern CPUs operate much faster than the main memory they use. This is the primary reason why NUMA (non-uniform memory access) was invented. CPUs on the same die (ex. two cores on the same chip) would share the same NUMA node... ...


8

Not considerable enough to make an impact. The adjustments are more for licensing. For example, Windows Server is licensed per processor slot, so you'd pay more to have 1 core and 4 CPUs than to have 1 CPU and 4 cores. Same goes with other products whose costs quickly rise with more processors (looking at you, Oracle).


1

I think over Update Manager you can only update your ESX / ESXi Servers. For Updating vCenter Server you have to download the 3GB iso and install it over this way... If your vCenter Server is an Windows Server your can unzip the iso File on the Server and start autorun.exe. Here you can use "easy-Install" which contains alle the bundles you need (vCenter ...


3

No. You'd need to download the .ISO package... In this case, you'd need: VMware-VIMSetup-all-5.5.0-2105955-20140901-update02.iso Since you're on the Windows platform, you'd load the .ISO and run the installer on top of your existing installation.


0

Don't worry about it. It's just a rounding issue... 2267MHz is usually represented as 2.27GHz From dmidecode on a similar system: Version: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5520 @ 2.27GHz Voltage: 1.4 V External Clock: 133 MHz Max Speed: 4800 MHz Current Speed: 2267 MHz Or look at how a 2.8GHz CPU is represented...


0

I'd suggest just running the updates as-is. There's no harm in it. If this is a single machine, it will require downtime. Without going into this mess, think of the ESXi patches as being delivered as a full image. See: Are VMware ESXi 5 patches cumulative?


0

vCenter Operations Manager needs to be tuned for your environment and business hours. There are tunables you can set that impact its recommendations for VM sizing. The default thresholds are way too aggressive. But in general, I don't see anything wrong with the recommendations you've. I actually think 256MB of RAM is too small, depending on what you ...


0

I'm not sure if I can help you much because we're not using Dell servers. But it looks like I can at least help you with the acronym VIB: VIB stands for vSphere Installation Bundle. It's basically a software packaging format like RPM. Dell Custom ESXi distribution should contain at least one, but quite probably several, additional VIBs with drivers and ...


0

Install the Dell Custom ESXi distribution or just add the Dell .VIBs to an existing install. That will provide you with Manufacturer-specific hardware awareness. In your vCenter, add the requisite alerts for the "Host Hardware Health". That's all I monitor, since it's a bit of a catch-all for host health conditions.


2

Given that there is potentially root-level malware on the loose, grab a known-good laptop (e.g. one booted from a LiveCD) and plug it into a port on the switch. Fire up some packet capturing software. Unplug cables (optionally in small groups) until the traffic of interest stops. Identify the device(s) connected to the cable(s) in question. Note that, in ...


4

Run a packet capture. Look at the ARP request in the capture. Identify the source MAC address in the ARP request. Look for the switch port tied to that that MAC address in the MAC address table of the switch. Identify the device connected to that switch port. Inspect that device.


0

Yes it will contain the same VMid you can Change it in vmname.vmxf – Replace the existing VMId with a new id generated by uuidgen. – Replace the vmxPathName attribute.


2

There is no point to buying vSphere Standard (or any SKU) without vCenter Server or the vCenter Appliance. If you don't have a previous vSphere purchase on record, vCenter and vSphere licenses can usually be acquired in a bundle at a discount.



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