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12

Yes it is possible. You can do this with the "vmrun" command using the "nogui" option: vmrun -T ws start /export/vmware/rh5/server.vmx nogui The VM will then come up without starting the Workstation GUI and you can ssh to it. If your host os is Windows change the path to: vmrun -T ws start C:\export\vmware\rh5\server.vmx nogui


10

Yes, VMWare Workstation can run 64-bit guests on a 32-bit hosts...however it is required that your hardware can support 64-bit OS's (it doesn't have to run a 64-bit OS, it just needs to support it). Blog post talking about it Free tool to check if your CPU is capable of running 64-bit guests


8

VMWare is a very strong solution. You should look at creating a team in VMWare Workstation to bring up your mini LAN. This tends to mimic reality very well and can be reconfigured on the fly. Unless you have something very strange in mind, VMWare workstation can help you simulate just about anything a real LAN could encounter.


8

The feature was introduced to provide better support for applications (and operating systems) that treat cores differently to processors, this is generally due to licensing constraints. XP Home, for example, will not recognize a second processor but has no problem with a single multiple core CPU, likewise Windows Server 2003 Standard has a 4 processor limit ...


8

No. The name "hardware virtualization" specifically indicates that the feature is based in hardware. If the CPU does not have the instruction set, you cannot enable it otherwise. Intel's testing the market with "software enabled" upgrades but I believe it to be cores and cache, not instruction set.


8

You would only theoretically have problems if you live migrated your VMs from an AMD processor to an Intel processor (i.e. vMotion). If you shut down the VM and then start it up again on the new processor, you will be fine, provided the guest OS isn't particularly processor-dependent. (Most aren't.)


7

You experiments are doomed. Copying a VM with SQL Server in it and trying to set up replication with its former self will fail, guaranteed. There are just too many places where the machinery will get confused about who is talking to. Make a new VM for the subscriber, install OS and SQL from scratch, its a 30 min. exercise that will get you a clean state. ...


7

VMware (and I think most VM vendors) have "physical-to-virtual" conversion tools that should do the job. It's been a long time since I've tried them, but when I did I had no good luck (I'm sure that's probably not the case anymore - it's been a very long time). However, if you find they don't work for you, you can do what I usually do - attach an empty ...


7

Ok, so after much toiling I finally figured out how to do it. And again, gparted cannot be used. Firstly, you should expand the size of the disk in VMWare Workstation. Boot into a livecd and open a root terminal: We need to create a new primary partition of type LVM out of the free unused space. #fdisk /dev/sda #Command (m for help): n #Command (m for ...


7

Ah -- now it becomes clear: My machine is installed in vmware workstation. So, form all the answers, I guess maybe the jitter becomes so large is because that vmware adjust the time. I will see if I am right. Don't run ntp in a VM. The host computer doesn't guarantee CPU slices, so the VM's clock isn't accurate. As you see, ntp is trying to ...


7

I figured this out -- add to the vmx file: ethernetX.rxbw.limit = 56 ethernetX.txbw.limit = 34 where ethernetX is the adaptor to limit, i.e. ethernet0 or ethernet1 Thanks to http://www.sanbarrow.com/vmx/vmx-network-advanced.html


6

VMware Workstation and VMware Player both require the VMware application to be open and running, preventing you from logging out. The application / VM window itself can always be minimized. There are application settings to configure performance of the VM when running in background mode (i.e. not the current application focus). If you're looking for running ...


6

You could use VMware vCenter Converter(free) or Paragon Go Virtual(free), both applications will convert your existing physical machines in to virtual machines. I have only used VMware vCenter Converter with good results.


6

it depends on what the VM is running, a guest on a machine with n number of cores will perform best at n-1 cores assigned so long as the guest is capable of utilizing multiple CPUs effectively. Unfortunately the simplest way to determine this is to try it and see. I usually start with 2 and stop when I run out of performance increase. Typically 2 cores is ...


6

Shopping/product recommendations are off-topic, but I will address the technical inaccuracy in the response that you got. A VMDK is a virtual disk, which is a container that contains all of the files in your VM. It is very possible to back this up, and all enterprise products support this. The way that it works is that the filesystem is quiesced and ...


6

Actually, there is a way to shrink a VM on ESXi, although you need to shut down the VM for it. Here's how: Zero all unused space inside the VM: dd if=/dev/zero bs=1048576 of=/zero ; sync ; rm /zero Do the same with other mount points, swap partitions, etc. Shut down the VM. SSH to ESXi, and issue this command: vmkfstools -K ...


5

The UUID of the disk is in the .vmdk file. For example: # The Disk Data Base #DDB ddb.toolsVersion = "8327" ddb.adapterType = "lsilogic" ddb.geometry.sectors = "63" ddb.geometry.heads = "255" ddb.geometry.cylinders = "2610" ddb.uuid = "60 00 C2 9f e4 06 d9 4c-13 9a d8 50 77 bb 73 36" ddb.longContentID = "72d1cd8a4fb3119ca80f3870ee90c1b0" ...


5

Most Windows NT 4.0 CDs were bootable. Have you tried just booting the CD-ROM yet? If you can't boot the CD and still want to create the "floppies", grab this virtual floppy driver and use the instructions from Microsoft to create disk iamges of each of the bootable floppies. (Actually, you can find images of the Windows NT 4.0 boot disks in various places ...


5

Check out WANEM - The Wide Area Network Emulator. It's a utility available as a bootable iso or a VMware appliance. It can simulate various network characteristics (bandwidth, rtt, packet loss/reordering/corruption, jitter, etc) by setting the parameters in a simple web interface and routing your traffic through it. I used it myself to simulate/optimize ...


4

What's your budget? I mean, I can give you several really cool options but they may not fit your budget. You can easily fit that into a 1U though. UPDATE: Now that we've established a budget of $1,000 or so... Quad core processor for sure. Decent motherboard that can handle as much memory as you can afford. As much RAM as you can afford Get a couple ...


4

Go to VMware Workstation and select the virtual machine you wish to make changes to. With the virtual machine selected go to > Edit virtual machine settings (a new window will open) On this window select Network Adapter > under Network Connection select > Bridged. What Bridged does is connect the vm directly to the network


4

I would suggest starting performance monitor on the host, and then starting the guest vm computer. My guess is that you'll see the Disk Queue pegged at the top most of the time, causing the slowness. If not, post what you do see as the bottleneck. I have a similar setup. The RAM is ok, and the CPU is ok, but the high disk queue causes the guest OS to be ...


4

I highly recommend VMWare ESXi for a small deployment like this. Simply install ESXi on the server, and you can use the VSphere client to manage it easily, and you can use VMware converter (http://www.vmware.com/products/converter/) or Vizioncore vConverter to migrate you physical hosts over to it. VMWare has some really nice on-demand webcasts on their ...


4

Sounds like you're after a bit of a breakdown about what VMWare products do what. VMWare ESXi - This is the latest version of the VMWare HyperVisor. It is a dedicated operating system that installs on 'bare metal' - that is, it sits on its own on the box, and you create your VM's inside it. ESXi does come in a free version, which is really quite good, but ...


4

Which of these products is best with all features to use on server to make Virtual Machines? VMware has a pretty good information about which products are good for what function. Visit these pages. VMware Server features VMware ESXi features VMware Workstation Why Workstation VMware Player Why Player Can I create a virtual machine with ...


4

The reason RDP is great is the following: 32-bit color support. 8-, 15-, 16-, and 24-bit color are also supported. 128-bit encryption File System Redirection Printer Redirection Local Port Redirection for serial and parallel ports Improved bandwidth tuning for RDP clients depending on current connection. Summary: RDP (kind-of) gracefully degrades the ...


4

To clarify, you're saying that you have a dual-core CPU, and you've assigned 4 virtual CPUs on the VM? In this case, no; if you assign more vCPUs than you have physical execution cores, you will actually see a slight reduction in performance due to the overhead of sharing the 2 physical cores among 4 virtual cores (plus everything running on the physical ...


4

Do it for your tests. That is a really intersting question. Teorically you cannot do this, you cannot install VMWare EsXI or Hyper-V in a Virtual Machine. This is because they are hypervisor, bare metal sofware, that means, virtualization software that runs directly on the hardward without a host OS, as you can imagine it has lots of performance advantages. ...


4

We experimented a while ago (see my question from a year ago) with assigning vCPUs from physical cores vs. logical cores (threads) in quad-core CPUs with hyperthreading (8 assignable vCPUs appeared to be available). As the answers I got back then suggested -- and our experience bore out -- you should allocate the minimum number of cores you can to each ...


4

Sure is, you can make it an ISO and mount it on the system. Beware, that it will take up as much harddisk space as the drive it's a copy of, so you'll want to do this on another drive. There are far easier ways. For instance: Use "File->Import" on the Workstation to choose the harddrive as the source drive to mount.



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