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52

Have a look at reptyr, which does exactly that. The github page has all the information. reptyr - A tool for "re-ptying" programs. reptyr is a utility for taking an existing running program and attaching it to a new terminal. Started a long-running process over ssh, but have to leave and don't want to interrupt it? Just start a screen, ...


28

As you're using Linux, what about using retty inside the newly launched screen process? $ screen -S my_process $ retty $(pgrep my_process) /redraw HTH cheers,


25

You cannot do this, easily. I'd suggest making it a habit to start screen as the first thing you do after opening a console. However, for your actual problem, there's another thing you could try: after having launched your job from the terminal, background it by typing ctrl-z and then bg. After that, detach the job from it's parent shell; in bash you'd do ...


16

Use x11vnc, It will attach to a running session and let you share the desktop. If you run it as root to connect to an xdm session, you will need to do some research into Xauth as it can be a bit fiddly to set up. Another advantage of this server is that it supports alot of the advanced VNC features used by UltraVNC including large bitmap caching and ...


12

I would recommend Ultra VNC, which now supports Windows Vista and has file transfers.


12

You're absolutely right in your observation that, typically, VNC requires more bandwidth than RDP. VNC is a "bandwidth hog" because it's oriented at duplicating the pixels of the remote display. Conversely, RDP is based on drawing primitives (boxes, lines, etc) rather than sending pixel updates. Think of it like this: In VNC, the pixels on the display that ...


11

We're happily using a combination of Vine Server for OSX and JollyFastVNC for the clients. Vine Server provides for a "personal" VNC server instance on a unique port number for each logged in user. The only trick is that the user needs to be already logged into the Mac with VineServer running under their account to be able to VNC in. The solution for the ...


10

Bind your VNC server to localhost and do an SSH proxy to your server and tunnel VNC (client) over said proxy.


10

Putty does support ssh tunnels, if you expand the Connection, SSH tree, you'll see an entry for tunnels. Local tunnels produce a localhost port opening on your windows machine that remotes to the ip address and port you specify. For instance, when I'm trying to RDP to a desktop at my house, I'll generally choose a random local port, something like 7789, ...


8

If you have a reasonable fast link, X11 is the native remote technology on Linux and every other Unix-type system, as the X11 system was designed from the ground up to work over the network. These days, it's mostly used with ssh port forwarding (like ssh yourname@example.com -X), and NX, mentioned in the answer by alvosu, "merely" improves on the ...


8

Take a peek at Aqua Connect Terminal Server. It provides multi-user OSX to clients via RDP, VNC, and X11.


7

Yes you can install the video hook driver on Vista, but you have to do it manually. To improve speed, right click on the UltraVNC icon on the taskbar and select properties. Then tick the following boxes: Poll Full Screen Poll Foreground Window Poll Window Under Cursor System HookDll If you are using the video hook driver, check if the Video Hook ...


7

I can't find any good reason not to use built-in RDP server, as on Windows it beats VNC hands down. 3 sessions ought to be enough. http://www.uvnc.com/ if you must.


7

None. Use Windows's builtin Remote Desktop technology instead. It comes with both Windows Server and Windows 7, it's heavily optimized for Windows and in my experience, much nicer to use compared to VNC.


6

You can stream your desktop using vlc in conjunction with the screen:// input access module (gets screenshots from the primary screen) as a (multicast) streaming server and then use vlc again on the desktops as a client. There is a fair number of walkthroughs on the net for this, here is an example of a rather decent one: ...


6

There are expensive projectors that have a NIC built-in, and can do exactly what you're talking about natively. Alternatively there are hardware bridges for such a thing, search "vga over IP" or "hdmi over IP" and you should find them. FWIW I've had good experiences with StarTech


6

This blog post "Flawless Screen Recording for Ubuntu, Headless" explains how to use headless VNC in order to record screen sessions. It turns out there is a very good recorder for VNC, vnc2swf. The only problem here is that Ubuntu’s built in VNC server (Remote Desktop) doesn’t work headless, and I’d never pursued alternatives since freenx is so ...


6

If you want a built-in solution Windows Remote Assistance may be what you want. It allows you to remotely control a machine or RDP session while the user still is connected. Past that, there are lots of third part remote control applications.


5

If you're talking about straight out of the box VNC, it does not provide any encryption (UltraVNC does however, and RealVNC does to, for the commercial package). FreeNX is used over ssh so, it's secure by default I'd say, but you can also tunnel VNC through ssh.


5

start -> run -> cmd -> netstat -b


5

Verveguy, I just set this up using Vine Server, works well. Since I'm using this computer solely for terminal purposes, I created a script that automatically does a fast user switch once you log in. #!/bin/bash /System/Library/CoreServices/Menu\ Extras/User.menu/Contents/Resources/CGSession -suspend I put that in a /opt/fastswitch then in Terminal did, ...


5

As of OS X Lion this is supported by the built-in Screen Sharing, if you have set up multiple accounts: Per-user screen sharing You can remotely log in to a Mac with any user account on that computer and control it, without interrupting someone else who might be using the computer under a different login.


5

Take a look at ScreenRecycler, it's exactly what you want. Can't vouch for performance since I haven't used it directly myself. As a new user, can't post the URL, but it's what you'd expect... -Tom


5

boot your Mac from the Install DVD open Screen Sharing and connect to the IP of your Mac (it's IP will supplied by DHCP, you might have to look it up on your router/DHCP server — or use "arp -a" to locate it) for VNC login and password, leave the username blank, but type in the first 8 digits of your Mac's hardware serial number I have tested this with ...


5

The problem isn't in your choice of VNC software, it's somewhere else -- I've never seen VNC with a latency like that over a local network. I'm at a loss to even make suggestions as to what to check, apart from really general things like "does your LAN suck?".


5

Add :port to the hostname (you'll notice the Display option box greys out when you do this), and Chicken of the VNC will use your specified port number rather than attempting to determine one based on the Display number.


5

The VNC reflector is designed to reduce CPU load on the VNC server or network traffic across a specific link (or both). The reflector acts like a single client to the VNC server, but it has enough knowledge of the protocol to act like a VNC server itself for multiple clients. Use cases: VNC server is too slow to handle lots of VNC clients: run a VNC ...


5

Have you considered using Remote Desktop instead of VNC?



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