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8

By default redis listens on 127.0.0.1 have you edited your redis.conf to include the line bind your.private.ip.address ?


7

The same way you would reset the passwords for a physical Windows machine. My preference is Offline NT Password and Registry Editor. It will let you change or reset any of the local passwords on the system.


5

Given your updated question you are presumably using the official Amazon Linux AMIs configured to run as NAT instances ('ami-vpc-nat') and setup according to NAT Instances? This is obviously not required, but provides a sound baseline to achieve the desired stability of course. Regarding your question: Fortunately AWS has recently announced Elastic Network ...


5

It's hard to answer which is better for you, ELB or rolling your own solution. Like a number of Amazon's services ELB is simply a managed service and it takes the hassle out of having to setup and maintain your own ELB. This can be very appealing, particurally if you don't have the time or resources to do it all yourself. Behind the scene's Amazon's ELB is ...


4

Using AWS's VPC gateway would typically require a hardware router such as a Cisco or Juniper. You could take the virtualized route by going with Mikrotik or Vyatta at your site. To connect your PC to the VPC, I'd recommend installing OpenVPN on your AWS instance. You can set-up an SSL VPN to your PC. Setting up the SSL VPN is not difficult. There are ...


4

It strongly depends on the virtualization platform you want to use. With VMWare, you can run a x64 guest on a x86 operating system, provided you have a x64 CPU and it supports Intel VT extensions (or their AMD equivalent). There's no way (I know of) you can run a x64 system, be it guest or host, if you don't have an actual x64 CPU.


4

The physical interface is at least gigabit, and known to be 10 gigabit on Amazon's "HPC" instance types. However, that information is largely irrelevant. Amazon's infrastructure has layers of abstraction to provide the scalability and manageability required for an operation at this scale. The network latency between regular EC2 instances can be surprisingly ...


4

No, VPC would not be any faster because it is almost definitely implemented as an overlay network (i.e. tunnelled packets which are transported on the same network as non-VPC connectivity is). In fact, VPC would be slightly slower because of the additional cost of encapsulation, decapsulation, and routing.


4

Honestly? I'd say you're overthinking this. Just use multiple ELBs and put the *.example.com certs on all of them. This isn't really cost prohibitive. In your entire stack, the ELB is probably going to be one of the cheapest components. This also allows you to spin up stacks from the same CloudFormation template or provisioning system. You can use the cert ...


4

Instances should register their DNS names with your DNS servers via DDNS when they start (as CNAMEs to their public AWS-assigned FQDN); that way you can refer to them by well-known name and get the most appropriate address (internal or external) regardless of where you are. Route53 probably has this sort of magic built-in, but I prefer provider-independent ...


4

Get a small 5 port switch and plug the 'internal' interface of the Cisco (the one currently going to your Draytek) into it, as well as the external interfaces of the Draytek and Juniper. At this point, you will have the same functionality you currently do (simple internet access). Simply configure the Juniper with its public IP and you are done.


3

The VPN support in Amazon VPC is designed for hardware appliances, not what are commonly known as "road warriors". (I am further going to assume your developers aren't necessarily in the same place.) You can run a VPN service on a regular Amazon EC2 instance, as long as it runs entirely on TCP or UDP. OpenVPN is a popular choice. PPTP and L2TP were ...


3

You can use a regular VPN connection to your Amazon VPC instances, they do recommend a VPN router if you want to give permanent access to it from your office or preferred location of course, but we're developing on it just with regular one to one VPN connections without any kind of issue.


3

OpenVPN is a reliable way to achieve this. Depending on your AMI, you'll have to download it through your package management system or to compile it.


3

If all you're trying to do is recover the data then why not just open the .vhd disk file? No muss, no fuss. Plenty of tools out there can open these for you.


3

Wouldn't something like Avahi work? This is even installed and nicely packaged for most Linux distributions. Just give each instance that needs to be reachable a unique hostname, and Bob's your uncle.


3

It seems from the AWS VPC documentation that the recommended approach to leveraging a DNS server inside of an AWS VPC is to first create a DHCP Options Set and associate it with the VPC. Then you can stand up 1-4 DNS servers in that VPC. Additionally, the DHCP Options Set will allow you to setup the following for all contained VPC instances. (snipped from ...


3

As Availability Zones grow over time, Amazon's ability to expand them can become constrained. If this happens, they might restrict you from launching an instance in a constrained Availability Zone unless you already have an instance in that Availability Zone. Therefore, your account might have a different number of available Availability Zones in a region ...


2

You'll need a password recovery disk. Then change the drive used by the VPC to be the physical CD drive on the machine. Then choose to boot from the CD drive when the VPC boots up.


2

Unfortunately for the Network features you are looking into VPC is the best option. Regular EC2 instances do not have Outbound filtering or ACLs. Use VPC as a pseudo private cloud, but without the dedicated hardware tunnel. You can set up Internet Gateways and set up a few public machines that route traffic for the other servers that are in a private ...


2

Open source IPSEC solutions like Open Swan running on any old linux machine will definitely do the trick. There have been several people on the Open Swan mailing list that have posted questions about doing this and eventually succeeded. Expect a complex setup process though and you'll need to be/become familiar with some lower-level network details (or pay a ...


2

If your installation media is on the MVLS website, re-download it, check the checksum and then burn it to a new DVD. This is an error that has been associated with bad media or a corrupted ISO file at burn time. If this is a TechNet license that you are entering, do not enter it at the time of installation. Sometimes this issue has come up with TechNet ...


2

Nope, AWS doesn't inherently block outbound SSH. Something else is going on.


2

You have covered the main ways to get a VPC instance in a private subnet to talk to the outside world. Have the Internet traffic for the private subnet be routed out of a VPN tunnel connected to your office, which can then provide access to the rest of the internet. Not ideal since it requires an always on VPN tunnel and an extra hop through your office. ...


2

That should be none of your concerns actually ;) I'm not trying to be mean here, but in a proper Service-oriented Architecture (SOA) you should only need to know respective contracts/interfaces/protocols to obey, alongside some Service-level Agreement (SLA) eventually. In addition, Amazon is notoriously secretive about the actual hardware in use, e.g. many ...


2

Wondering if you had any luck? I found an Amazon support thread that basically says Watchguard can't support BGP over the VPN tunnels, but they are looking at adding the support in a future release of their firewall software (Watchguard feature #RFE41534). See https://forums.aws.amazon.com/message.jspa?messageID=198172 Hope this helps... if you get it ...


2

I've actually run into a very similar problem. There's a few gotchyas with acronis which drive me nuts. First, images in older versions don't always work in newer versions. Second, each version has a slightly different structure, so manually trying to rip them apart and piece them back together is a nightmare. Your best bet, is to create a virtual HD, ...


2

An alternate method would be to use the VMware vCenter Converter Standalone 5 to convert the tib image into a vmdk and then convert that into a vhd using the StarWind V2V converter.


2

You can't assign IPs to virtual interfaces via DHCP, they have to be statically assigned. The reason is that for a DHCP server, there's only one device eth1 that's indistiguishable from eth1:1 (because they share the same MAC). You can statically assign an IP this way: auto eth1:1 iface eth1:1 inet static address x.x.x.x netmask x.x.x.x


2

From the information in your question, I assume you have 2 EIP's in use. One for the NAT server and one for the Web server. If that is the case, then the NAT server and everyone in the world should be able to connect to the Web server via its EIP fine, assuming all firewall/security groups are correct. Now, I'm confused what the NAT server is actually ...



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