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1

We ran into the same issue. It ended up being a setting within IIS and it was set to an old IP address with in Web Management Service. Double check that also.


1

OK, facepalm time. The issue is that the VoIP server (murmurd) is running on the same machine that runs the VPN server (pptpd).


0

Add an SLA monitor Using sla monitor we can have the ASA do a continuous ping over the tunnel to keep it always up. Here’s a config to ping an IP over the tunnel every 5 seconds, forever. sla monitor 1 type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho 10.1.2.2 interface OUTSIDE frequency 5 exit sla monitor schedule 1 life forever start-time now The point of this is ...


1

The problem was not in Shorewall config at all. There actually WAS access from VPN to the Internet, but VPN clients had wrong DNS server address. There was a line in OpenVPN's server.conf push "dhcp-option DNS 192.168.0.1" Which didn't make sense in given setup. I corrected the address, and now VPN clients do have access to the Internet.


1

Duplicate your existing P2 (click the + to the right of it), change local from 10.0.2.0/24, leaving same 10.172.0.0/16 remote. Do the same, flipping local and remote, on "other router." Then you'll be able to communicate between.


1

The ADSL modem should have the possibility to bridge its ADSL and Ethernet interfaces, so that your Mikrotik router would get the public IP directly from your ISP. So, change your ADSL modem from the current routed mode to bridged mode, and you should get what you want.


0

This is another short solution. Download & Install the client: # wget -q http://kb.arubacloud.com/files/tar-gz/forticlientsslvpn_linux_4-0-2281-tar.aspx -O fortisslvpn.tgz && tar -xzf fortisslvpn.tgz # cd forticlientsslvpn && ./helper/setup.linux.sh Press Ctrl+C, Agree Their License (1st time only) & then connect to VPN by: # yes ...


0

Thank you @Jarett I added this to /etc/ppp/options.pptpd: refuse-pap refuse-chap refuse-mschap require-mschap-v2 require-mppe-128 Then I should use the account and password in /etc/ppp/chap-secrets to login. The reason I forget to mention the content in /etc/ppp/options.pptpd, they were: name pptpd ms-dns 8.8.8.8 ms-dns 8.8.4.4 Then I connected ...


1

I recently had this issue with only 1 of 2 SAs activating. I solved this by double checking sh run crypto map My ikev1 and ikev2 commands matched, but one side was misign crypto map WAN_map 1 set pfs After adding that command (substituting your actual crypto map name), and generating traffic from the initiator side, both SAs came up succesfully.


1

Remove the registry key and then restart the service. Connstore.Dat will automatically update with a new key after you restart the service.


0

You can check the contents of /etc/ppp/chap-secrets. The username and password that can connect to the VPN server are stored there. The contents of the file should look like this: $ cat /etc/ppp/chap-secrets # Secrets for authentication using CHAP # client server secret IP addresses username1 pptpd password1 * username2 pptpd ...


-2

Seems you have a weak password and cracked,the man post your ip and your pass somewhere, making your vpn server a public server,please rename your user and pass.


0

After a lot of a research, and trial and error, it turns out this is pretty easy to do. You do have to run multiple instances, one per bridge, in order to isolate all of the users to their respective networks. You just add a new .conf file for each instance and Debian will automatically create a new instance per .conf file. Just make sure you use different ...


1

I once did something like this for individually firewalling each user's connection. I have implemented it using the learn-address script in OpenVPN which is called when a user connects or disconnects. I have adapted it for your use case. The script looks as follows: #!/bin/bash statedir=/tmp/ function bwlimit-enable() { ip=$1 user=$2 # ...


0

If you install/configure/start a VPN Server (e.g. using OpenVPN) in your AWS Envirnoment you can connect to your VPC with your client machine.


0

Problem fixed. 1) I did not properly follow Michael's config directions. I also configured a rightsourceip and leftsourceip together, thereby causing both instances to believe they were both initiators. I ensured that one was an initiator and one was a requestor; this fixed the IKE problem. 2) I figured out that I also had to explicitly set the esp ...


1

It sounds like your client is configured to use a different DNS search suffix. Check your DNS configuration when you are connected to the VPN and see what the DNS search suffix is (I realise you say you checked the DNS settings, but I don't know to what detail you checked them. Did you just check that the right DNS server was being queried, or did you check ...


0

My guess is that I need a second interface on A in order to have: Correct. You can specify name of TUN/TAP interface by adding to VPN config file: dev tapX or dev tunX On client use: no bind option or specify other port by adding to server: port 119X and to client remote address:119X Enable ip forrward @ server 1 & 2. Setup routing, every fragment ...


0

Have a look at the man page for ssh, it gives you a great example in there: man ssh SSH-BASED VIRTUAL PRIVATE NETWORKS ssh contains support for Virtual Private Network (VPN) tunnelling using the tun(4) network pseudo-device, allowing two networks to be joined securely. The sshd_config(5) configuration option PermitTunnel controls whether the server sup- ...


0

so it seemed that the problem was not route tables or so on, but the strongswan configuration on both client and server. I set all the left and right subnets on both client and server config to right values and also the left and right firewalls to true and restarted both side and since then it it working. I can ping from anywhere the other side of network.


0

Your problem is probably routing, Ubuntu server has to know where to find 192.168.0.0/24 - route add -net 192.168.0.0/24 gw 172.20.1.100, without that this route matches at default gateway and packets are routed using wrong interface. Every device that forwards packets (OpenWRT and Ubuntu) has to know about 3 networks: 192.168.0.0/24, 192.168.1.0/24 and ...


3

Depends on your budget, but I'd pick up a few Cisco ASA 5505 or 5506-x units at ~$550 each. Industry standard, reasonably easy to configure and no babysitting. If you have dynamic IPs at any of the locations, maybe a Cisco Meraki unit with Auto-VPN functionality. Substitute Cisco with Juniper, Sonicwall, whatever. But I don't advocate homebrew ...


2

It really all boil down on the amount of internet bandwidth you have and how much of it you want be able to use for your VPNs. Even low end firewalls (under 500/600 euros) are capable of 50+ Mb/s of AES128 encrypted bandwidth (es: Sonicwall SOHO serie). For a even lower price (maintaining good performance) you can use Mikrotik's firewall. If easy ...


3

The best way to go is to self sign it, as it is still in development. Why? Certificate authorities can be compromised and form an easier target. Your server can also be compromised but it's less likely. But that's a whole other discussion. Still the way I should do it is create a company CA (if you don't already have it), sign a certificate against it and ...


1

In VPC, the public IP address of an instance is never bound to the instance's stack, so you have to configure both the internal private address and the external public address. The invalid argument is presumably caused by trying to source traffic directly from the public IP address, which isn't known to your instance. left=10.10.10.10 # instance ...


0

The corporate people will need to tell you how you're needing to connect to the VPN. Ipsec is common and so is openVPN but they need to tell you what VPN method they're using. You should not need to do any special configuration on your system to connect.


2

Most likely, what they want is for there to be no other connections active on the computer you will be using for business. In other words, it should not have any connectivity to any other computers or devices in your house. It should have no other routes to the outside world other than through the corporate VPN. A VPN on one computer should not have any ...


1

Configure SSH to allow connections on the outside interface without VPN from only your IP address or IP range for the duration of the migration, then disable that again. That way you can access the ASAs regardless of the VPN being up, which is definitely a good thing when making VPN changes. If you can't do that, you can edit each configuration file in a ...


0

What if you add a static route on your servers telling them that in order to reach 10.128.0.0/20 they have to go through the VPN's server LAN address? route add 10.128.0.0 mask 255.255.240.0 a.b.c.d Substitute a.b.c.d with the VPN server's LAN address. This will, at least, rule out problems with amazon's routing.


1

You don't say what VPN software you are using. This comes down to a routing issue. Here's something to get you started from the Linux Advanced Routing and Traffic Control Howto: http://lartc.org/howto/lartc.rpdb.multiple-links.html Under OpenVPN, you can do this on the client side or server side. On the client: redirect-gateway def1 allow-pull-fqdn ...


1

There is no way to do this without introducing a very large amount of complexity, resource contention, and instability into the environment. You'll just need to buckle down and renumber one of the VPCs.


1

Well, maybe. Please remember that without AD global security, anything you try to control with file ACLs will only work on the one server that is implementing VPN, i.e. without AD you only have LOCAL accounts for both VPN authentication and the FILE ACLs you wish to set. AD might be worth considering for this ..... So as long as the VPN and file server ...


1

You didn't post your openvpn config, but I'm guessing you're missing the route to the rest of the LAN: push "route 192.168.182.0 255.255.255.240" This will add the necessary route on the client when they connect. Also, make sure that the other clients on your LAN know to use the OpenVPN server as their gateway for the OpenVPN network.


1

No, the AWS DNS servers will return the public hostnames for the instances in the remote region. Your only recourse is to set up internal dns servers for this purpose.


0

Just had this problem myself and found this, without a useful solution. After a few hours i figured it out! Just use this: mode server tls-server and remove: server-bridge And the DHCP will pass directly to the client!


0

The newer versions of XenDesktop authenticate by using what you could call a "fake" VPN. If your external citrix URL was https://citrix.company.com then it would flow like this: Client --> citrix.company.com --> Virtual IP gets created --> Access is granted based on client credentials --> "VPN" is created --> Desktop is streamed back to user In a nutshell ...


0

The Best soft I found when I stopped using LogMeIn was Teamviewer, still using it ! And it is free for personal use: https://www.teamviewer.com Otherwise, you would indeed need VPN to connect your computer on the same network, and then allow remote access. Teamviewer allows you to do that without the VPN part, as LogMeIn would (But I find it easier to ...


0

Im sorry about my English. I have same problem and after..... many hours........... I see a option in the Networks Interfaces..... need edit the Interface LAN when you have the connection Server VPN and check box Set as default gateway Cant upload image.... cos my first post here.



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