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When you launched the VPN, that would normally take over the network thus changing network configuration. That might have been the cause why RDP was disconnected. Since you cannot connect to your VPN or RDP, unless you can access it via terminal, I don't think you have other options.


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This can be done by running a VPN client in your site office1 (connected to the client network VPN server) and a VPN server in your site office1 and a VPN client in your site office2 (connected to your server in office1) Depending on your network and VPN setup you need to create certain routing rules or bridging configuration in your site office1 to ...


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The ASR is going to support IPSec, so you'll need to set up an IPSec association between that and your Linux server.


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Quite the obvious answer, but I'll drop it here just in case it helps. This mainly depends on the kind of work you do for your client and the networking load you can handle at your office but there's always the option of connecting to office1 from office2 over ssh and then to client.


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if red-hat OS Based grep openvpn /var/log/messages if Debian based grep openvpn /var/log/syslog


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You can follow two approaches. To have a 100% routed setup, with no NAT involved, do the following: on the remote office's firewall (the one with 192.168.2.0/24 network), create a VPN tunnel having local lan defined as 192.168.2.0/24 and remote lan defined as 192.168.0.0/16 on the hub firewall, create a VPN (to your remote office) having local lan defined ...


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Setting the IP camera's default gateway to the IP of the Raspberry Pi should make it accessible at least from the vpn subnet (as a last resort solution, if you are not able to define routes on your router). As an alternative you could also add the routes from below (site B) to the IP camera, if that is possible. From a network perspective it is cleaner to ...


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The other thing I was considering is do I need to set the IP cameras default gateway to be that of the IP of the Raspberry Pi? YES. Only Raspberry Pi knows where to send traffic targeted to VPN. Another option is iptables setup with SNAT/MASQUERADE on Raspberry Pi so every connection from VPN network will have source IP set to Raspberry Pi IP.


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For a MAC running Junos Pulse 5.x, run the following script: #!/bin/bash # stop pulse access service # remove local guid from connstore.dat # restart service sudo launchctl unload /Library/LaunchDaemons/net.juniper.AccessService.plist sudo rm -rf "/Library/Application Support/Juniper Networks/Junos Pulse/DeviceId" sudo sed -i .bak "/guid/d" ...


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I wrote a python program to wrap ipsec that installs iptables entries to allow docker containers to talk to the VPN tunnel: https://github.com/cbrichford/docker-ipsec Instead of doing: ipsec up You do: docker-ipsec up This script might need some work for use with the latest docker networking features, but worked with the old default docker0 bridge. If ...


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Turn off and clear iptables and perform a connection test. If it works, more than likely you don't have to proper iptables config to make pptp work. If it works with iptables cleared and disabled, then you should probably read this: PPTP IPTables routing issue


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I assume you use redirect-gateway so all traffic is going thru VPN and home server is on different subnet then your desktop/laptop. Easiest solution is to put server and desktop on the same subnet. Other solution is to force routing to this server via your home gateway router. In OpenVPN client config add: route <home_server_IP> net_gateway This ...


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I finally found out the solution, the logs are placed in the user appdata folder. So you should just go to: %APPDATA%/Fortinet/SslvpnClient/LogFiles/ Unfortunately those logs are not terribly useful (at least in the case I checked), but still might have something interesting.


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You need to set up an additional routing table for that interface. I assume that your tunnel has ip address 10.10.0.10, subnet 255.255.255.0 and gateway 10.10.0.1. Edit /etc/iproute2/rt_tables and add a new routing table with name rt_tunnel and preference 1 at the end 1 rt_tunnel Configure the routing table. We add the reachable network and its default ...


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It turns out aws does't allow a tunnel to set up when the subnet we want to route to doesn't match defined subnets on the aws vpc. Because we only have a /24 subnet defined at aws, we couldn't send a /16 over there. only once we decreased the routing mask to /24 would the ipsec vpn connect properly. We were expecting amazon to allow this and just drop all ...


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Use nohup and wrap your command in backticks nohup `sudo openvpn client.conf`


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If you have installed OpenVPN via an RPM or DEB package on Linux, the installer will have set up an initscript so that OpenVPN is started on startup. When executed, the initscript will scan for .conf configuration files in /etc/openvpn, and if found, will start up a separate OpenVPN daemon for each file. If you do not want this to happen at startup just ...


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Does the VPN have a DHCP scope that doesn't intersect with the LAN? - clearly, they can't have the same IP address on the LAN extension (VPN). presumably they are getting an IP address from the VPN gateway and they both also just happen to have the same local IP addresses on their home networks, if that's the case I would look at what the VPN is doing, if it ...


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I read the instructions on: https://openvpn.net/index.php/open-source/documentation/howto.html#scope And I've added route 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 to the server.conf on my VPS and also iroute 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 to the correspondig ccd file for the client. And then I used the command route add -net 192.168.1.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 gw 10.8.0.6 and ...


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You can stop Internet access from the VPN by disabling internet routing to the VPN. "routing and remote access" on the windows server is where you would configure this . Depending on your OS this url may help configure remote client activity logging . https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj592691.aspx Search terms like "enable remote gateway" , ...


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Configure your firewall rules to not allow traffic other than what is required. Then you won't have to worry about what the customer does. As far as auditing what the customer is doing? Well packet captures and netflow come to mind.


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I have a simple solution that I'm using at a co-working space that has a conflicting IP range (10.x) I connected to the network with my mobile phone, then I shared the network connection via bluetooth with my laptop. I can now use the VPN for my remote employer. I'm sure this will work just the same via USB if you need a faster connection.


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Certificate's CN means certificate's Common Name and should always match the correct hostname to which your IP is resolving. Suppose you are connecting to x.x.x.x IP that resolves to "mysstpvpn.mydomain.com". The certificate you should bind on the SSTP server, should be a certificate containing that certain CN which on this example is: ...


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In a Cisco ASA remote access VPN you do not have the option of adding multiple AAA server groups for a single connection profile. Since each AAA server group is limited to one protocol you cannot have both RADIUS and LOCAL as valid authentication servers on one connection profile. The only way to do that is for LOCAL to be the fallback AAA server group, ...



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