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0

Whatever performance problem you're experiencing (or planning to experience - because trust me, it will happen) is due to the RAM. Even for a single site and an SQL database, 512 MB of RAM is too low, let alone several sites and game servers. Separate each service into its own server or VM (especially the game servers - I wouldn't trust them in terms of ...


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If you are running PHP on Apache, I don't think so. If you are running Tomcat like i am, then yes, Java threads will run on each CPU. So it very much depends on what you are doing. Of course, if you have a web server and database, then each should be able to run on a different CPU, and that should improve performance as well. I am running 512Mb server on ...


-1

Most of OpenBSD’s internal daemons are already privilege separated and chrooted.


1

No, you're not wasting your money. Here's what you're getting with this setup - instant scalability, plus upgrade flexibility. Consider the small start-up that hosts everything on one box: as they ramp up, suddenly the need to offload one of the services, but now they've got a lot more historical data to migrate, and now they're busy, both in terms of ...


1

I have never experienced issue such as long load times like that, however one thing I have noticed that tend to speed up my Wordpress load times is to use WP Super Cache. It caches the pages as plain HTML pages for most users, that way your server doesn't need to recompile the page every time. As others have said, it could be poor server performance on ...


1

I'm afraid your experience is clearly insufficient to deal with such issues. You probably should hire someone to either supervise the server for you, or at least get it straight now (and get rid of cPanel). He might even tell you it is not a server issue, but rather WordPress thing. You should start with looking at the load itself (CPU, memory, I/O, etc., ...


0

There is a way to allow connection from all IPs when it comes to MySQL. If it in in user definition you need to create your user like this: grant all privileges on databasename.* to 'username'@'%' identified by 'usernamepassword'; flush privileges; This % after @ means there are no restriction on the ip address connecting to DB. You can also take a look ...


2

To me it looks like that the plugin does simply so heavy processing for every request that the requests take such a long time. You should ask the plugin provider if they can explain the slowdown in any way.


1

As Craig Watson already told, you should not mess with PHP memory limit if not really necessary. Anyway, it is not possible to correctly size the server without a profound understanding of your workload. I suggest you to simulate a realistic load and in the meanwhile to monitor your server resource allocation/usage. For what it matters, 512 MB are very few ...


2

TL;DR - Don't bump your memory limits for the sake of it. For a standard PHP application like WordPress, 128MB is huge and should be enough for 90% of your needs. However, there are a few important facts here: PHP Memory Allocation is per-script/process As per the PHP documentation for the max_memory option: This sets the maximum amount of memory in ...


0

You measure. You run it at your workplace in a VM of similar specs and put a load test on it. Simple like that. Given that any half decent tablet can run visualization that is also not really an issue.


6

You might know what a core is from shopping for desktops and laptops. It's the CPU, the processor, the bit that does the work. Here's a wikipedia link that might help. I plugged your site into this tool and most of the complaints were CSS and javascript that had to fully download before your site could fully render. Of course, I imagine we're viewing the ...


0

On your VPS add this configuration on your VirtualHost ProxyPass / http://mysubdomain.mydomain.com:7080 ProxyPassRevers / http://mysubdomain.mydomain.com:7080 You should have proxy module enabled.


2

Bandwidth consumption is more complicated than what can be described with just a single number. However the exact scenario you are asking about can mostly be explained by looking at two measures. What is the actual link speed and what is the monthly quota? Link speeds are usually measured in megabits per second (Mb/s for short). Typically those ranges from ...


2

If you have a means to console into the server you should do so during a high load time and see what processes are hogging the most CPU usage. You may discover that you can disable or modify certain protocols to lower overhead. As stated in the other answer, if your RAM usage is not peaking and your CPU is, than your CPU is the bottleneck.


2

If you do not saturate your RAM, then it is not necessary to add it. However, consider that additional RAM should improve your i/o speed by virtue of disk caching. So, if your workload is read-mostly and you are suffering of high CPU iowait time, adding more RAM can be useful.


0

Install xdebug and turn on profiling. Then use a utility like wincachegrind or kcachegrind to drill down to see what's taking the time. Check out http://www.xdebug.org/docs/profiler for more info.


1

Maybe fail2ban is blocking you after a few minutes of failed login attempts. Even if you're not sending those, someone else is. If the fail2ban rule is too broad, it could be locking you out. If that's not it, then you should check to see if you're able to connect by telnet to port 22 on your host.


2

Obviously it isn’t okay. Why would it be? It’s a BSOD. You wouldn’t kill the init process on Linux, so why would it be okay to do so on Windows? Update Apparently, they don’t support shutdown via ACPI (which is not that cool) but simply “kill the power”. You should encourage them to implement a ACPI power button solution. It’s what VirtualBox does and it ...



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