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DNS data is cached. If you didn't reduce the TTL before the move, then entries can be cached until they time out. If you can configure your old server to defer rather than reject email arriving from the Internet, the messages should eventually be delivered to the correct server. Alternatively, and likely more appropriately configure the Exim server to ...


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You could use something like python-gnupg to have a file encrypted with gnupg. To achieve "real" security you need to put a passphrase to the private key, otherwise you have the encrypted file containing the password and the private key in the same server, so decrypting the file would be trivial. The bad thing of having a passphrase everytime you start your ...


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If your http directory root is same as https then following vhost should work for you or you may need to make changes appropriately. This will overwrite whatever Doc root you have for default:80 in http.conf. <VirtualHost *:80> #Admin email, Server Name (domain name), and any aliases ServerAdmin webadmin@breakwatersurf.com ServerName ...


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Check the vhost config you have for *:80 , it seems you have Indexing enabled. You need to add DirectoryIndex index.html so that it results in you index.html. If a URL which maps to a directory is requested, and there is no DirectoryIndex (e.g., index.html) in that directory, then mod_autoindex will return a formatted listing of the directory. Refer: ...


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Yes, it might have to do with your conf files. Check to make sure the DocumentRoot is the same for the https and non-https virtual hosts. If you aren't sure how to find out what that is, you can enable mod_info (see the top of http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.2/mod/mod_info.html) and then pull up the info page and see what the DocumentRoot is set to, then ...


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I am going to share my findings in this answer, hoping that will help someone in the future. These findings would be impossible without the prompt observation in @EEAA's comment. Indeed the restriction comes from the OpenVZ software. The numothersock restriction can be seen in /proc/user_beancounters and according to the documentation: 'UBC resources in ...


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This would be security through obscurity, but there is hardly any other option. If you want to make life hard for the potential thief, I would suggest embedding the key inside the script, and later converting the script into an executable using shc. You might also want to obfuscate the elf itself (Methods to obfuscate an elf.) Keep in mind however, that ...


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Now we know your htaccess damage is, weirdly, intentional, here some suggestions towards a true solution: Your webserver is badly configured and causes many many error log writes. This in itself causes unnecessary IO disk writes and should be fixed. Fix all those errors (Especially around SSL) and your server will already be more capable. Or suppress error ...


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PHP on the command line does not use Apache php_admin_value. You can use php -d "suhosin.executor.func.blacklist=" e.php Or use a custom php.ini file: php -n -c php.ini e.php Or configure php-cli with a custom php.ini file (check php --ini) - usually something like /etc/php5/cli/php.ini.


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You need the --multihome option. Don't use --local because it is incompatible with a multihome situation. Also, you need to be 100% sure your routing table is good to go with a multihome setup. Linux users should check their distribution details, in particular: /sbin/ip rule list You should see at least 1 rule for each specific IP address your clients ...


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Absolutely, you can add additional CMS at subdirectories with wget utility. wget retrieves files from World Wide Web (WWW) using widely used protocols like HTTP, HTTPS and FTP. You will just have to create directories through shell or midnight commander utility, navigate to specific directory where you want to download the CMS and fire wget command. As an ...


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Assuming you're using Apache as your webserver, you'll need to add virtual host entries for each domain name you want to serve.


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The best way to check nameservers is to dig it or ping it. You will have to just fire following commands from terminal. dig n1.yournameservers.com ping n1.yournameservers.com Result of above commands should show your IP address. Currently your website is using nameservers of cloudflare: clark.ns.cloudflare.com. ['173.245.59.87'] ...


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Run nmap on the IP address that the name mail.example.com resolves to. Nmap will list all open ports on the machine. In the /etc/postfix/master.conf under the smptd you can add ports



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