Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

30

In my opinion, the value has to be exactly 16. Magic Packet Technology (whitepaper, publication #20213) was developed between AMD and Hewlett Packard circa 1995. From page 2: "Since an Ethernet controller already has built-in address matching circuitry..." they propose reusing it, adding a counter "to count up the 16 duplications of the IEEE ...


18

Yes. It's simple and the chance that someone sends this data accidentally is effectively zero. You want simple because a very low-powered microcontroller in the NIC has to be able to permanently watch the raw ethernet network traffic and act if it sees this pattern and you don't want to turn on systems by accident because a stream of random network data is ...


12

According to AMD's spec the destination doesn't have to be the all-ones address. It can also be the receiving station's address or a multicast address. The payload is a different story. It must be the sequence ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff followed by the receiving station's MAC address repeated 16 times. The presence of absence of the station's entry in the switch's ...


10

Yes it is, so long as you have a fairly new wireless card - Intel vPro branded machines do have this feature. You could also use Intel AMT (which can be made available over Wireless) to power up machines. Technically, WoWLAN support within the operating system needs to be present as well - Windows 7 comes with this kind of support. ...


10

You can use the PowerCfg utility to find out. It's part of Vista, no need to download it. powercfg -lastwake Will tell you what woke up your laptop. To see all devices that can wake your computer, try: powercfg -devicequery wake_armed You can turn all these devices off with Device Manager, on the Power Management tab. Unselect "Allow this device to ...


10

From the Wikipedia Entry on Wake on LAN The Magic Packet is a broadcast frame containing anywhere within its payload 6 bytes of ones (resulting in hexadecimal FF FF FF FF FF FF) followed by sixteen repetitions of the target computer's MAC address.


10

I'm using WOL, the interface is simple enough but you can do a lot with it. It's a freeware. It might be what's you're looking for.


9

I think that it is mainly a way to make sure that only a magic packet will actually wake up the computer. As the packets are scanned for this sequence without looking at any protocol headers (e.g., IP addresses, port numbers), the packet needs to be easily identifiable and the number of false positives close to zero. The probability that a random network ...


8

Yes. Since the mappings expire after some time (generally it's 4 hours if I recall correctly), it needs to be broadcast so it has a chance of reaching the target machine after the mappings are gone. Edit: Correction: If the mappings expire, the message is broadcast anyway. The only reason why you would need to use broadcast is in case the machine ...


8

As far as I'm aware you need to run a cable from the WoL NIC to the motherboard.


7

You could use /etc/rc.local or some system boot scripts, but this wouldn't be the best way to do it. On startup your network interfaces are configured, sure, but there are other times when your network interfaces may be brought up or down and you will need this executed during those times. You want to edit /etc/network/interfaces: You should have a line ...


7

Hardware, and the associated firmware that runs on that hardware. It is OS independent. There are a plethora of WoL utilities to send a "wake up" packet (sometimes called a Magic Packet). Try the port/package management system in your OS (or Google it). It's usually as easy as wol [MAC Address]


6

I don't have any issues with using WoL on a Dell R300 running VMware ESXi and that definitely doesn't support hibernation. Enable WoL in the BIOS, power it off and give it a go. If WoL proves awkward the 2900 also supports remote power management via IPMI - if you download the Dell IPMI command line tools and enable the BMC you can check the power state of ...


6

Old thread but I wanted to chime in because it is still the top rated search result for "wol over vpn". Yes the WOL magic packet is defined within the constrains of layer 2 but this does not mean it cannot be contained inside a network and transport protocol entity which can then be used to route it across the VPN. The reason for this is the "magic" ...


6

I use command line and GUI implentations for WakeOnLan available from Depicus.


5

I find that it depends a lot more on the motherboard then the network adapter when using addon cards. I have seen it work with Intel and 3Com cards.


5

The easiest way to set this up is to disable DHCP on the two wireless routers. Configure the wireless routers with static IP addresses on the LAN ports using the 10.0.10.0 subnet (IPs that aren't being used by DHCP or another device with a static IP). Set the WAN port for DHCP (or set it to another subnet that you'll never use). Then unplug the cable from ...


5

Wake On Lan involves sending a "magic packet" which contains the MAC address of the destination computer. There's a lot of detail here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wake-on-LAN The best way to send a WOL request from one Linux box to another is ether-wake. If you're looking for it in Fedora, install the net-tools package: $ yum whatprovides ...


5

See man 5 ethers; basically, put MAC / hostname pairs in your /etc/ethers. Then etherwake will be able to wake them.


5

It sounds like some reading-up on WOL is probably in order first. Some additional reading about Ethernet, ARP, and UDP/IP is probably in order, too. The WOL behavior in a client is triggered by a "magic packet". The magic packet can be encapsulated in any type of transport (UDP over IP, IPX, etc). The magic packet byte sequence just needs to be in the ...


5

For WOL, you don't need to integrate the interface into the system, it doesn't need an IP address or anything else. All that is needed is that the system wakes up if it receives an WOL signal, which is handled by the BIOS, outside the control of any operating system. So, in Linux just configure only the interface that you need and you are done.


5

16 because it's dead easy logic to count to 16. Repeating the MAC address because there is already address matching logic on the chip. AMD white paper


5

To decrypt the boot volume you'll have to use some kind of lights-out management or Intelligent Platform Management Interface (IPMI). This will give you a remote console onto the server so you can type in that passphrase. Common examples of this are the ILO on HP servers or the DRAC on Dell servers. If you're sending a WOL packet, I really doubt there's a ...


4

The particular details depend on the OS they are running but the basics are the same -- and simple. shutdown -- a scheduled task is run on each machine at the appropriate time that calls the shutdown command for a clean halt. Use job scheduler or cron, whichever is the one you have. wake up -- all machines will have to support Wake on LAN (WOL) and have it ...


4

Servers are designed to be powered on 24x7, so it's not surprising that they lack BIOS support for WOL. In instances where you need to be able to programmatically power on a server, I typically use IPMI, via a remote management card. HP provides this through their iLO cards, and I suspect that Dell does via their DRAC cards as well, but I don't have personal ...


4

I know you can set ethernet0.wakeOnPkctRcv = "TRUE" in the VM's .vmx file but I can't say I've tested it myself sorry.


4

Typically no since the "MagicPacket" is actually at layer 2. It's not even routable without the assistance of forwarders (e.g. IP helper).


4

I've seen Wake-on-LAN advertised on PCI NIC cards way back when 100MB Ethernet was fairly new at the desktop. Back then, integrated network cards were not yet standard (but becoming so). That said, WoL for non-integrated components is a function of BIOS support. It needs to keep enough power on the peripheral bus, whatever you're using, and needs to allow ...


3

Your router is supported by OpenWRT. You can install it on that box and then use ssh (on windows putty) to access your router from anywhere in the world. Then you can run the wakeonlan utility on the box itself to wake up the machine in question. Wake on lan packets only work on a local networks (it is not routable as it is Layer2 traffic). There is an ...


3

Something is sending a wake on lan to the computer. Probably your patching server or SMS server as it thinks that something needs to be installed on the machine.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible