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7

Create a virtual host for each site. You can run them all on port 80 (or 443). This problem is exactly what virtual hosts are for. There's no requirement that each virtual host have a unique domain, only a unique hostname. See Name-based Virtual Hosts.


4

This answer is also "no", but it focuses a little more on the why. The target of a CNAME alias (or a NS delegation for that matter) receives no information from the other nameserver. The second nameserver receives queries as a result, but none of those queries convey any information that would indicate that such an action had taken place. You also have no ...


4

If the website IP gets hit will the other IP go down? It will probably. DDoS works by generating high network traffic with a host, thus consuming all its bandwidth and creating a high CPU or disk load on it: if the traffic arrives on the server machine through any of the IPs it has, the other ones will be affected as well, if they share the same network ...


2

Yes, that is entirely possible. Actually CGI isn't that much used in web developing anymore. PHP and other languages are mainly used for web developing.


2

Yes. dig example.com axfr will perform a zone transer (or ls -d example.com if you use nslookup). You can then parse for CNAME records in the zone you just transferred. However, zone transfers aren't typically allowed willy nilly, so you'll need to allow transfer of the zone. You have the power to do that, right? Of course you do. Because only bad people ...


2

What you need are called glue records: What is a glue record? Essentially, without a glue record, your nameserver definition would be calling itself recursively; i.e., to resolve, ns1.mysite.com, first you have to resolve mysite.com, one step up.


2

Looking up the domain poc.co.in in the nameservers shows that it is registered with the co.in authority. It has two nameservers, ns1.poc.co.in and ns1.poc.co.in, both of which resolve to the same IP address 115.118.115.167. (This is bad practice; for two nameservers you should have two different addresses.) The nameserver on 115.118.115.167 is responding to ...


1

No, there is not. The main reason being that many/most domains (or rather, Name Servers) will not give you a list of all the records (names) they have. You'd have to brute-force all possible names on all domain servers everywhere.



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