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I'm assuming that you have created DNS zones for your website. You don't need to have your domain DNS pointing to the new server, but you need to create a DNS zone to open that website with only IP on your machine. How to do that is out of the scope of your question. You could access your website only with an IP, It doesn't matter if IP isn't dedicated. ...


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A couple of things I would recommend disabling are 'Client for Microsoft Networks' and 'File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks'. To get to those, go to the Network and Sharing Center, click on Change adapter settings, and then right click the network card(s) and select Properties. Just untick the network services you don't need. There may be ...


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In a Unix-style file system, an index node, informally referred to as an inode, is a data structure used to represent a filesystem object, which can be one of various things including a file or a directory. Wikipedia You may check the inode usage with the command df -i Use this command to find which root folder have an unusually high number of ...


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To over-simplify, an inode is an entry in the filesystem's database. An inode can represent a directory or a file, among other things. If you have run out of inodes, then you likely have too many files on your volume. If you can, delete some files or move them to another volume. Another option might be to tar or compress a bunch of files in to one file. See ...


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Your listed third option is when clientsite1 is accessed via https. The certificate error is because your SSL certificate is (only) for clientsite2. Here are your options: You want clientsite1 to be accessible via SSL, via a single IP You need a multidomain SSL certificate that has both clientsite1 and clientsite2 listed. Your SSL vHost configuration ...


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Looking up the domain poc.co.in in the nameservers shows that it is registered with the co.in authority. It has two nameservers, ns1.poc.co.in and ns1.poc.co.in, both of which resolve to the same IP address 115.118.115.167. (This is bad practice; for two nameservers you should have two different addresses.) The nameserver on 115.118.115.167 is responding to ...


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What you need are called glue records: What is a glue record? Essentially, without a glue record, your nameserver definition would be calling itself recursively; i.e., to resolve, ns1.mysite.com, first you have to resolve mysite.com, one step up.



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