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Using /dev/random is meant to be reserved for things which truly need to be cryptographically secure, such as private key material, because it relies on an entropy pool which can be depleted rapidly if the RNG is overused. Unless for some reason you think the NSA might want to influence the results of your card games? So /dev/urandom, a PRNG which never ...


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Normally all people who share the same area code as you are not your neighbors but live in your house, right? An IPv4 IP-address is a 32 bit number, typically written down as four decimal octets: [0-255].[0-255].[0-255].[0-255]. If the ip-addresses of those other sites are exactly the same the one for your website, then odds are that your site is running ...


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There are different tasks, which you want to do in the same time. Actually, there are 3. You want version control. You want a dropbox-like shared filesystem. You want a webhosting. The good news is that you can do these everywhere, if you have at least a simple sftp account to a simple webhosting. The bad news, that it isn't dropbox, thus you will ...


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I'm not familer with any service which allow you to run PHP with there storage. But I can tell you how i would do this, Buy a VPS Install the LAMP/LNMP stack Install BTSync / for simple file sharing and syncing Install git / svn for version control


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What you describe is not possible without doing some extra work. You can achieve this in two ways Configuring Tomcat's HTTP connector in server.xml to listen on port 80 and configure your app to run in the ROOT context. Add an Apache HTTPD (or NGINX if that suits your taste) reverse proxy which listens on port 80 and connects locally to your Tomcat ...


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DNS translates host names to IP addresses only. It cannot forward ports or URLs. The simplest solution would be to run the application on your server on port 80 and run in the ROOT context. Make the home page one of the defaults or override it as defined in the Tomcat FAQs. Your domain provider generally provides basic DNS services and you should be able ...


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If it is actually your server (or even one you rent - as long as you have root/admin access) sure! If it is a shared hosting account, or a fully managed server and you don't have root/admin access, then sadly no. Most webhosting accounts are shared hosting. If you're not sure which it is, you probably have shared hosting.


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Is that something you would recommend? Sure, if it makes sense for your situation. what are the pros and cons? You could save money by hosting multiple websites on one server. One server also acts as a single point of failure. You'll also lose the ability to scale the websites independently. Can you recommend the best approach to configure AWS to ...



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