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1

The following has been tested on Scientific Linux: <VirtualHost *:80> DocumentRoot "/var/www/html/siteA" Alias /siteB/ "/var/www/html/siteB/" <Directory "/var/www/html/siteB/"> Order allow,deny Allow from all AllowOverride All </Directory> Alias /siteC/ "/var/www/html/siteC/" <Directory ...


0

Likely you're looking for ngxtop. Real-time metrics for nginx server ngxtop parses your nginx access log and outputs useful, top-like, metrics of your nginx server. So you can tell what is happening with your server in real-time.


0

There is nothing specially that mounting a file system in directory /mnt or some other location you wish. /mnt and its sub-directories offers temporary mount points for mounting storage devices like CDROM, USB storage devices and more. From the question, I mean you are asking how to write or upload a new file in the mounted directory of CIFS ? If it is... ...


0

If this is a public facing site, verify you have an A Record for WWW and * If you don't have these explicitly defined in your DNS server, IE will sometimes crap out. Also, general IE troubleshooting dictates you should verify/clear the security/proxy settings, or set the browser back to defaults.


3

In general, it's not a good idea to mix user data with application code. You should maintain these separately, as code lives better in a repo, while data lives in a DB or a "raw" storage system - very different ways of storing information. When you say "a ton" of documents, what does that mean? If you're looking at 100s of GBs in thousands of files, then a ...


2

Normally all people who share the same area code as you are not your neighbors but live in your house, right? An IPv4 IP-address is a 32 bit number, typically written down as four decimal octets: [0-255].[0-255].[0-255].[0-255]. If the ip-addresses of those other sites are exactly the same the one for your website, then odds are that your site is running ...


1

Since you're dealing with Drupal many parts of your website configuration will not just live in code. This has been solved many times before, but I don't think it has ever been solved once and for all. There will be pain. You can ease this pain by ensuring that developers are putting as much as possible in code, through Features and custom Drupal modules, ...


4

The certificate needs to be issued for a fully qualified domain name (FQDN). You do not need to use a CNAME, and should probably simply create an A record pointing to the IP address in question. The CA issuing the cert needs to be able to verify ownership of the domain name. You can easily use a subdomain of your existing domain if you so desire. Just ...


1

When a browser uses an X.509 certificate to verify the identify of a site, it checks the name in the address bar against the names listed on the certificate itself. You will need the to know whatever name you intend to use to connect to your server with (for example your vhost or hostname) before issuing the certificate if you want users to be able to ...


0

There needs to be some sort of name for the certificate to be released, even if it's test.contoso.net. If this is an internally generated SSL cert, then it's not a big deal to revoke it and make a new one. However, if this is an SSL cert from an external vendor (e.g., Comodo, GoDaddy, Verisign, etc.) then it generally costs money or credits to revoke and ...


1

What you describe is not possible without doing some extra work. You can achieve this in two ways Configuring Tomcat's HTTP connector in server.xml to listen on port 80 and configure your app to run in the ROOT context. Add an Apache HTTPD (or NGINX if that suits your taste) reverse proxy which listens on port 80 and connects locally to your Tomcat ...


1

DNS translates host names to IP addresses only. It cannot forward ports or URLs. The simplest solution would be to run the application on your server on port 80 and run in the ROOT context. Make the home page one of the defaults or override it as defined in the Tomcat FAQs. Your domain provider generally provides basic DNS services and you should be able ...


0

One approach to deploy two web servers on the same host is to have both of them listen on port 80 on two different IPv6 addresses. IPv6 officially specify that you can assign two addresses to an interface, and there are enough IPv6 addresses that you can do this without running out of addresses. This is future proof, and your two domains can each have AAAA ...


0

Ok I figured this out - posting here for others... Basically @Tero gave me the idea to pass all the traffic through nginx. Here is how I did it: server { listen 1234 ssl; listen [::]:1234 ssl ipv6only=on; server_name your.server.ip.here; ssl_certificate /path/to/certificate/file; ssl_certificate_key /path/to/key/file; ...


0

First, you need to figure out how to set up your application to work with https. The app has to use a different port for http and https connections. If the app has no support for https, then you have to pass all the traffic through nginx. The configuration would look something like this: server { listen 1234 ssl; listen [::]:1234 ssl ipv6only=on; ...


1

Run nginx on different port by changing your configuration (conf/nginx.conf) from: listen 80; to: listen 8080; Then, you can access it on port 8080: http://localhost:8080/


1

Is that something you would recommend? Sure, if it makes sense for your situation. what are the pros and cons? You could save money by hosting multiple websites on one server. One server also acts as a single point of failure. You'll also lose the ability to scale the websites independently. Can you recommend the best approach to configure AWS to ...


0

This looks like a file permission issue. You should be able to see the ownership and permissions with: ls -l /var/www/site/index.html If you're not familiar with the long output of the ls command, checkout the man page (man ls) for the details. You can also quickly test the file permissions theory by temporarily opening up permissions. This can be done ...


0

Your Browsers are configured to use a proxy. To reach your local addresses, you need to disable the proxy setting.


-1

Best method is to take a average request time for your site page, divide second from that and multiply by number of cores. Let's say your site loads in 0.2s and you have 4 cores. So there is a good chance, that you will be able to serve 20 pages/s. But it's a lie called statistics and everything may go boom, if you users will like hitting a one page, that ...


1

Use something like JMeter to load test it. It is impossible to predict scaling with any accuracy because the bottlenecks you hit will depend on your individual implentation of both website and hardware.


1

You have a strange problem. Sounds like a DNS issue on the web server but the fact that you can resolve the hostname when pinging from the web server does not make sense... Although I cannot explain your problem, I have a suggestion that may help. Try adding the hostname to the "hosts" file on your web server found in C:\Windows\System32\drivers\etc. Edit ...


0

You should try some of the RUM (Real User Monitoring) services such as http://www.gear5.me (requires simple javascript) or http://www.newrelic.com (requres server module). There are few dozens of similar services available on net, but all of them measure load times from the perspective of users.



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