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27

Myth: Allowing ICMP is insecure. This one is a pet peeve of mine, and it's widespread enough to cause significant problems on the Internet. Aside from the handy diagnostics we all know and love, there's Path MTU Discovery and other things that break when ICMP is blocked.


26

Some people have religious believes about allowed and not allowed IP addresses. Yesterday I saw in one of the answers here that 'IP addresses ending in .0 or .255 are invalid' which is plain wrong. Others still think that we have A, B, C - sized subnets only, while CIDR was ruling the world for quite a while. Some claim that disabling ICMP responses will ...


15

All Internet connections are created equal aka download speed is the only thing that matters "I just found out what a T1 is, don't you know that my Comcast cable at home is 6x faster than our connection at work? Why don't we have that here?" It doesn't come up any more, but it got to the point where I'd rather swallow staples than try to explain an ...


14

James Gosling cites Peter Deutsch with credit for the eight fallacies of distributed computing: Essentially everyone, when they first build a distributed application, makes the following eight assumptions. All prove to be false in the long run and all cause big trouble and painful learning experiences. The network is reliable Latency ...


14

Not to over simplify, but Sharepoint comes to mind.


13

I know that this isn't free, but I think the Altassian products could suit your needs. Specifically the Confluence Wiki could help with your documentation and the JIRA module could do issue/bug tracking.


13

MindTouch (previously known as Dekiwiki) is pretty nice. We use it for our Intranet and our users seem to love it.


12

An oldy, but a goody, BPS (bits per second) and BAUD are the same thing - which they aren't. BAUD is the symbol rate. In many system, the symbols each encode 2 or more bits. e.g., +2v = 11 +1v = 10 -1v = 01 -2v = 00


12

Unless there's going to be a lot of content switching tiers, I'd recommend separate wikis, as MW was never built for solid access control. Read http://www.mediawiki.org/wiki/Security_issues_with_authorization_extensions first and decide whether it's worth the effort. There's a lot of warnings and exploits that can circumvent the protection methods. If you ...


12

I've been a partner in a three person contracting / consulting service since June, 2004. We each mainly work our own "accounts", however we need to maintain documentation for each other to allow for "failover" between partners. Most of our Customers have some kind of internal IT staff, many of whom perform some amount of day-to-day maintenance, and we need ...


11

Have a look at WikiMatrix, where you can compare them all by answering a few questions.


10

MediaWiki and thus Wikipedia uses MySQL to store all data shown on the site. You can see their database schema here: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/41/Mediawiki-database-schema.png


9

In practice... 802.11A != 54 Mbit/s, 802.11A ~ 27 Mbit/s 802.11B != 11 Mbit/s, 802.11B ~ 5 Mbit/s 802.11G != 54 Mbit/s, 802.11G ~ 22 Mbit/s


9

One obvious point, or so it seems to me, is if you want something that's very tightly locked down then are you sure you actually want a Wiki. Isn't a large part of the ethos of a wiki that it's as open as possible? Once you've moved far enough away from the original purpose then doesn't it sooner or later become a better idea to try a different tool that has ...


8

We use the open source Screw Turn wiki. It is just about to have a new release (version 3) which will support both WISIWIG editing and markup. It runs in on a windows platform under ASP.net in IIS.


8

I hate when the network is blamed for something with an application running slow. When everything works except your Outlook, stop upgrading the ticket to the networking team saying the network is down. Ignorant help desk workers are the bane of many administrators' existence.


8

It's dynamically generatet with a PHP script. For big sites it's probably better to check for changes and only generate if something changed -- or geneare it only all XY minutes/hours/days. Depends on the infrastructure. The informations needed are all in the database, so it's not such a hard task. And here is the proof: ...


7

The protocols (http, ftp, gopher, etc) which turn into links when surrounded by square brackets ([]) are defined in the $wgUrlProtocols array in your LocalSettings.php file. Here are the default protocols allowed. $wgUrlProtocols = array( 'http://', 'https://', 'ftp://', 'irc://', 'gopher://', 'telnet://', // Well if we're going to ...


7

That doing stuff in "hardware" is always better performing than doing it in "software". (which leads to the obvious question of where one draws the line between these two anyway, or if there's even a good distinction at all?)


6

That "MBps" and "mbps" are interchangeable. Even if I could contextually discern that 'millibits' are not a valid unit of measurement, there's still a factor of 8 difference between the two. And don't even get me started on mebibits.


6

Uhm. It's a database, not a filesystem. You can get the source code here


6

Use separate source code and separate databases. That way you can install extensions or custom themes in one of them without impacting others. If you really know that you will never ever have custom extensions/themes in one but not in the other wikis, then 3. seems to be a better choice than 2, but keep in mind the upload folder (there is a setting in ...


5

Mediawiki upgrades are a doddle anyway, so I run 2 totally separate instances, including a copy of the plugins directory and a copy (not a symlink) of the LocalSettings.php file. I found years ago that trying to save a few minutes on running 2 upgrades would cost me days of getting it set up right, so I just don't bother anymore :) 2 DBs, 2 code instances. ...


5

This website should give you a definitive answer: http://www.wikimatrix.org/wizard.php


5

Mediawiki is by far the most flexible and supported wiki software available today. As it's a trivial and painless thing to install and configure, taking just a few minutes, why not just do it? If you use the Apple supplied wiki and later find it doesn't really suit your needs or desires it will be a much bigger job to switch. With the massive number of ...


5

Do not forget Trac - it is lightweight (but not PHP based), includes a wiki, runs on Linux and provides membership with access control. Wiki System WIKI_VIEW - View existing wiki pages WIKI_CREATE - Create new wiki pages WIKI_MODIFY - Change wiki pages WIKI_DELETE - Delete wiki pages and attachments WIKI_ADMIN - All WIKI_* ...


5

http://www.wikimatrix.org is a great place to start when you are looking for the right wiki. Just reading the list of features available will help you along. You may want to look into foswiki.org. It works fine with Apacheauth (no worrying about the wiki logon being safe), and happily accepts LDAP Auth through Apache. It saves the posts in plain text ...


5

That MAc address duplication is not possible. It is, it's just pretty darned unlikely.


5

The idea that dedicated hardware appliances are always better, more reliable and higher-performance than commodity and/or PC hardware - in practice, with today's costs. It's basically what Cisco wants you to believe; sure, the NPE in the router chassis only has a ~300 MHz ARM processor, but it's got all these ASICs (Application Specific Integrated ...


5

The misconception that using wireless means Internet access is much slower because it shows 54 MB/s whereas using an Ethernet connection shows 100 MB/s. Needless to say it was hard explaining to the user that was only the local network speed and in actual fact the Internet speed for the site was only 8 mbps/ 900 KB/s. Or alternatively, the users that ...



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