Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

Through the Security event logs, you can identify who tried to access a specific registry key if you have enabled auditing. Read more about it here.


2

The Microsoft site sysinternals.com has a utility call regmon (apparently now combined with processmonitor) utility program that will track changes to the registry in real time. A warning, there is a LOT of things that change the registry so be prepared for the output to be very lengthy. However, after the fact, there is nothing that will provide this ...


0

According to Microsoft, the HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies registry tree "contains entries that store Group Policy settings", whereas the HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control registry tree "contains information for controlling system startup and some aspects of device configuration". In practical terms, that means that the Policies tree should generally not be ...


2

I'm not in the position to confirm this, however the "Policies" registry key is designed for Group Policy and will take precedence. The registry key should be protected from user changes and, depending on the implementation at a software level, it may also prevent changes within the application. There are other considerations with regards to the "Policies" ...


2

This is where I'd make the change, in the CurrentControlSet location. You don't need gpedit.msc or anything special, just a registry setting. Set-ItemProperty -Path "registry::HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server" -Name "fSingleSessionPerUser" -Value 0 and to re-enable, set it back to '1'. Set-ItemProperty -Path ...



Top 50 recent answers are included