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9

Your first stop when troubleshooting Group Policy-related problems should be the client computer's Application Event Log, followed-up by the Resultant Set of Policy tool. The Windows Installer will automatically run in a limited user interface (read: silent) mode when invoked from Group Policy-- there's nothing you have to do to the MSI files. (If the MSI ...


7

The cause of this problem is that in EU countries (and certain other TLDs outside the USA), nameserver records are typically cached for more than 1 day. SBS2008 has a cap on the maximum time that it will allow nameserver records to be cached, which defaults to 1 day. This default works fine in the USA but When the .uk and .eu records become stale, they are ...


7

Join it to the domain. You want to be able to manage it easily, don't you? It'll also make the user's life easier when they open outlook and try to access resources on the server. Passwords are cached automatically. I believe the default is 10 logins cached but I may be wrong about that. You can configure more or less caching through group policy.


6

A simple solution might be to use something like disk2vhd. This will create a VHD file, which a drive image format that is compatible with Hyper-V, and can also be directly mounted on Windows 7/2008 R2 and above. VHD files can also be converted so you could boot into a VM compatible with Vmware hypervisors, Virtual box and other popular visualization ...


6

I would advise (temporarily) setting up your new domain on Server 2008 R2, as I've done with my current employer's new forests. Set up your new forest on a (temporary) Server 2008 R2 domain controller. Join your Server 2012 server to the new domain, and promote as a domain controller. Transfer all FSMO roles to the 2012 Domain Controller. "Migrate" SBS ...


6

You could name the user in the "Security" on the GPO with "Apply Group Policy / Deny" permission. It's not really good form to name an individual user in permissions, ever, but you could do that. Edit the GPO, right-click the top-most node in the left pane of the GPO editor, choose "Properties" and go to the "Security" tab. (I won't get preachy in this ...


5

This is where I think a lot of people get this wrong. When you hear or read There can only be one SBS server on the network what you should understand is that they're using the term network in the colloquial sense. What they mean is There can only be one SBS server joined to, and a member of, the same Active Directory domain. You can have, and I've seen ...


5

I had the exact same problem in Srv2008 R2 and this is how I solved it: Right click on the folder your trying to restore from shadow copy and chose 'Previous versions'. Chose a date and click on open. Right click on any file or folder within the previous folder and chose 'properties'. Under 'General' copy what reads in 'location' - .e.g.: ...


5

Personally I would migrate to SBS by joining the computers to the domain as it's going to make long term management a heck of a lot easier. The wizard that's used to join a computer to an SBS based domain includes functionallity to map the local user profile to the domain user profile, so that should simplify the task of getting the two "in sync".


5

It should be possible, but it's difficult without knowing for sure that your hardware is is supported. I'm not going to say that it will work only to have you hit a snag and have it not work, then complain...in some circumstances it might. The smarter thing to do is get a newer server dedicated to virtualization, then migrate your existing server over and ...


4

You can absolutely use a DHCP server to serve a scope it's not a part of, so long as the traffic can flow between the two subnets. The trick is that DHCP requests are generally only served out to the broadcast domain the client is on, to so get around that, you place an IP-helper address on the piece of network gear the client is connecting through so that ...


4

I know cloning/moving DCs is generally unsupported, Really? I Do not. CLONING - yes (as the SSID is identical and a DC is critical on that - they need separate identities). MOVING? Where you get that from? I never heard that and it would make any maintenance on the host simply impossible. Use export - do not JUST copy the VHD. Btw., if you upgraded to ...


4

I'm guessing this script isn't signed. Have you enabled execution of unsigned scripts using the Set-ExecutionPolicy -ExecutionPolicy Unrestricted cmdlet?


4

If your domain administrator account gets locked out, you can still log in with cached credentials by disconnecting the server from the network much like you can log in when a password was changed. You will however be unable to access any network resources since that requires a check from the DC. However, as this is a server ...I strongly recommend against ...


4

One mildly crazy-seeming option would be to boot up a Linux live disk and use dd to make a bit-for-bit copy of the entire drive. Basically: Make Linux live disk (CD or USB key) Boot from it Attach the external USB drive (must be same size or larger than system drive) Figure out which device is the original system drive and which is the USB drive. Run ...


4

Run sp_cycle_errorlog. Schedule that to happen semi-frequently (once a week maybe?).


4

Obviously, be sure that the "problem" computers have the same DNS server specified as the "working" computers. (Ideally they're having that set by DHCP.) It seems unlikely that your Ethernet switch's spanning tree implementation would be blocking access, but to be sure that it's not switch port-related you might try one of the "problem" computers on one of ...


4

This is how to do it: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc770842(WS.10).aspx


4

Starting from the outside in. DNS Active Directory will need Dynamic DNS of some kind. If your existing DNS servers can't do that, then you'll need to use different DNS servers for just the AD domain itself. This is actually a pretty common config. The DNS domain used by Active Directory is something else than where you receive your mail (example: if you're ...


4

There's a few disadvantages. Not many. Probably not enough to outweigh the advantages of having a software RAID. Everyday performance is going to suffer...minimally...probably not noticeably at all Rebuilding the RAID is going to kill performance...probably a lot Software RAIDs typically don't give you hot swap ability, meaning a failed drive requires ...


4

Here's an article related to setting this up in Exchange Server 2007. http://msexchangeteam.com/archive/2006/12/28/432013.aspx


4

That's IPv6-based access to WSUS that you're seeing there. Temporarily disable logging so that you don't fill the drive again: Jump into IIS Manager Locate the WSUS web site (it'll be the one listening on port 8530) Bring up the Logging properties for the root of the site Click "Disable" in the "Actions" pane. That'll stop the logs from building up. I ...


3

DHCP Server can safely be disabled on SBS 2008. See this article from one of the Microsoft SBS Team members for details of how to turn it off and disable the alerts. Do I absolutely have to run DHCP on SBS 2008?


3

There isn't really much point in running SBS without Exchange, but you have spent the money already so you might as well use the license. AFAIK it['s perfectly save to uninstall Exchange, however, I would not waste any time on that. I would simply disable all Exchange related services and get on with whatever else needs doing.


3

While you can probably uninstall Exchange, you would probably need to keep purchasing SBS CALs, which will work out more expensive than plain Windows Server CALs. If possible, exchange SBS for a plain Windows Server product if you don't plan on using Exchange.


3

Many of the Ricoh machines do not support SMB Signing. You may need to disable it on the SBS server if this is the case. See here how to disable SMB signing using group policy. Or you could disable SMB signing via the registry set both below values to 0 HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Lanmanserver\Parameters\Enablesecuritysignature ...


3

You should be able to run backups to the iSCSI volume, so long as you're not trying to backup a volune on the iSCSI to itself (i.e. have a separate backup volume and you'll be fine). To restore, you'll use the Windows "Recovery Environment", just like you would from any other Windows Backup-based restore. I'm not finding docs on attaching to an iSCSI target ...


3

Same as nearly any app, just shift and/or ctrl-click the ones you want, right click and select "Decline"... You are using the newer version of WSUS, that uses a MMC plugin, not the old browser-based interface, right?


3

We've put Hyper-V on SBS. In these days where servers are ridiculously powerful it seems an obvious option and we've found it to work just fine as long as you don't run anything too heavy in the VMs. We use Dells that have two NICs built in. We set up SBS with NIC2 disabled. Once it's all working enable NIC2 then install Hyper-V (and reboot). Now create a ...


3

I would not ignore best practices in terms of different spindles. Here are my reasons. For the OS, having the OS on a different spindle has benefits in terms of backups, restorals and upgrades that have nothing to do with I/O performance. In terms of logs, there are two reasons for putting Exchange stores and logs on different spindles. The first is ...



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