Hot answers tagged

61

You can move the entire C:\Users folder to a different drive pretty easily after windows is installed: Boot to the installation media, and get to the command prompt (press Shift + F10 on the install dialog) Use Robocopy to copy C:\Users to D:\Users: robocopy c:\Users d:\Users /mir /xj /copyall a. /mir tells robocopy to mirror the directories, this will ...


41

Formatting FAT32 volumes on the command line This option should still be in the Format GUI window, but it is not. However, as the other answers suggest, FAT32 is still an option from the command line. Full instructions: Hit the Windows/Start Button -> type cmd.exe in the search box -> press Ctrl+Shift+Enter to get an Administrator Command Line. If ...


24

You can also do a file name that starts with a period, and has no extension. Try naming it ".whatever." (note the trailing period). This works in both Explorer and from the command line.


23

Google is our friend in this: This folder contains installer information for programs that are installed on your system (presumably via the MSI). Deleting this folder or files from it could cause problems with your installed programs or future uninstallation attempts, so MANUALLY DELETING IT IS NOT RECOMMENDED! There seems to be one thing you can do: ...


19

Download fat32format It should works fine.


16

Nothing you do on your local area network is private. Nothing. If someone is sniffing traffic at the router, you can't tell. If someone has attached a hub and is using a promiscuous sniffer, you can't tell. This is the reality of being on a corporate network. That said, there are usually some exceptions. If you are visiting a website that uses SSL or TLS ...


15

The tool to use is probably the windows ports of netcat.


15

You can use the commands listed here to manage Terminal Server connections. query session /server:<servername> is probably the first one you want. These all require remote procedure call, which is part and parcel with CIFS/SMB (the IPC$ share). Check that the RPC service is enabled first. Second, you can't/shouldn't (depending on network configuration)...


13

Just use the firewall Microsoft is shipping. Windows firewall is really ok.


13

There are another two possibilities here: Use the cmd.exe from Windows XP Modify the MUI data for cmd.exe: You’ll need to modify the MUI data file for cmd.exe. This file is called cmd.exe.mui, and is located in C:\Windows\System32\en-US on a standard 32-bit, United States installation. For other languages, the en-US will be different, ...


13

If I'm not mistaken, it's determined by the NIC binding order in the Advanced Settings in the network connections folder. You can verify it by changing the binding order of the various NIC's and running nslookup as a test. To expand on my answer, citing the article that Evan linked, here is an excerpt from said article: The DNS Client service queries ...


13

Use the eventvwr to remotely view the security log for the remote computer, and scroll through the security logs until you find a login event for the other user: eventvwr [remote computer name without brackets]


12

Remote desktop in Vista can be pretty secure. It can use SSL for transport encryption and does network level authentication to verify that the host is the one you where expecting. Getting your traffic is snooped on is unlikely. But that doesn't prevent someone from trying to login. I believe you can setup your system to do account lockout, so if an ...


12

The big thing with Home is that it cannot be a part of a Windows domain - only a work group. That's basically it - so do you need domain support or not? (Some examples are group policies, fine-grained security on a file-system and user level, VPN/remote connection at log-on). Differences according to anime-Paul Differences according to a Technet article ...


11

For individual folders (My Docyuments, My Pictures, etc., the "Special Folders") I do the registry/GPO thing you alluded to. However, if I want to move the entire folder structure I cheat. Move the folder to a new location, and then create a junction pointing the old folder to the new folder. So all your programs will still think the folder is c:\users\...


10

117GB/7H = 4.6MB/s Something is wrong here. Check for disk fragmentation, network misusage, another program grinding the drive or faulty hardware; Windows w/1Gb network can saturate the bandwidth that 7200 SATA drive can provide, i.e. 60-70 MB/s I might also suggest that you create yourself a nice scheduled task to transfer the file(s) overnight.


10

I have a Vista laptop that runs fine, but no I would not recommend anyone pay to upgrade to it with windows 7 getting closer to launching. As for a business decision: If you're lucky, Windows XP is on all of your machines. In our case we have 2-4 thousand XP machines, but some of our software breaks in Windows Vista. We're documenting that and looking ...


10

Personally I have never had a problem with data loss in XP or Vista when simply pulling a USB stick out. The key factor is to make sure data is not being written to the disk when removing it. I do reformat my USB devices to use NTFS tho, (which they typically are formated as FAT32 from the factory). Alternately you will see an icon near your PC clock to ...


10

Just hit cancel when it prompts you; it will bypass disabling/deleting the AD account and join the workgroup.


10

No. If they are a local administrator, they have full privileges over their machine, you can't prevent them from doing anything.


9

The easiest and recommended way is to move the individual special folders inside a user directory, such as Documents, Music, Video's, etc. You can do this with the following steps: Right click --> properties Location tab Fill in the desired location and click 'move' Downside to this is that this still leaves the main 'Users' folder inplace. The hard way ...


9

As a developer, if you code for UAC to be in place then your code will work on everything. I'm in an environment where security is of great concern and we can't buy a product that doesn't play nice with UAC.


9

netstat -ab | find ":80 " Notice the space after 80. The /b requires an elevated command prompt. EDIT: After close inspection, piping netstat -ab into find with that search string does not display the executable that the -b switch retrieves. This is because -b displays the owning process on a new line. =( I fail. But at least the first half of the command ...


9

So the real question here is that you want to move a profile from one OS install to another, retaining appropriate permissions on the user profile. While registry hacks may work, there's a better way. In the Windows AIK, there's a tool called "User State Migration Tool". Its explicit purpose is moving profiles from one OS to another (upgrading them as ...


8

I've spent a long time researching this and finally managed to do it on my own machine. There are two scenarios here: a new install, and a machine that is already installed/used. For a new install, you can (apparently) modify the autounattend.xml file (unresearched link here, no guarantees, I haven't tried) For a machine that is already installed, there ...


8

Yes you can install the video hook driver on Vista, but you have to do it manually. To improve speed, right click on the UltraVNC icon on the taskbar and select properties. Then tick the following boxes: Poll Full Screen Poll Foreground Window Poll Window Under Cursor System HookDll If you are using the video hook driver, check if the Video Hook ...


8

If all else fails, you can disable SNMP monitoring in the printer's TCP port properties. You won't be notified when the printer becomes ACTUALLY offline, but you won't get false positives anymore.


8

As a sysadmin I find it great benefit to have it enabled on users machines, when your called to a problem where it was 'working fine yesterday', and the user has no idea what they have changed since then, using a system restore can often quickly solve a problem, or just eliminate a settings change from being the cause of the problem. To be honest the cost ...


8

This page describes the algorithm used by Windows to perform DNS queries. It's not in depth enough to give you all the answers you're looking for, but some time w/ a sniffer and this article ought to be all you need to determine what's happening in your specific situation.



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