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4

I needed to check whether a DLL with particular name is registered and I used this command in my BAT: reg query HKLM\SOFTWARE\Classes /s /f whatever.dll if errorlevel 1 goto DLL_MISSING If with errorlevel sent control to the label whenver reg query found nothing. You may need to change the part of the registry where you search (in my case HKLM'..., the ...


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Possible - Yes Advisable - No Check your watch, it's 2015 dude! XP's not supported at all, this site's for professional sysadmins, who inherently build and use supportable systems.


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As someone who has more experience in this type of thing than I'd like, I'd advise you to see if you can buy the same or similar hardware as was running this thing previously in order to sidestep the driver issue. At the very least, you want hardware from the same era, because as you're finding out, modern hardware is built to run modern operating systems, ...


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The whole concept of "optional features" which can be installed and uninstalled was introduced with Windows Vista / Windows Server 2008; it was not present in earlier systems. Oh, and it's much easier to get a list of installed features using PowerShell: Get-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online Or using dism: dism.exe /Online /Get-Features The same ...


2

Check this https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee617261.aspx.... There is -Oldpassword param which along with -Newpassword param can achieve this. Remember if you are not a Domain Admin then you need to know the old pwd to do this. Plus when you use the -Oldpassword param ,dont use -reset param.


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A couple of things that you can try with Group Policy are the following: -Set up a fake proxy, and add the internal servers URLS in the "Bypass Proxy Server for Local Addresses" list. This can be easily circunvent if your users manage to install another browser that is not affected by group policies. -You can add a bogus route to 0.0.0.0, and then ...


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[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tcpip\Parameters\Interfaces] That registry address contains a list of GUIDs for all the interfaces. Inside those are the connection settings and other information. Not sure if the old card would be in the current config but you could always look at a backup or other older copy to see if you can get the ...


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I know this is old, but in case it helps others. I had this same issue. I ended up getting the Bitsadmin.exe from the Vista Service Pack 1 (extracted it from one of the cabs in the SP). Running Bitsadmin /util /version /verbose returned an error for the IBackgroundCopyJobHttpOptions interface. I checked the bits files to ensure they were the correct ...


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This error occurs when a user-mode subsystem, such as WinLogon or the Client Server Run-Time Subsystem (CSRSS), has been fatally compromised and system security can no longer be guaranteed. In Short: Someone/Something is killing your LSA. This is less likely to happen, if the executing user has the priviledge of doing so (eg. doing thins right). What can ...


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There is an alternative to using the event log and such, unless you need to go back in time from this point. How about pinging it on a regular basis (scripted) or using some sort of network monitoring software (like nagios)? That's how we tell when servers are up and down.


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The problem is not the IKE Phase 1 configuration, but the Local Policy in the connection settings (not shown in my question). The Local Policy must be the public interface IP in my case, and it wasn't. The log message is misleading, but the USG was actually warning me about that problem, however I decided fixing that warning was a second step and IKE Phase 1 ...


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From a security standpoint it is not advisable to continue running a factory control PC with Windows XP except if you have a contract for continued support with Microsoft. As long as that PC continues to run Windows XP and assuming you don't have contracted support for it from Microsoft, from a security standpoint it is not advisable to connect it to any ...


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Of course it's possible. Connect the computer to the same physical network and give it an appropriate ip address configuration for that network. Then connect to it via RDP and use local credentials to log in (a username and password on this computer). None of this requires it to be joined to the domain.


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Windows XP SP2 and higher can access RemoteApps. According to the Microsoft TechNet page Distribute RemoteApp Programs to Users: To access RemoteApp programs, the client computer must be running at least Remote Desktop Connection (RDC) 6.0. If you have at least Windows XP SP2, the minimum RDC client version is already included in the operating system. ...


1

I'm not sure that this does answer the question / problem, as I've just encountered this same issue, in Windows 10! I had a folder called 'Desktop' located on the 'Desktop'. Never had a problem with this until I ran a system restore tonight and the folder disappeared. I had run the System Restore as I'd be playing around with location of libraries and needed ...


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This is what I was able to use to make it work on a 64-bit Win10 machine, your results may vary, but this worked for me: C:\Windows\SysWOW64\msiexec.exe /x {216AB108-2AE1-4130-B3D5-20B2C4C80F8F} /qn Before getting yelled at for reviving a dead post, I found this on Google while trying to figure out how to batch uninstall QT after the recent revelations ...


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The command is: ping -a localhost



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