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4

You should also update the wordpress configuration. Without that, wordpress still links the static content to subdirectory. Step taken from Moving your Wordpress from a subfolder to the root directory From the main dashboard, go to Administration -> Settings -> General. Next, look for the WordPress address (URI): and change it from (example.com/wordpress ...


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"I've got plenty of memory and CPU for the load" - clearly you don't. Either you make your current workload fit into the available resource or you expand the resource to fit the workload. "Got OpCache running" - tuning PHP is a bit more involved than jus enabling the cache. It's certainly a starting point, but your next step should be to check that you've ...


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Success!! Steps to correct: Used a single site file Added explicit root directive to each location block Order of parsing is important, I've put the location / {} block first added an index directive to location / {} block. Thanks for your help guys! working configuration file: upstream gitlab { server unix:/home/git/gitlab/tmp/sockets/gitlab.socket ...


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You need to update the root directive in the configuration, assuming that your WordPress resides under /var/www/html and not /home/git/gitlab/public.


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You'll need to adjust the number of child processes you start to something lower. Depending on your configuration, that may be located in the httpd-mpm.conf or httpd.conf file.


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turns out the issue got fixed by editing php.ini: cgi.fix_pathinfo=0 replaced by cgi.fix_pathinfo=1 then reloading the php-fpm daemon.


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It looks like your first virtual host points to the domain1 directory. Loading the IP, with those two virtual hosts in that order, would load the domain1 directory. To change that you can just swap the order they are listed in.


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the fine folks at bitnami helped me figure this out: https://community.bitnami.com/t/mysqld-bin-and-php-fpm-eating-up-all-my-cpu-c3-large/27015/4?u=sysadmin Note you have a lot of PHP-FPM processes that they are consuming resources. You have several options: Configure WordPress php-fpm processes to start automatically when needed. You can add this option ...


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If you use chmod g+s instead of g+w, then all future file creations will use the specified group as the default. But that's a manual fix, which isn't really the point of using Capistrano. I had the same problem and with a little help from stackoverflow I managed to hook a task after the deploy is finished to modify permissions of just the current/www dir ...



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