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10

I finally gave up and went to debug this one myself. Based on @SelivanovPavel's answer I turned up debugging on zencommand and waited, and sure enough, the ZenPack was failing. 2012-08-16 18:16:14,092 INFO zen.zencommand: Datasource MySQL/mysql command: ...


5

The cleanest solution, IMHO, is to let the app provide information via SNMP. Then you can monitor it using any software that speaks SNMP, including, but not limited to Zenoss. There are various ways to achieve this. I have done it myself for some custom apps: The apps were running on a Linux server, which already ran the Net-SNMP daemon. So I wrote a ...


4

SNMP's old and crusty. Microsoft has put their SNMP engine in deprecated status, so expect to not even see it included with new versions of Windows. This also sounds like it would be a perfect job for Powershell's new Desired State Configuration, but, DSC is complex. It's a relatively heavy commitment in learning, setting up a pull server, updating ...


4

Check, are there any connection attempts: tshark -i br200 -f "host 2001:db8:81:2c::2" tshark is console version of packet capturing program Wireshark. If zenoss service user is not root - try to connect to mysql from his shell: su zenoss mysql ... What about Zenoss logs(Settings > Daemons)? Try to increase logs verbosity(set logseverity = 30) and see ...


3

Modelling is process in which zenoss runs modeller [Under a device Left hand side Modeller plugins] plugin against the device, to get basic information which wont change frequently for eg: interfaces, file-system partition, Os name, etc. Zenoss will remodel the device every 12 hours. So to monitor a device you need to install net-snmp on device ...


2

Your /tmp drive is full, and your application probably receives uploaded files in /tmp before putting it wherever it really belongs. The other possibility is that you have millions of itty bitty files and you've run out of inodes, you can see how many inodes you have left with df -i. But it's almost certainly the fact that /tmp is full that is the problem. ...


2

Well, this is a rather open-ended question. Basically, you need to Install ZenOSS on a server Make it discover the devices it should monitor (you may need to install/activate SNMP or other services on the devices, so they provide monitoring information) Configure what it should monitor on the device(s) define rules about who should be alerted when there ...


2

The easiest means is to simply send an e-mail to the provider's email-to-text gateway. Which, of course, requires a working internet connection :-).


2

view systemonly included .1.3.6.1.2.1.1 view systemonly included .1.3.6.1.2.1.25.1 rocommunity public default -V systemonly Since you are connecting with the public commit you are limited to only the mibs define by systemonly. You may want to remove the -V systemonly bit.


2

In version 3.X... click Infrastructure at the top navigation, then click IP Services on the submenu. On the left use the search field to find SMTP. In the right side pane under "enable monitoring (zMonitor)" change the value to no. remodel the device immediately and see if it stops monitoring smtp. you may have to restart the collector.


2

After a couple of days of digging, I figured out the problem: InnoDB corruption. Out events database really WAS quite large (we were retaining a year's worth of old events, and had a ton of windows computers reporting tetchy little things, so we had a lot of data), but that wasn't the issue. I started running $ZENHOME\Products\ZenUtils\ZenDeleteEvents.py -n ...


2

"But it returns me the device list only with the IP address" Do you mean in the infrastructure tab or are you referring to the emails from a notifier? If in the notifier, there is a bug in Zenoss 4.2 where the device.id is used instead of device.title in email notifications. To fix, put the following transform into the root "/" event class. d = ...


2

One possible solution turns out to be very simple but searching the internet yields a lot of similar question that are either not answered or ended up taking a different approach or being a different problem to begin with. Zenoss offers the ability to integrate with Nagios plugins, which might not draw your attention if you don't know how this integration ...


2

The maths add up for me. 55 > 2 > 1 > ? = SCOM Also, to be honest, the amount of stuff there is to monitor on a Windows machine, with all the various flavors of Microsoft software sitting on them, for me, would make a tool specialized in monitoring that product a priority. Lastly, I believe SCOM 2007 can monitor several *nix flavours, ESX, and any SNMP ...


2

Try putting it in brackets [2001:470:...] or ipv6:[]. A great many parsers can't differentiate between a text entry and a v6 address.


2

The default Windows device class in ZenOSS has two requirements. First, enable SNMP and make sure that you've set the community strings correctly. Second, install the free SNMP informant module on the server you're trying to monitor, which Zenoss uses to collect more reliable statistics via SNMP. Now, you also mentioned you installed the WMI performance ...


2

Since I see the nagios tag in your question, did you consider integrating Ganglia and Nagios? If so, take a look at this: http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/library/l-ganglia-nagios-1/ http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/library/l-ganglia-nagios-2/ In the Ganglia source code folder, there is a script named check_ganglia.py which can be used as a ...


2

The problem appears to be that from my understanding Zenoss sends the actual message to the scripts STDIN input, but your script expects it as a command line parameter. You have to modify your expect script in a way that it will read the message from STDIN instead of $argv 3. After that, your test script should work like this: echo "Message" | ./sms.sh ...


2

It's working, I looked in the /usr/local/zenoss/Products/ZenUtils/Utils.py file to find that Zenoss sends the message text to stdin so I only needed to read stdin in the expect script to get the message. Here is the new working script: (note that I left out host & port parameters) #!/usr/bin/expect # - VAR set ctrlz \032 set xt \135 set timeout 15 set ...


1

You need to use event transforms in the eventClass where the event is getting transformed and use de-duplication. De-dupid is a combination of device | component | eventKey | eventClass | severity For Example Blade 7 pulled out from chassis 10.2.3.4 eventClass is /Hardware dedupid will be 10.2.3.4 | Blade 7 | Blade_Key | /Hardware | 3 [3 means ...


1

I think event key is the way to work with this, at least we haven't found any better option. Schedules with alerting rules seem to be a bit more problematic but that's another story. Some details can be found at Zenoss Forums : Alerts rules with active periods


1

Apparently, zenoss is unable to do this. :-( Essentially syslog is used for creating event, but these need to be manually closed. You can alter severity (including close) based on content of the message, but mapping the new event to close a different event is non-trivial. There are mappings between zensyylog levels and syslog levels, but none of these map ...


1

You should be able to use the zenoss IP service monitoring. It basically uses SNMP to execute a telnet to the the port specified and send the response back over SNMP.


1

Make a script that will dump the rules to a file (iptables -L or iptables-save) which it will then grep for the appropriate rules. Note that you can restrict the output to just one table. You could also take the hash of the resulting file to detect deviations without messy greps or regular expressions.


1

Note: If you want the pager field to goto someone's SMS "email" like 1235551234@vtext.com you can do the followin. Create folder $ZENHOME/scripts/ Create the script below. Page Command : $ZENHOME/scripts/mail.pl File: mail.pl #!/usr/bin/perl my $title="Alert"; my $to=$ARGV[0]; $from= 'Zenoss'; $subject=$title; open(MAIL, "|/usr/sbin/sendmail -t"); ...


1

You've got an extra zenoss in your first RewriteRule (and you're also doubling up on slashes). It reads: RewriteRule ^/zenoss($|/.*) http://localhost:8080/VirtualHostBase/https/server:443/VirtualHostRoot/zenoss$1 [L,P] It should be: RewriteRule ^/zenoss($|/.*) http://localhost:8080/VirtualHostBase/https/server:443/VirtualHostRoot$1 [L,P]


1

Makew sure you have looked at thew latest release of SCOM 2007 r2. I'd use SCOM, SCVMM and the quest juniper plugin. You can alaso simply do SNMP monitoring of the juniper stuff but it depends on what sort of reporting you need. You could also work on converting that last little linux box over to windows and save yourself the yearly support cost. If you ...


1

Go to "Infrastructure", then under "Devices" and in the "Infrastructure" list click "Details". The monitoring templates will appear and here you can edit the configuration properties, custom schema, etc...


1

I came across this while looking for the same solution. I took lukecyca's advice and asked on #zenoss. The answer is to use zendmd to execute some python, either interactively or write a script to do it. The following script was suggested by "frooderino" on #zenoos: #file.csv is just a txt file with oldname,newname on each line f = ...


1

Indeed there is. There is a zendmd CLI interface which provides a pythonic way to interact with Zenoss. $ /usr/local/zenoss/zenoss/bin/zendmd I'm not 100% sure, but "renaming" devices is probably akin to "moving" them in the devices hierarchy. There are logs of examples here to get you started.



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