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4

I'm using ZFS with non-ECC RAM. Widely enough. I'm not writing this to say it's safe. However, for several years I didn't see zfs corruption yet. Furthermore, when using zfs on ancient hardware, I saw all sort of memory problems, even an inability to boot up. From my experience - you will encounter all sorts of fatal kernel traps faster than the zfs data ...


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The problem is zfs's error correction features (checksum & scrub) can potentially result in a total loss of data on a memory corruption error as opposed to say xfs which will happily write your error to disk in just the affected block(s).


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The VMware compatibility guide includes a comprehensive storage section that lists the supported storage solutions and provides details on what features are available for each listing. You can also filter the search results by the features. After locating a listing you can drill-down into it to see the details. You should be looking for arrays that support ...


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Yes. vStorage APIs for Array Integration http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=1021976 Check the HCL for Storage. OmniOS isn't a listed partner. NetApp is.


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Don't focus on snapshots. It's clouding your judgment :) VMware has templating and cloning functionality built into vCenter. You need a $600 vSphere Essentials license to enable this. You can create a VM to your taste, then clone it to a template. That template can then be used to generate new virtual machines. This allows you to have a "clean state" but ...


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The statement that RAIDZ-1 is "not good enough for real world failures" is because you are likely to have a latent media error on one of your surviving disks when reconstruction time comes. The same logic applies to RAID5. Before we go into specifics, consider your use case. Are you storing photos MP3's and DVD rips? If so, you might not care whether ...


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I think that the root of this question is that there are two fundamentally different methods of doing snapshots. A VMWare snapshot means that is halts writes to its primary disk and instead puts all writes into a separate snapshot disk. Reverting to this snapshot means discarding all the writes since it was taken (which causes very little overhead), ...


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I believe you are misunderstanding the ZIL purpose. You describe it as a write cache which it is not. No activity on the ZIL might just be a normal behavior depending on what is running on your machine. Nothing is ever anything read from the ZIL, this is a write only device outside possibly at mount time after a crash. There are only writes to it if ...


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Yes ZFS snapshoting works well for that, with no performance penalty for adding them as you please. (also easy to replicate for backup, etc) However there isn't any coordination with vmware though so you do need to remove and re-add them to the inventory manually when you revert snapshots. Whether it is a particularly good solution for you depends very much ...


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option - when you want to stay with FreeBSD, check FreeNAS to automate complexity you are afraid of. option - NexentaStor, it is Solaris based storage appliance SW with great management web gui. Up to 18TB setup is for free. Again there you can easily manage complex zfs send|receive vs. a lot of datasets configuration. If you have speedy lines between ...


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Basicly there is no official way to recover other than restore from backup. But there is ZFS feature called rewind, that may be possible to remove transactions from the pool to a point that the pool is functional again. The following text is from ZFS Internals blog part #11 DO NOT TRY IT IN PRODUCTION. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK! zpool import -FX mypool ...


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The current version of FreeNAS (ver 9.3 at the moment) will create a gptid for each drive added to a zpool. Imediately after creation, the "zpool status" will look something like this (depending on your pool configuration)... # zpool status pool: myzfstest state: ONLINE scan: none requested config: NAME ...


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Apart from what is already mentioned, from a performance point of view xfs on MD base raid performs better than zfs on streaming media. I've used the exact same hardware for half a decade with xfs and about the same amount of time with zfs on my media server. On the Intel Atom 330 with xfs I never experience stuter, on zfs on complex scenes the same hardware ...



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