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3

Oh no! You did something kinda bad... Please read: http://nex7.blogspot.com/2013/03/readme1st.html Two issues to note: Under RAIDZ1|2|3, the zpool command reflects the size of the disks comprising the pool, including parity. zfs list will show usable space. That's where the discrepancy comes from. Also, what you ended up doing was... expanding a 4-disk ...


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For something of this scale, use a separate drive or pair of drives for the OS. Perhaps the M.2 SSD slot is the most appropriate. Give ZFS the full disks and don't attempt to spread the OS across those drives. For home-scale, don't listen to all of the suggestions to get a ZIL and L2ARC. The ZIL is only useful for synchronous writes, and the L2ARC is ...


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As far as I know it's not possible to convert an existing zvol to sparse; they must be created sparse to begin with. However, you can create a new sparse zvol, and zfs send from the old one and zfs recv to the new one, and then swap their names.


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Some background information: In ZFS you build your storage pools out of vdevs (virtual devices). A single pool can have as many vdevs as you want, and each vdev itself can consist of one or more disks. Redundancy is managed at the vdev level, so your pool will always be striped (concatenated) over all vdevs it consists of. This means you will lose your pool ...


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You have several choices: Cheap USB 2.0 stick: not recommended because they are slow and the writes will kill most of them pretty quickly, exception: a read-only system like SmartOS (for ZFS) or ESXi (no ZFS, just as an example) which only writes at bootup or once an hour and keeps everything else in RAM or your data pools. More expensive USB 3.0 stick ...



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