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You could try to export your pool, then symlink the device nodes of call constituent devices into e.g. /dev/vdevs, and run zpool import -d /dev/vdevs poolname If the vdev is found this way, then you can make the symlinking occur before the zpool import in the bootprocess (either maybe via udev, or a script) as a workaround.


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In the 1st case, maybe some files of user1 can't be discovered by find(1) because they're hidden by some fs being mounted on top of them? In the 2nd case, maybe something is mounted somewhere under the zfs1 mountpoint and you include that in the space calculation? Incidentally, zfs get -H -o value mountpoint zpool/zfs1 will print just the mountpoint, so ...


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log_info 0x31110d00 decodes to: Value 0x31110D00 Type 0x30000000 SAS Origin 0x01000000 PL Code 0x00110000 PL_LOGINFO_CODE_RESET See Sub-Codes below (PL_LOGINFO_SUB_CODE) Sub Code 0x00000D00 PL_LOGINFO_SUB_CODE_SATA_LINK_DOWN Which boils down to the fact that the SATA device was reset, either on its own, by the SAS HBA or the ...


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Try using this guide: AAron Toponce - ZFS on Linux. Assuming you are trying to create a zfs pool called MyPool, using /dev/sda as a disk, try: # zpool create MyPool sda


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Remove "disk" from your command line. It's the cause of the error you're receiving. zpool create MyPool sda


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Your new filesystem is in /zpgd0/iSCSI. To access it, you can cd /zpgd0/iSCSI. If it is not currently mounted, you can use zfs mount zpgd0/iSCSI. Due to the naming of the filesystem, I'm betting that you probably want to create a ZFS zvol to present as block storage for iSCSI. If that's the case, what you're doing is taking you down the wrong path.


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I use ZFS with hardware RAID and take advantage of the HW RAID controller's flash-backed write cache (instead of a ZIL device) and leverage the ZFS ARC cache for reads. ZFS best practices with hardware RAID Why do you feel ZFS is not performing well? Can you share your zfs get all pool/filesystem output as well as the benchmarks you speak of? It's likely ...


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Yes, you can use sparse files as VDEVs when creating a ZFS pool. Although there was a bug affecting an early Linux ZFS port that prevented it to work, it was fixed four years ago. You shouldn't expect performance or reliability with file based vdevs though. Quoting the zpool manual page: The use of files as a backing store is strongly discouraged. It is ...


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You state that you're interested in using ZFS deduplication. ZFS dedupe requires a good amount of planning, as it has an impact on system RAM resources. If this is a consumer NAS device (e.g. Synology), it's likely not configured with enough RAM to use ZFS deduplication well. As far as the disk situation, you really just want a hardware RAID controller or ...


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If you using Linux and you want to increase the maximum number of loop device: [root@localhost ~]# modprobe loop max_loop=1024 [root@localhost ~]# ls -l /dev/loop* | wc -l 1025


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Yes you can specify sparse file provided with an absolute path to file.I use it for testing purpose only.Refer File Vdevs for more details.


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You also need to enable discard on the ext4 filesystem. Without discard, zfs does not reclaim the space when files are removed. This can end up leading to large space discrepancies between what the ext4 filesystem reports and the zfs volume reports.


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We are a small company with a small VMware ESXi cluster (2 hypervisors with about 15 VM's, both Windows and Linux) and use Veeam Backup & Replication to backup all virtual machines. We currently backup daily to a large local disk and copy that backup file to tape weekly for off-site. Another supported method is to write directly to a remote Veeam server ...


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21GB out of ~6TB available => <1% Freespace. ZFS recommends 20% freespace for RAIDZ, and at least 10% is mostly mandatory for any reasonable performance. You need to free up some space or expand the size of the array. Side nodes: SATA drives need to be scrubbed weekly if you expect to detect array failures before you get into likely data-loss ...


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You're expecting a JBOD, but it appears that this might be set up as a SAN, and you're seeing LUNs. You should check the 6140s themselves.


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Right now you can detach the UNAVAIL disks, ZFS is not using those anymore anyway. You've got two failed disks in a RAIDZ-1 setup. It's very likely you are looking at some data loss and should be ready to restore from backup. As a side note, RAIDZ has proven to be very flaky in my experience with OpenSolaris/Solaris11. I would advise against using it in ...


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I use ZFS on Linux as a volume manager and a means to provide additional protections and functionality to traditional filesystems. This includes bringing block-level snapshots, replication, deduplication, compression and advanced caching to the XFS or ext4 filesystems. See: https://pthree.org/2012/12/21/zfs-administration-part-xiv-zvols/ for another ...


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You can't create a "degraded RAIDZ2", unless you're talking about created the RAIDZ2 pool with all SIX disks, then removing one. But at this point, why not build the pool the way you need in the first place? It's a bad idea because it's just not good engineering. Recall that RAIDZ arrays in ZFS cannot be expanded. Your only expandable option is to use RAID ...


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This is a bad idea... Sometimes it makes sense to use ZFS with hardware RAID, or a combination of ZFS and hardware RAID. This is one of those cases. The main issue you'll encounter doing this the way you're planning is that each single disk will be its own VDISK and have its own MSA RAID metadata. The failure of a disk means that the VDISK is completely ...



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