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2

Copy the data. That is all. There's a bunch of missing output in your examples, but it doesn't matter. The only thing you need to do to move data into a compressed filesystem is to rewrite the data either by copying it, moving it or populating a new filesystem. Avoid the problem in future situations by enabling compression at the pool level so that it's ...


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You just need to create the pool with encryption enabled for its top dataset: zpool create -O encryption=on ...


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ZFS should receive the 'resumable send' feature, which will allow continuing an interrupted replication some time around March of this year. The feature has been completed by Matt Ahrens and some other people, and should be upstreamed soon.


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There is a nice tool to manage the send/recv stuff, and integrate a progress bar it is in the freebsd ports tree under sysutils/zxfer or on github You can also use a tool like sysutils/zfstools or sysutils/zfsnap to automate the creation of the snapshots, that will be synchronized to the remote machine via zxfer There is more documentation on the zfs ...


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I would use incremental ZFS send/receive. It should be more efficient than rsync as ZFS knows what has been changed since the previous snapshot without needing to explore the whole file system. Assuming you want to fully backup a file system namen datapool/fs. You first create a pool to store your backup on the destination server and a recursive snapshot ...


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You can also pipe the send/receive into e.g. bzip2 and rsync it. As this blog post notes, the slave must have "readonly" set.


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ZFS is very resilient. The most basic example of shipping a file system would be: # zfs snapshot tank/test@tuesday # zfs send tank/test@tuesday | ssh user@server.example.com "zfs receive pool/test" Note the snapshot prior to the send (and sending the snapshot). You could wrap that up into a script to delete the local snapshot after you've sent it to the ...


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There is a little bit of a misconception at work here. A lot of the advice you're seeing is based on an assumption which may not be true. Specifically, the unrecoverable bit error rate of your drive. A cheap 'home user' disk has 1 per 10^14 unrecoverable error rate. http://www.seagate.com/gb/en/internal-hard-drives/desktop-hard-drives/desktop-hdd/#specs ...


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This sounds terrible. It's your data, so you can do as you wish... Nobody would endorse the solution, though. This is really a situation where you should just start over. Move your data somewhere temporarily and rebuild.


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Ugly, but this would work. Except when it doesen't;). Be very careful when specifying the partitions and when replacing the disks try it in am VM beforehand, setup the virtual disks like your hardware an dry run it 1 or 2 times. make a scrub before you start and take a look at the S.M.A.R.T info from the disks. You would not try this with an already ...


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As @Mfinni said, check VMware's Hardware Compatability List for a comprehensive list of supported storage devices. The NetApp offers several features that are not available on a generic ZFS-based NAS, particularly with Backups, storage provisioning and the 50% Virtualization guarantee. ...


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Yes. vStorage APIs for Array Integration http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=1021976 Check the HCL for Storage. OmniOS isn't a listed partner. NetApp is.


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The VMware compatibility guide includes a comprehensive storage section that lists the supported storage solutions and provides details on what features are available for each listing. You can also filter the search results by the features. After locating a listing you can drill-down into it to see the details. You should be looking for arrays that support ...


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You have a lot of L2ARC... more than you should. This is not all magical... There are some ZFS best practices that should be part of the design. L2ARC needs to be mapped in real RAM. The best practice that I recall is ~1GB of RAM per 5GB of L2ARC. So you have 172GB of L2ARC... The system would need to be sized to ~34.5GB of RAM for ZFS. Taking a large ...


1

I believe you are misunderstanding the ZIL purpose. You describe it as a write cache which it is not. No activity on the ZIL might just be a normal behavior depending on what is running on your machine. Nothing is ever anything read from the ZIL, this is a write only device outside possibly at mount time after a crash. There are only writes to it if ...


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Apart from what is already mentioned, from a performance point of view xfs on MD base raid performs better than zfs on streaming media. I've used the exact same hardware for half a decade with xfs and about the same amount of time with zfs on my media server. On the Intel Atom 330 with xfs I never experience stuter, on zfs on complex scenes the same hardware ...


2

The statement that RAIDZ-1 is "not good enough for real world failures" is because you are likely to have a latent media error on one of your surviving disks when reconstruction time comes. The same logic applies to RAID5. Before we go into specifics, consider your use case. Are you storing photos, MP3's and DVD rips? If so, you might not care whether ...


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I'm was running same setup in production. IOPS bases its your best possible setup (not taking any Log, ZIL, ARC and L2ARC in account). The bad side of this is that you will face data loss if both disks fail in one 2-way mirror. That sounds like a rare case, but I had to face this 3 weeks ago. It's not that rare if you start thinking about it. It's quite ...


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In raidz2 you will get the IOPS of one disk. If you create two 2-way mirrors your write IOPS will double current ones and your read IOPS will increase four times. Besides that you should check if there is any firmware / update available for both types of disks, SATA/SAS controller, BIOS and NICs.


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Maybe using Root on ZFS could help. I use ZFS on FreeBSD with two pools and nested mountpoints. The first pool (ssd) is the pool where root filesystem is located as are most of the other file systems. The second pool (hdd) is used for file systems with large data mounted to specific locations. I believe because of the root filesystem all the file sytems ...


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I am not sure what kind of data files you need a jail for, and also not sure if you can use warden to create a data jail, warden create data --ipv4=127.0.0.2/32 –startauto then try warden list or jls and jexec


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Yes ZFS snapshoting works well for that, with no performance penalty for adding them as you please. (also easy to replicate for backup, etc) However there isn't any coordination with vmware though so you do need to remove and re-add them to the inventory manually when you revert snapshots. Whether it is a particularly good solution for you depends very much ...


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The current version of FreeNAS (ver 9.3 at the moment) will create a gptid for each drive added to a zpool. Imediately after creation, the "zpool status" will look something like this (depending on your pool configuration)... # zpool status pool: myzfstest state: ONLINE scan: none requested config: NAME ...


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setfacl -b removes an acl entry. You can use also use the -R flag for recursion.



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