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I was able to allow the SCSI disks to pass thru the RAID by going into the config tool (Ctrl+M at boot) and disabling the controller bios. ZFS was not able to run smartd on disks behind the raid controller. This is a 2850 with the 4/DC card controlling the scsi target for a powervault 220s. The disks in the array need to be JBOD and no RAID for ZFS to ...


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AFAIK you cannot make ESXi to wait for a VM to start before mounting the datastores. I may be wrong though. The datastores are mounted way before any VM can boot up. In general iSCSI connects right away if you do a rescan on the iSCSI sw adapter after your storage VM boots up (and rescan it works way better than NFS, where if it gets disconnected/inactive ...


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Define "safe". As in: Does the system boot from USB? Yes Data integrity? No Fault tolerance? No I would not trust a file server to be booted from a single USB pen, unless it's a server just for testing/lab etc. We use USB drives (expensive ones) in our vSphere Cluster, and I've encountered failures many times. You've indicated that you have replaced the ...


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Is it safe to boot Linux from a USB drive? Yes, why not? I do it regularly. But having said that, it's not entirely trivial to do it well. If you just straight install Linux to a USB disk it's usually really slow and doesn't really work that great. However, if you use a tool like unetbootin it'll create a more optimal installation with which you can ...


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You can, but you probably shouldn't. The DL360 G7 doesn't present disks in a JBOD fashion. If you're using the onboard HP Smart Array controller, this won't work the way you expect. Depending on the OS you use, there are swap and other I/O activity considerations. Why go through all of this? If you want ZFS, just use it on the server in a baremetal OS ...


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CBSD (at http://www.bsdstore.ru/en/about.html) has good knowledge of ZFS.


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You didn't post the zpool status for this but you imply in the post that all 16 disks are in a single vdev in RAIDZ2. While this is a good, safe configuration you have to understand that RAIDZ isn't designed primarily for speed. It is designed to be near bulletproof. RAIDZ2 is analogous to RAID6 but the variant has features that make it slower and safer. ...


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There are a couple of explanations. One of them is that the system lost contact to the disk for a while and is now updating the latest changes to that disk. You should not remove a disk while it is resilvering, because RAIDz1 has only a single disk fault tolerance.


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I have managed to resolve the problem by setting ashift=12 (4k alignment) when creating the pool.


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I'd do what ZFS tells you to do in this case. Please run a scrub. I scrub my systems weekly on a schedule. I also use the zfswatcher daemon to monitor the health of Linux ZFS installs. Your ZFS array is probably untuned, so there are some values that can help improve scrubbing performance, but at this point, you should just run it. And for the other ...


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zfs scrub is the "system that will check for zfs errors". It will take as long as it takes to read all data stored in the volume (going in sequential order of txg, so it can be seeking a lot, depending on how full the pool is and how the data was written). Once started, zfs status will show some estimate. Running scrub can be stopped. If you want something ...


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Resilvering (and scrubbing) involves walking the entire B-Tree of the pool, and re-silvering blocks that would have been on the missing disk. Without walking through every single txg in the tree, it cannot know which blocks would have been on the missing disk, hence it scans the entire metadata universe for the pool. It doesn't necessarily read all the ...


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As tegbains pointed out in a comment, zfs send streams do not benefit from any storage-level deduplication in place. They also don't benefit from any other settings; this is why zfs send | zfs receive can be used to migrate data to new settings that otherwise would only take effect once the data is rewritten -- such a enabling or disabling deduplication, or ...


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Use one or the other. I suggest using /etc/exports for consistency and readability, especially if your NFS server is serving data from non-ZFS filesystems.


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I suspect the ATA driver is retrying the read operation a couple of times when it receives an error before passing the error back to the filesystem driver. What this means is by the time the ZFS filesystem driver gets the result of the read the data is all there, and correct, but it likely took a bit longer than normal to happen. There is of course no error ...


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Have you tried using the diskinfo command? http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E23823_01/html/816-5166/diskinfo-1m.html


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You could run zfs mount -a from a startup script? Not that I'd recommend doing ZFS on USB, but hey.


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This seems relevant. The bash script below has functions for attaching and detaching a SR as well as renaming all the UUIDs in an existing (for example SAN cloned) SR. It could be used to rename the UUIDs of an old clone and attach it without conflicting with the latest version of the volume being attached. # returns scsi_id, scsi_lun_id and as a bonus ...


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There is "no way" how to stop Oracle working. Even backups are background non-blocking processes. Use RMAN for backups (which is recommenced). The other way would be to use very old-school approach. create standby controlfile for backup (it will create backup copy of Oracle's control file - having some old SCN in it) execute alter database begin backup. ...



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