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seen Apr 29 at 19:55

Sep
25
comment Laptop connectd to 2 VPNs (1st for Internet over WiFi, 2nd to access shared folders on another network) is failing to route traffic over 2nd VPN
What if I added a route for the VPN2 gateway to the VPN1 gateway?
Sep
25
comment Laptop connectd to 2 VPNs (1st for Internet over WiFi, 2nd to access shared folders on another network) is failing to route traffic over 2nd VPN
Yes. The first VPN just gives the laptop Internet access, since it's secure WiFi at a college campus. The 2nd VPN connects to a server on the Internet at a different campus, allowing me to access file shares on that server. With the proper route in place on all wired clients, traffic directed at Internet-based VPN goes through that tunnel successfully. The problem is this laptop, because there's an extra VPN in there. I'm not sure how they interact, but basically, all traffic needs to go through VPN 1 to reach the outside world, so all traffic to VPN2 needs to go through VPN1.
Sep
25
comment Laptop connectd to 2 VPNs (1st for Internet over WiFi, 2nd to access shared folders on another network) is failing to route traffic over 2nd VPN
Basically, some traffic is selected to go through the 2nd VPN, and the 2nd VPN needs to route all it's traffic through the first VPN. This needs to be done completely on the client.
Sep
25
comment Laptop connectd to 2 VPNs (1st for Internet over WiFi, 2nd to access shared folders on another network) is failing to route traffic over 2nd VPN
To access the Internet, well.. to access anything at all on the WiFi, all traffic MUST go through the first VPN. The 2nd VPN should NOT have all internet traffic go through it, but just the traffic specifically targetted at that VPN. "Use Remote Gateway" is not checked on the 2nd VPN, and shouldn't be, because normal Internet traffic should not go over that VPN. Leaving that option unchecked is what makes it a "split tunnel" as a I said. I added a route to make sure of that. The problem is that I need traffic to the 2nd VPN to go through the first VPN first to reach the internet.
Sep
25
comment Laptop connectd to 2 VPNs (1st for Internet over WiFi, 2nd to access shared folders on another network) is failing to route traffic over 2nd VPN
Laptop connects to VPN1, so laptop has internet access. Browsers and everything function fine. Now I want to access a network share by connecting to a second VPN. Traffic to second VPN fails to route over 2nd VPN. I'm not sure what you mean by diagram... there's nothing to diagram, unless you want a pic of the output of my routing table from "route print".
Sep
25
asked Laptop connectd to 2 VPNs (1st for Internet over WiFi, 2nd to access shared folders on another network) is failing to route traffic over 2nd VPN
Sep
25
answered How to access shared folders over Windows Server 2008 VPN from Windows 7 client?
Sep
25
comment How to access shared folders over Windows Server 2008 VPN from Windows 7 client?
I got it working. Windows 7 sucks at building a routing table from looking at "route print" output. After manually deleting "route delete" the circular/dead end routes Windows 7 created, I added a route that pointed the server's IP address to the VPNs gateway and interface, and it worked. On the server side, I had to allow for File Sharing on the Public network connection, but I restricted it to the local subnet. With the correct route in place on the client, the traffic finally went over the VPN and arrived at the server as a local address, making it through the firewall successfully.
Sep
24
comment How to access shared folders over Windows Server 2008 VPN from Windows 7 client?
Perhaps this is helpful. If I open port 445 on the the "Public" network profile on the server's firewall, then I can connect. The problem, however, is that I can access the shares, with or without the VPN connected, and that's obviously a problem. So.. I thought I could enable all the firewall exceptions for "File and Printer Sharing" for the "private" profile only on the server, thinking it would apply only to the VPN, but then I cannot access the shares. So.. the routing is what's mysterious to me.
Sep
24
comment How to access shared folders over Windows Server 2008 VPN from Windows 7 client?
The DNS servers are the same. The default gateway is always blank, reguardless of whether I have the "Use default gateway on remote network" option checked in the advanced IPv4 settings of the client connection. I leave it unchecked, however, so I can still access the internet from the client.
Sep
24
comment How to access shared folders over Windows Server 2008 VPN from Windows 7 client?
I set up a static IP pool, so my client's IP is 192.168.1.101.
Sep
24
revised How to access shared folders over Windows Server 2008 VPN from Windows 7 client?
added 901 characters in body
Sep
24
asked How to access shared folders over Windows Server 2008 VPN from Windows 7 client?
Sep
24
comment Why does Terminal Services open WMI, RPC, and NB ports in the firewall?
Back door for Microsoft and the FBI, clearly. With port 445 open, all your file shares are accessible from the Internet. Just more "License server" garbage. Even a zero-day vulnerability in June 2012: randomoracle.wordpress.com/2012/06/05/… "Confronted with the risk of getting the enterprise 0wned, the prudent CSO would opt for paying more for software upfront, instead of worrying about one more useless component that creates additional opportunties for attack without any redeeming value– if they had the choice."
Sep
24
comment Why does Terminal Services open WMI, RPC, and NB ports in the firewall?
Not to mention, it sidesteps all that bull in Network and Sharing Center. It's like... you disable every option under "Sharing and Discovery", including File Sharing and Password Protected Sharing... and SURPRISE!!! all your stuff is still shared and accessible because of those Terminal Services firewall exceptions. Mindblowingly unacceptable.
Sep
24
comment Why does Terminal Services open WMI, RPC, and NB ports in the firewall?
I just discovered this today. I'm not happy that port 445 (file sharing) is left wide open to the internet by that terminal services firewall exception. I'm about to disable all exceptions whose name starts with "Terminal Services", because frankly the only port related to it that I expected to be open was the default remote desktop port, which I don't even use the default port (why would they ever recommend using the default port?). It looks to me like some kind of intentional "back door" access. I'm >< that close to ditching Windows Server because of this.
Sep
24
comment Why is file sharing over internet still working, despite all firewall exceptions for filesharing being disabled?
More zero-day issues with Terminal Services Licensing as of June 2012: randomoracle.wordpress.com/2012/06/05/…
Sep
24
revised Why is file sharing over internet still working, despite all firewall exceptions for filesharing being disabled?
added 235 characters in body
Sep
24
comment Why is file sharing over internet still working, despite all firewall exceptions for filesharing being disabled?
"Terminal Services Licensing communicates by using RPC over named pipes. Service has the same firewall requirements as those of the “File and Printer Sharing” feature." - terminalserviceslog.com/blog/index.php/2008/06/29/… SERIOUSLY MICROSOFT!!!
Sep
24
comment Why is file sharing over internet still working, despite all firewall exceptions for filesharing being disabled?
Wonder if it's related to this hotfix: support.microsoft.com/kb/974195