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seen Jun 28 at 19:48

Nov
26
awarded  Yearling
Feb
25
comment Setting up Hyper-V Server 2012 with active/active failover
I just got the opportunity to try out this solution. It did not work. It is not possible to have physical interfaces be a member of a team while at the same time running IP directly over them. Did I misunderstand anything in the answer?
Feb
21
comment Setting up Hyper-V Server 2012 with active/active failover
Oh! Of course, how silly of me, I didn't realise there was posting time information as granular as by second. I was left headscratching myself to figure out what you were responding to. Thank you for your help. I will try this configuration of using iSCSI Multipathing on the same physical interfaces as teaming, since it seems it'll do what I want it to do.
Feb
21
comment Setting up Hyper-V Server 2012 with active/active failover
The rationale would be to keep iSCSI traffic on a single switch. But if you can use iSCSI multipathing on the same physical NICs that are also used for other IP traffic in a team to the Hyper-V Virtual Switch, this would also be an acceptable design.
Feb
21
comment Setting up Hyper-V Server 2012 with active/active failover
I'm aware of the network contention issues. That's exactly what I'm trying to address by (1) keeping the iSCSI traffic on a single switch under normal operating conditions and thus not loading the stacking links and (2) under normal operating conditions passing iSCSI traffic over one NIC and all other traffic on another NIC. This is what I'm trying to figure out if it's even possible to do with Hyper-V. I know it is possible with VMware. (Also, could you please edit your comment to make it clear what you're saying "yes" to?)
Feb
21
comment Setting up Hyper-V Server 2012 with active/active failover
I noticed from reading the document that the reason Microsoft do not support teaming with iSCSI is because teaming is a "non-Microsoft" product. I was under the impression that in Windows Server 2012 teaming was built in to the OS and as such very much a Microsoft product.
Feb
21
comment Setting up Hyper-V Server 2012 with active/active failover
In that case, as an alternative, can the same physical adapters be used both for iSCSI traffic using MCS as well as members of a team carrying VLAN traffic to the Hyper-V virtual switch?
Feb
21
answered vSphere NIC Teaming - Any reason for Active/Standby?
Feb
21
comment Setting up Hyper-V Server 2012 with active/active failover
The storage server will be set up with two 10G network cards. The network card connected to Switch A will be active by default, the network card connected to Switch B will, as long as the link to Switch A is up, not be used.
Feb
21
comment Setting up Hyper-V Server 2012 with active/active failover
How would you specifically set up the teaming to do what was asked in the question? Can you make two virtual NICs, one of which uses NIC A as active and NIC B as standby, and the other one using NIC B as active and NIC A as standby?
Feb
21
comment Setting up Hyper-V Server 2012 with active/active failover
I'm aware that teaming will not increase the usable bandwidth for iSCSI. That's not what I'm trying to do.
Feb
21
awarded  Student
Feb
21
asked Setting up Hyper-V Server 2012 with active/active failover
Nov
26
awarded  Yearling
Jan
31
comment Simple? Network issue, been fighting with all day
Can the untangle router ping the server? Also, what kind of switch are you using, is it a managed switch?
Jan
10
answered Tunneling all traffic FROM a remote site in SSH
Jan
2
comment DHCP and/or DNS server with dynamic 'upstream'
Do you have a reason for actually wanting to swap your DNS servers every time you change ISP? A servicable alternative might be to use a public-access DNS server, such as Google's Public DNS (code.google.com/speed/public-dns). You may then either distribute these two DNS servers directly using DHCP, or run your own DNS server as a caching resolver forwarding to Google's servers.
Dec
12
comment Do I want a VPN or a SOCKS proxy?
Something like that, yes. Although port 8080 is usually used for a HTTP proxy rather than a SOCKS proxy. I suggest port 3128 instead to be a little more "standard".
Dec
12
answered Do I want a VPN or a SOCKS proxy?
Dec
5
comment Easy way to gather file sizes of unc paths?
You're welcome, and welcome to Server Fault! If this answer is to your satisfaction, please mark my response as "accepted" by clicking the green check besides the answer.