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location Ireland
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I currently work for MongoDB, Inc. and have a background in operations, networking and system administration. You can find me in all the usual places, but probably the most useful and relevant are listed below:

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Nov
14
revised Login authentication vanished from MongoDB install
added follow up from comments as part of the answer
Nov
13
comment Login authentication vanished from MongoDB install
The only way I can think of for that to happen (besides someone/something getting access and modifying things) is for your instance to have been restarted without authentication enabled (it is off by default). You should verify what options the mongod is running with and that your admin users and database users are in fact still present.
Nov
13
answered Login authentication vanished from MongoDB install
Nov
5
answered Changing MongoDB Oplog size
Oct
24
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
19
answered Query related to production environment
Sep
19
revised Query related to production environment
Terms were slightly off, mongoose is an ODM, mongos is the router process, also fixed up some sentence structure
Sep
17
comment Very high disk IO on Mongodb Config servers
No, the change is actually in the shared connection code for any mongod/mongos (as a client) making a connection to the config server (it's a special type of connection), so no need to run the mongos with quiet.
Sep
17
revised Very high disk IO on Mongodb Config servers
added a note about the client based aspect of the fix
Sep
17
comment Very high disk IO on Mongodb Config servers
It's worth noting that the mongod's (the primaries) also write to the config servers, though less often, so worth looking at upgrading those to 2.4.5+ also. There are a couple of other things to check too - have a look at the config.changelog collection to get an idea of activity on your cluster - it's a 10MB capped collection that will show you the activity - in particular migrates will cause writes from the primaries.
Sep
17
comment Very high disk IO on Mongodb Config servers
Yes, the relevant change is actually (somewhat counter-intuitively) on the client side (the mongos) which is what decides how the writes are done on the config servers (see: github.com/mongodb/mongo/commit/…), hence you have to make sure all the mongos processes are on 2.4.5+ to resolve the issues.
Sep
16
answered Very high disk IO on Mongodb Config servers
Sep
13
answered Can I use MongoDB with Amazon EC2 small instance?
Sep
4
comment syslog-ng mongodb plugin configuration
MongoDB itself will have some options along those lines in 2.6 but not sure if there is any way to translate what is currently there for syslog. You can see the options in this (complete) feature request already in the 2.5.2 dev release: jira.mongodb.org/browse/SERVER-7965
Sep
3
comment server load too high on mongodb server
Should also look at: info.10gen.com/rs/10gen/images/AWS_NoSQL_MongoDB.pdf
Sep
2
comment How good is this MongoDB/EC2 setup?
Map Reduce will generally be a read on the database, and as to how much of the data will be read in, that will depend on how specific you make the query that feeds it - if you don't use criteria (like last 15 minutes based on a timestamp or similar) then it will run over all the data and likely be horribly slow (even if indexed). If you are selective and have the aforementioned timestamp field indexed, then you are more likely to see decent performance. There are too many variables to say one way or another here - I would recommend testing on a reasonable sample set first to get a baseline
Aug
29
comment How good is this MongoDB/EC2 setup?
Again, it would generally depend on the working set size, not the on-disk storage - I have seen single nodes with terabytes of data, but a working set that is significantly slower. It's all about the amount of the data you are trying to pull off the disk and how quickly you want to do that - storage concerns in terms of volume are purely a matter of making sure you have enough disk to store the data you want. Asking if a database can handle X data is about the same as asking if an OS or a filesytem can handle X data - unless you are hitting a limit it's really not a meaningful question.
Aug
29
answered How good is this MongoDB/EC2 setup?
Aug
9
answered How to install mongodb on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10 (x86_64)
Jul
31
answered How to configure a MongoDB configsvr and arbiter on same instance?