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bio website sethcall.com
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May
8
revised Do ISPs strip or modify QoS/DSCP headers to and from the edge?
added 174 characters in body
May
8
comment Do ISPs strip or modify QoS/DSCP headers to and from the edge?
I expect them to ignore them. I'm just hoping they are preserved in transit... but let me update my question to make that clear.
May
8
asked Do ISPs strip or modify QoS/DSCP headers to and from the edge?
May
5
awarded  Commentator
May
5
comment Determining the version of a packaged process on linux
I would most likely do this if I were on debian, but I'll have to try this bash /proc/$PID/exe scripting answer instead, first.
May
5
comment Determining the version of a packaged process on linux
This is really great. I will give this a go before the checkrestart, since I'm on centos.
May
5
accepted Determining the version of a packaged process on linux
May
3
comment Determining the version of a packaged process on linux
Ooo! Nice. I'm on centos 5.7. A 'yum provides \*checkrestart' brings up nothing, but I will check out the source at a minimum and see if it can be harvested readily. Sounds like it should be.
May
3
comment Determining the version of a packaged process on linux
Sorry I don't have in my hands what specifically failed... but in my way of thinking, at least for the context of this question, it doesn't really matter why it failed to restart--only that it did (and after all, such bad things always can happen, for one reason or another). So, it's important to have a means that you trust to verify what's going on, or least an 'out-of-band' one. It's over 100 servers and roughly 1000 daemons across them of interest. It's enough to where I want to feel very confident that an upgrade took effect.
May
3
comment Determining the version of a packaged process on linux
We use puppet to do just this. While I find it usually does this, we think either it failed to a few times, or the service X stop script of a particular package failed. Also, we've had situations where someone simply screwed up the puppet declarations... but you are right, that to me the 'well at least this gets you 95%' of the way', but I've become a fan of out-of-band mechanisms to verify what other tools are telling me, for stuff as critical as 'which version of the software are you running' sorts of questions.
May
3
comment Determining the version of a packaged process on linux
That's not all. I'm hoping once I settle on a convention (even if I have to figure out something myself), then I can apply that to a secondary but looming problem I have, where some of these services dynamically load other packages without restarting. Meaning package A, which is a daemon, also loads version 1 of package B, and then later version 2, all without the daemon of package A restarting. So, whatever answer I come up with for this question, I'm hopeful it'd also apply to this nastier problem as well, or at least inspire.
May
3
comment Determining the version of a packaged process on linux
For automation of a large number of machines and services. I've already been quite burnt on packages that don't restart when you install them, or try to, and fail to do so, but unfortunately their 'service X stop' script returns success. I'm worried about upgrades to this environment; I'd like to build a bit of automation that queries all installed packaged versions and verifies that everything is up to date--but the also query all the running daemons for those packages, and then secondarily verify that those are up-to-date. I know, it's awfully pedantic.
May
3
comment Determining the version of a packaged process on linux
I'm hoping there is something like a .pid file 'contract', where, if you have a version contained in a file like /var/run/$pid.version, you can feel confident the contents represent the version of the currently running process of the $pid.
May
3
asked Determining the version of a packaged process on linux
Mar
13
comment How does one 'qualify a server'
+1 both ewwhite and Bart, but I had to go with this one because of the good explanatory text. Bart is correct though too; there should be better requirements in this sort of situation.
Mar
13
awarded  Scholar
Mar
13
accepted How does one 'qualify a server'
Mar
13
awarded  Student
Mar
13
awarded  Supporter
Mar
13
comment How does one 'qualify a server'
I would certainly agree you always want requirements up front. Sometimes that's just the way it goes, though.