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visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen Jul 18 at 7:41

Feb
18
comment Windows: View other network shares without sharing anything myself
There are other consultants in my company (and I occasionally do some sysadmin tasks, although that's not my primary job), sorry if that wasn't clear.
Feb
18
comment Windows: View other network shares without sharing anything myself
I do have a strong password on my account, but that measure isn't effective for other people's laptop -- we all know that when you ask them to put a strong password, they end up putting their dog's name :), and I think they shouldn't have to use a strong password to prevent access to a service that shouldn't be offered in the first place. Setting up the firewall is a great idea, though, that way their computers can be configured once and for all. Also, I do know more about linux than windows, but I am aware that there is plenty to know about the latter, so please don't be dismissive :) .
Feb
16
comment Windows: View other network shares without sharing anything myself
@joeqwerty I removed the sarcastic line and picture, to make the question look more objective.
Feb
16
comment Windows: View other network shares without sharing anything myself
@joeqwerty No, it is an actual question (with a bit of a rant in the way it is presented). I really do want to know how I can view shares on the network I'm connected to without risking exposing my data, if that's possible. I currently have disabled file sharing altogether, but it's not a satisfactory solution.
Nov
1
comment Break all hardlinks within a folder
@Tobu Thanks, I modified my code to use mktemp -d in order to create a temp dir, in which I copy the file using cp -i, to avoid accidentally overwriting anything. There's still a possible race condition if we start copying the original file, then something removes it and replaces it with some new file, and we mv the copy over that new file, so this script isn't safe when run in, say, a network share, but should be ok for de-hardlinking files on a local disk where we make sure no process is performing modifications while the script works.
May
8
comment Break all hardlinks within a folder
By 'crude', I mean that, for example, when I ran this command using the cp -i switch, it spat at me a few messages asking if it should override ./fileXXXXXX (the $temp file), even though tmpfile should give unique file names, so there must be some kind of race condition or whatever, and with it the risk to loose some data.
May
7
comment Break all hardlinks within a folder
Indeed, I always use cp -a when copying stuff, to preserve everything, recurse and copy symlinks as symlinks. Don't know why I forgot it this time, but after seeing your answer, I understood I had screwed up all my timestamps, and had to (rather painfully) recover them from a backup.
May
7
comment Break all hardlinks within a folder
I forgot to mention that I didn't have enough disk space to copy everything. Basically, your method is the same as cp -a --no-preserve=links /path/to/folder /path/to/copy && rm -rf /path/to/folder && mv /path/to/copy /path/to/folder, if I'm not mistaken. I guess your method would be more efficient, though, because tar would involve less disk seeks, so less thrashing. One could achieve the same with rsync, with even lower performance than the cp method :).