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seen Jan 25 '13 at 4:30

Oct
5
comment What's the meaning of suffixes that procmail assigns to mail filenames?
Fair enough. In the future, I'll explain to OPs: "This isn't a foo issue, it's a bar issue, and here's the answer and the bar specification." :-)
Oct
5
comment What's the meaning of suffixes that procmail assigns to mail filenames?
I know that (hence the link to the Maildir spec). The OP didn't.
Oct
5
answered What's the meaning of suffixes that procmail assigns to mail filenames?
Sep
19
comment Nagios - Not sure which interval should be changed in order to limit number of times a notification is sent when an error occurs
I don't know why you were downvoted. You answered his direct question and educated him on the Right Way (TM) to solve the problem. Have my upvote to get you back to zero. :-)
Sep
14
comment nagios service check
In your example, check_nrpe!check_load!30 invokes the local check_nrpe command and instructs it to connect to the remote NRPE agent and run the check_load command with a single argument of 30. What this actually accomplishes depends on the value of command[check_load] on the remote machine. At my site, the check_load command calls the check_load plugin with two arguments, in order to specify both the warning threshold and the critical threshold.
Sep
14
comment nagios service check
Sure. check_nrpe!check_zombie_procs!1 5 invokes the local check_nrpe command and instructs it to connect to the remote NRPE agent and run the check_zombie_procs command with arguments 1 and 5. The check_zombie_procs command on the remote machine runs check_procs -w $ARG1$ -c $ARG2$ -s Z, so the 1 and the 5 are used as the warning and critical zombie-process thresholds, respectively.
Sep
12
comment When does it make sense to use DNAT and not SNAT?
The site you linked (philchen.com) gave an example of using DNAT to change the destination port of packets destined for the local machine, with no other NAT/MASQUERADE funny business. I would consider this a rather rare use case, since it's generally easier to simply adjust the port on which the daemon(s) is/are listening. I'm not aware of any uses of DNAT besides (1) port-forwarding on an existing MASQUERADE NAT router, (2) Phil Chen's rare use case and (3) your rare use case which involves an external host. If I haven't managed to answer your question, please do let me know. :-)
Sep
12
awarded  Critic
Sep
11
answered Get list of transferred files from rsync?
Sep
11
answered wget not working with domain on local machine
Sep
11
answered When does it make sense to use DNAT and not SNAT?
Sep
1
comment nagios service check
It depends how you have NRPE configured. Hard-coding the parameters in nrpe.cfg on the clients is more secure, but less flexible. Allowing client NRPE daemons to take remote arguments is more flexible, but less secure. You can tell which method is in use at your site by examining the dont_blame_nrpe option in the client nrpe.cfg files, or just looking to see where the parameters are set.
Aug
31
answered nagios service check
Aug
31
awarded  Teacher
Aug
30
answered rsync - failed to set permission - operation not permitted
Aug
30
answered How do I redirect output to a single line in Bash?
Aug
29
awarded  Supporter
Aug
28
answered Suggestions for free/cheap asset/patch management software (Adobe, Java, etc)