188 reputation
110
bio website emitcode.com
location Snohomish, WA
age 24
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen Sep 7 at 16:04

I write a lot of code.


Oct
12
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
7
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Aug
31
awarded  Tumbleweed
Aug
24
revised How can I allow NAT from inside to outside and vise-versa when each of my clients will have only one static public IP using an ASA5525-X?
added 120 characters in body
Aug
24
asked How can I allow NAT from inside to outside and vise-versa when each of my clients will have only one static public IP using an ASA5525-X?
Jul
30
accepted How do I restore a Windows Server 2008 R2 bare metal backup to a Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V instance?
Jul
29
comment What is causing this seemingly excessive ICMP traffic?
If you intend on hiding the IP address in the image, you may want to also hide it in the packet capture bytes displayed in the ICMP payload you have selected. Simply convert your source IP to hexadeciaml, look for the 4 bytes representing it, then mask the next 4 bytes in the packet, stopping at and masking 0xB2 (178).
Jul
29
comment What is the safest way to convert a Windows Server 2012 Hyper-v system to Linux with KVM?
@MichaelHampton Bizzare? I would say it's just a little different. Most people consider Arch unstable in terms of its releases and maintenance requirements (it's a holy war like arguing different programming languages). But basically I believe Arch to be much easier to install, maintain, and get going. It's exactly what I need, nothing more, and I can harden it very easily. I had to get my two cents in after you said "bizzare"! But yeah, timing the migration will be a thing I need to do. I'm looking for more of a "You shouldn't do that because of X" response, a sanity check if you will.
Jul
29
comment What is the safest way to convert a Windows Server 2012 Hyper-v system to Linux with KVM?
@MichaelHampton The rollback would be just powering off, removing the disks with the partially configured Arch Linux, and shoving the original disks back into the server after removing them from the drive array that was acting as the secondary so that I would be able to copy/convert the VHD files. The source would be on the original drive array, the destination on the live drive array for the new configuration. Hopefully that makes a bit more sense :)
Jul
29
comment What is the safest way to convert a Windows Server 2012 Hyper-v system to Linux with KVM?
@MichaelHampton How would you go about testing it? Would you do a live backup of the image and time the conversion on a different server? Since the host OS doesn't have the conversion utilities needed, I can't do it on itself.
Jul
29
asked What is the safest way to convert a Windows Server 2012 Hyper-v system to Linux with KVM?
Nov
4
asked How do I disable or force certain ciphers to be used with IIS 8 on Windows Server 2012 R2?
Oct
30
awarded  Teacher
Oct
30
answered How do I restore a Windows Server 2008 R2 bare metal backup to a Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V instance?
Oct
28
asked How do I restore a Windows Server 2008 R2 bare metal backup to a Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V instance?
Jul
12
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
4
comment Why do some machines respond with many RST packets instead of RST-ACK to refuse a connection?
@AlexanderJanssen It's just RST and the varying ports were due to not reading the output an additional time. But, still there should be a RST-ACK coming back and not just RST!
Nov
4
accepted Why do some machines respond with many RST packets instead of RST-ACK to refuse a connection?
Nov
4
comment Why do some machines respond with many RST packets instead of RST-ACK to refuse a connection?
I also just realized that I requested a connection from 53 to 80 and then it refused it with RST and then the machine for some reason responded with RST from a different source port and caused all of that confusion. My mistake for not reading it three times :)
Nov
4
comment Why do some machines respond with many RST packets instead of RST-ACK to refuse a connection?
Actually, no HTTP is being done. It's a different protocol, but on port 80. Anyway, the odd part is that those source port numbers are not 80. When you connect to a host from port A to port B, they should respond from port B to port A. So in this case, I request a connection from 53 on 80 and they should respond with packets from 80 on 53, no? Additionally, it's standard for an active refusal to be done with a RST-ACK packet, not just a RST packet.