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seen Jul 6 at 21:45

Feb
14
awarded  Excavator
Feb
14
revised Thoughts on MPM-ITK?
formatting
Feb
14
suggested suggested edit on Thoughts on MPM-ITK?
Nov
15
awarded  Disciplined
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15
awarded  Student
Aug
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awarded  Yearling
Jul
24
awarded  Tumbleweed
Jul
17
revised What chunks are mismatched in a Linux md array?
added 583 characters in body
Jul
17
asked What chunks are mismatched in a Linux md array?
Jun
29
awarded  Commentator
Jun
29
comment what is the meaning of *this* crontab setting?
*/1 is not ignored, it's just that it's the same as *. If it were * */2 * * *, it would execute at every minute of every other hour.
May
20
awarded  Constituent
May
20
awarded  Caucus
Feb
12
suggested suggested edit on How to authenticate users in nested groups in Apache LDAP?
Feb
5
comment SFTP logging: is there a way?
It looks like you need /dev/log in your chroot area. Something like sudo mkdir /chrooted/area/dev, sudo touch /chrooted/area/dev/log, sudo chmod 511 /chrooted/area/dev, sudo chattr +i /chrooted/area/dev, sudo mount --bind /dev/log /chrooted/area/dev/log. Users will still have write access to that /dev/log, but as it's a socket, they can't do much harm if all they have access to is sftp.
Oct
29
answered Can an e-mail's headers tell you if it has an attachment?
Oct
19
answered How can I use HTTPS with *.domain.com AND domain.com?
Oct
14
answered determinging dhcp lease period
Oct
14
comment bash + how to match string that include characters and numbers
Before being a POSIX shell, /bin/sh used to be a Bourne shell (and still is in Solaris which is the only notable exception), but before that it was even something completely different. There's not point trying to be portable as far back as the Thomson shell, and IMO there's no point being portable as far back as the Bourne shell either.
Oct
14
comment bash + how to match string that include characters and numbers
No. it's not what I said. POSIX now defines "sh". What it also says is that the POSIX "sh" might not be in "/bin" and that the behavior when a script starts with "#!" is unspecified. case...in (..) is perfectly fine in a sh script, simply not necessarily in a /bin/sh script. Just don't write /bin/sh scripts, just scripts without a #! line (and avoid Solaris).