Reputation
881
Top tag
Next privilege 1,000 Rep.
See votes, expandable usercard
Badges
4 10
Newest
 Nice Answer
Impact
~43k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 0 helpful flags
  • 34 votes cast
Jan
19
revised Linux / Proxmox KVM machine boots unreliable after migrating to other server
edited title
Jan
19
comment Linux / Proxmox KVM machine boots unreliable after migrating to other server
The migration was done offline as the servers do not share anything, not even a backup space.
Jan
18
asked Linux / Proxmox KVM machine boots unreliable after migrating to other server
Dec
31
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
29
comment How to have Windows Server DNS use hosts file to resolve specific host names
This is a really elegant solution for a problem I just had. Thanks!
Dec
8
awarded  Yearling
Aug
27
accepted How to delete files on NetApp ONTAP 7 by using CLI
Aug
26
answered How to delete files on NetApp ONTAP 7 by using CLI
Aug
26
comment How to delete files on NetApp ONTAP 7 by using CLI
yes, there were snapshots and I solved my problem by deleting the snapshots which has freed enough space to bring the volume und the lun up again and administer the space from the vmware cluster again.
Aug
25
asked How to delete files on NetApp ONTAP 7 by using CLI
Aug
25
awarded  Caucus
May
16
answered Swap being used when RAM is almost half free
Jan
4
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
4
comment Postfix server begins send spam immediately after starting
postsuper -d ALL deletes all mails in your queue. Handle with care, if there might me other, non-spam messages in your queue too.
Jan
4
comment When reading SSD drive specs, what's the difference between MB/s and IOPS?
@HBruijn: I didn't state it, but for me it was clear that in a HP server you should only run drives that are supported by HP for that server. Regarding your number 2) - if a sector of a drive would fail exactly after X write cycles, you'd be right. But it does not. Some sectors fail after X-20%, some at X, some at X+20%. Generally, there is no hard limit for X. Failed sectors are indeed replaced as long as sectors are available. This is done by the SSD controller in the drive. If there are no more sectors available, the drive stops working and is probably dead. Then you have a mirror.
Jan
4
revised When reading SSD drive specs, what's the difference between MB/s and IOPS?
added 556 characters in body
Jan
4
comment When reading SSD drive specs, what's the difference between MB/s and IOPS?
Yes, you're right. If we talk about solaris, illumos and Oracle, I'd recommend ZFS as well. There is no need for a hardware raid controller.
Jan
4
comment When reading SSD drive specs, what's the difference between MB/s and IOPS?
ZFS can be a solution, but is probably not an enterprise solution as you don't get any support. It's not included in the mainline kernel, although it's easy to integrate it. I can only recommend strongly against mdraid (linux software raid). It delivers a fairly high throuput but fails miserably in high IOPS scenarios. Of course you should not go for a $20 Raid Controller if you want to max out SSD drives. The Controllers should be in a position to handle the IOPS and drives like the top ARECA or LSI Controllers (840.000 IOPS, Dual Core CPUs) can.
Jan
4
answered When reading SSD drive specs, what's the difference between MB/s and IOPS?