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Woof.


Aug
2
awarded  Yearling
Nov
14
comment Can I run a cron job more frequently than every minute?
I meant if you don't use a pidfile. If your job runs every X minutes, and takes more than X minutes to finish, you'll end up with jobs stacking up. If your job is also limited by some sort of resource (CPU, network/disk bandwidth, etc), then running more at a time will make it take even longer to finish, and eventually your computer will turn into a thrashing mess.
Oct
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
2
awarded  Yearling
May
31
comment Missing mysql.sock file
You have two problems: 1. You have a skip-bdb option in your config somewhere, which is no longer valid for current MySQL. 2. You have a skip-innodb option in your config as well which is disabling MySQL's only good storage engine.
Mar
31
answered Limit UDP connections per IP iptables
Mar
8
comment Downgrade PHP 5.4 to 5.3 in Debian
@dAm2K The whole point of sid/unstable is that it's where new packages go for testing. While it's usually not broken, there are no guarantees, and upgrading at the wrong moment might give you a broken system if you're unlucky. See debian.org/releases/sid for details.
Mar
8
comment Downgrade PHP 5.4 to 5.3 in Debian
Sid is named after the evil kid in Toy Story. He breaks toys. And servers.
Mar
8
comment Downgrade PHP 5.4 to 5.3 in Debian
I certainly hope this doesn't mean you're using debian unstable (sid) on a server. Because that'd be a really, really, really bad idea.
Jan
4
answered cpu utilization over 100% in linux system
Dec
30
awarded  Good Answer
Dec
28
answered Enabling apt-get on a default Amazon EC2 instance which has yum installed
Nov
11
answered How do I set up two versions of PHP with a single Apache server?
Sep
3
comment Tie a process to specific CPU cores
The kernel is already pretty good at figuring out what CPU cores to use for tasks. Second-guessing it with taskset usually leads to worse results.
Aug
3
awarded  Yearling
Jul
9
comment non-root cp -a preserves ownership?
@nachum: Any NFS server which manages to get permissions THIS badly wrong is probably horrifically insecure in other ways. There's probably ways to read / write / delete files that you shouldn't have access to.
Jul
9
comment non-root cp -a preserves ownership?
What kind of crazy NFS server are you mounting? That's definitely not supposed to be possible.
Jul
8
comment In Linux, how do I umask differently for files and directories?
Not actually quite correct -- execute permissions on a directory allow access to its contents. A directory set 711 will allow users to enter the directory and view files if they know the name, but won't allow ls.
Jul
7
answered Diff for a locally modified package in Ubuntu
Jun
16
comment Unix find mount point permission when filesystem mounted
Please clarify what you're trying to do here.