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  • 0 posts edited
  • 1 helpful flag
  • 19 votes cast
May
23
comment Can I run a cron job more frequently than every minute?
@Mantriur Because the question's author found it helpful and marked it as the accepted answer? :) But seriously, though, you've already identified the problem yourself: many of the other contemporary answers proposed hackish solutions which would be unwise to use in a production system. (Also, keep in mind that several of the other answers only showed up years after the question was asked, so they weren't available to accept yet!)
Apr
23
comment Rotate entire disk set in RAID0 array?
@GregL That only applies to situations where a single RAID array is treated as a "backup" of itself, though. Having a whole separate copy of your data is a perfectly good backup, even if it happens to be stored on a RAID array. (It just needs to be separate from the data that it's a backup of.)
Feb
16
comment How to get Newly Expanded RAID to show correct size in Debian
Er… you DON'T want to use fdisk here. The disk is too large to use MBR; it's actually GPT formatted. Use parted instead.
Dec
3
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Nov
7
comment What are the best methods for catching snowshoe spam?
Out of curiosity: Is a lot of the spam you're dealing with using .link domain names?
Oct
29
answered Why does the “free” command and “dmidecode” show different values for RAM?
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Aug
2
awarded  Yearling
Nov
14
comment Can I run a cron job more frequently than every minute?
I meant if you don't use a pidfile. If your job runs every X minutes, and takes more than X minutes to finish, you'll end up with jobs stacking up. If your job is also limited by some sort of resource (CPU, network/disk bandwidth, etc), then running more at a time will make it take even longer to finish, and eventually your computer will turn into a thrashing mess.
Oct
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
2
awarded  Yearling
May
31
comment Missing mysql.sock file
You have two problems: 1. You have a skip-bdb option in your config somewhere, which is no longer valid for current MySQL. 2. You have a skip-innodb option in your config as well which is disabling MySQL's only good storage engine.
Mar
31
answered Limit UDP connections per IP iptables
Mar
8
comment Downgrade PHP 5.4 to 5.3 in Debian
@dAm2K The whole point of sid/unstable is that it's where new packages go for testing. While it's usually not broken, there are no guarantees, and upgrading at the wrong moment might give you a broken system if you're unlucky. See debian.org/releases/sid for details.
Mar
8
comment Downgrade PHP 5.4 to 5.3 in Debian
Sid is named after the evil kid in Toy Story. He breaks toys. And servers.
Mar
8
comment Downgrade PHP 5.4 to 5.3 in Debian
I certainly hope this doesn't mean you're using debian unstable (sid) on a server. Because that'd be a really, really, really bad idea.
Jan
4
answered cpu utilization over 100% in linux system
Dec
30
awarded  Good Answer
Dec
28
answered Enabling apt-get on a default Amazon EC2 instance which has yum installed
Nov
11
answered How do I set up two versions of PHP with a single Apache server?