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Jun
26
awarded  Beta
Jun
12
awarded  Commentator
Jun
1
comment Leaving my wifi open for the world
Cease & Desist != Indictment/Prosecution/etc. A C&D is only to deter the individual, and in the RIAA's case they've sent thousands of C&D's to WRONG individuals. Receiving a C&D doesn't mean anything, it just means they've tied the IP to his address and are trying to scare him from doing anything further, and in this case he's not the guilty party, and can probably prove it. Stop giving in to the RIAA/MPAA, people. C&D's are FUD.
Jun
1
comment Leaving my wifi open for the world
Has anyone linked to an article or a legal precedent where the individual with open wifi has actually been "sucked into an investigation"? I've heard about it through the grapevine, but I've never heard of it going further than "Hey, this was your IP at the time of the incident."
Jun
1
comment Leaving my wifi open for the world
WPA2 weak keys are only crackable with the right tools a lot of patience. And they're still "dictionary" attacks, because you're comparing encoded passphrases against the WPA2 passphrase. Check out the Rainbow Tables project to see just how much computing it takes to crack WPA2.
Jun
1
awarded  Critic
Jun
1
comment Leaving my wifi open for the world
I agree with palmer above, the usual reply will be "you're going to be responsible for anyone who decides to take over the world from your connection" but as of yet, I haven't seen that used in court. The RIAA/MPAA lawsuits that tried to tie an IP to a person failed miserably, last I checked. There is no reason why you SHOULDN'T be able to run an open wifi, as long as you're aware that someone could log packets if they so chose. Whatever you choose, good on you for asking the question here.
May
2
awarded  Supporter
May
2
awarded  Autobiographer