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 Yearling
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  • 8 votes cast
Dec
15
awarded  Yearling
Sep
15
comment Given an original and backup filesystem, how can I find out if any files are missing?
Tip: If the report is enormous, run: $ checkbackup /path/to/dir1 /path/to/dir2 > ~/Results.txt Then: gedit ~/Results.txt to view it in a nicer editor (you can also use other command based tools, this is just how I could do it)... hope this helps anyone
Sep
15
answered Given an original and backup filesystem, how can I find out if any files are missing?
Sep
15
accepted Given an original and backup filesystem, how can I find out if any files are missing?
Sep
14
asked Folder sizes differ within two copied NTFS file trees (using ntfs-3g)
Sep
14
comment Given an original and backup filesystem, how can I find out if any files are missing?
Also, i know this is a dry-run and your suggested command does not delete anything, but it DOES make me nervous... it's a bit like dry running rm -rf /
Sep
14
comment Given an original and backup filesystem, how can I find out if any files are missing?
This gives an enormous output! Also: Assume no backup solution was used, just plain cp dir1 dir2.
Sep
14
comment Given an original and backup filesystem, how can I find out if any files are missing?
This is great, but I'm only interested in seeing the files that are different? What would the diff flags for that be? I had a look at man diff, and I wanted something --brief, but it only gave me a message saying that the dirs were different
Sep
13
asked Given an original and backup filesystem, how can I find out if any files are missing?
Sep
11
accepted Database based Mail Server
Sep
10
comment Database based Mail Server
I could agree. But they really wanted something very simple and something integrated in the site.
Sep
10
asked Database based Mail Server
Sep
9
accepted SELinux remove or leave the old SSH port label?
Sep
9
comment SELinux remove or leave the old SSH port label?
Ok. Thank you !
Sep
8
comment SELinux remove or leave the old SSH port label?
Out of curiosity, you mentioned (nor is relocating your ssh server to another port necessarily going to make you more secure). Why not? I would have thought that For a hacker to determine ssh is running on your machine, he'll most likely scan port 22 to determine this. An effective method is to run ssh on a non-standard port. would apply?
Sep
8
asked SELinux remove or leave the old SSH port label?
Sep
8
comment ConfigServer CSF and iptables config
Thank you very much sir for that thorough answer !
Sep
8
accepted ConfigServer CSF and iptables config
Sep
8
asked ConfigServer CSF and iptables config
Aug
30
comment Gitolite3 push and selinux access failure
No I resolved it in the meantime. I can't remember which and ahow, I had to fix the SELinux labels, and there was also a SUExec problem requiring the user and group an ID higher than 500.